Posts Tagged ‘science’

Publisher of the Month: Taylor & Francis

24th August 2016

Our highlighted publisher this month is Taylor & Francis Group.

 

Group-logo-blue

Taylor & Francis Group is a founding partner of Research4Life and a founding member of Publishers for Development, a world-leading publisher of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works.

Their content spans all areas of the humanities, social sciences, behavioral sciences, sciences, technology and medicine, and they are the world’s largest commercial publisher of research in the social sciences. Today their journals number some 2,400, with over 3,500,000 articles available via tandfonline.com. They partner with researchers, learned societies, co-publishers, universities, and libraries across the globe to bring knowledge to life.

Taylor & Francis’ research in Health and Medicine, Environment and Agriculture, Development and Innovation, Applied and Social Sciences is available via Research4Life, giving researchers in around 100 countries access to the latest high quality, peer reviewed journal articles at no- or low-cost. Alongside partnering with Research4Life, Taylor & Francis works closely with INASP -also Research4Life partner-, extending the reach of research into other countries and ensuring researchers from Africa to Eastern Europe can access and use research at low cost.

The STAR program

starSTAR (Special Terms for Researchers) is an initiative developed by Taylor & Francis to complement the access given through partner organisations such as Research4Life. Developed to provide individual researchers in emerging regions with 31 days’ free access to leading international and regional journals in over thirty subject areas, it’s “access all areas” coverage spans the arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological and physical sciences. Using a flexible voucher scheme (which researchers can activate when it suits them), STAR extends this free access to researchers based in Latin America, as well as to countries in the global south.

Complementing these initiatives is an active, and much in demand, author workshop program on publishing in research journals. Aimed at early- and mid- career researchers, these events happen around the world, with some 50+ in the last 12 months occurring everywhere from Kazakhstan to Kenya. These have included events run in partnership with AuthorAID, part of INASP, and are key to helping equip researchers wherever they are with the right information and guidance to publish their research successfully.

 

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AGORA: What’s in a name?

20th July 2016

AGORA_subjectsAGORA is about agriculture, but only in the broadest sense


“Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture” might appear to have a strongly agricultural slant, but AGORA’s topical reach extends far beyond that. Did you know, for example, that there are 7,701 resources related to “food safety in the hospitality industry?”  Or, 1,429 journals in AGORA on economics and social science?

In fact AGORA covers the full spectrum of the biological, environmental and social sciences. Its peer-reviewed publications cut through 22 subjects that run from agriculture through to soil science, with anything from nutrition to economics and forestry in between (see photo, above.)

A good way of seeing how many different topics are available on AGORA is to browse by subject.  If you are new to AGORA, do this by clicking on your desired subject from the dropdown menu to see how many journals are available on that theme. Then run a search through Summon to bring up a much larger set of results that includes journal articles, papers and many more content types containing your search terms. 

For example, if “nutrition” is your area of interest, you’ll be presented with over 1 million results through a Summon search. Within “nutrition” AGORA suggests scores of related “subject terms” and you can then use these to further narrow down your search. “Food safety,” for example, yields close to 470,00 results. From “food safety,” you get to “food safety in the hospitality industry”, which returns a further 7,701 results.  

To this end, by ticking or excluding the “subject terms” that interest you,  a topic as seemingly ‘niche’ as “Industrial chemistry and manufactured technologies” (in relation to food safety in hospitality) returns 488 results.

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Publisher of the Month: SAGE

5th April 2016

We are back with our Publisher of the Month section and this time the turn is for SAGE Publishing.

SAGE PublishingPublisher SAGE is an active publishing partner in the Research4Life network, closely aligned and committed to supporting the partnership’s mission to provide access and dissemination of research information to libraries and researchers in the developing world.

Sara Miller McCune founded SAGE in 1965 to support the dissemination of usable knowledge and educate a global community. Just over 50 years later, SAGE has become one of the world leading publishers for the social sciences with a growing portfolio of journals within the sciences, technology and medical disciplines and a rapidly growing selection of library products including archives, data, case studies and video.

Publisher Sage

“Library Value in the Developing World ” by SAGE

Central to SAGE’s mission since its founding has been a focus on a communities firmly believing that access to education creates healthy minds and cultures. This ethos sits at the heart of SAGE’s approach to both publishing and SAGE’s engagement with the community.

Partnership

Through Research4Life and its programmes, users in eligible countries can access nearly 900 journals from SAGE. In addition to access, SAGE also maintains an active relationship with various organisations to support both original research and training opportunities. SAGE has produced a series of white papers looking at the challenges faced by librarians in the developing world and as a result of this research provided training and support workshops to participating institutions.

Commitment

SAGE Publishing is proud to be a long term participant in and supporter of Research4Life.  SAGE was founded with the mission to support the dissemination of knowledge, and a strong belief that knowledge knows no frontiers. Research4Life, and the four programmes that it encompasses, provide integral support, training and access to high quality scholarly content for developing countries. Through Research4Life, researchers and students in developing nations have access to many of the world’s leading sources for science, knowledge and research. As a collaborative project between development agencies, universities and scholarly publishers, it is a great example of how research and development can be advanced by the joint efforts of the academic and publishing communities.  We look forward to continuing to be a part of this outreach by facilitating greater access and engagement with a wide range of scholarly and educational resources, supporting the sustainable development of these countries as academic centres in their own right.

Stephen Barr, President, SAGE International

Further information on SAGE Publishing’s Developing Countries Programme

Alongside SAGE’s partnership with Research4Life, the publisher is also closely aligned with several another developing world initiatives including; International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP), and the eIFL Foundation. Most recently, the SAGE Premier Collection of journals was made available free of charge to Angola, Armenia, Cameroon, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mali, Mongolia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Uzbekistan.

For more information about SAGE’s partnership with any of these schemes please get in touch with Marianne Gill (Marianne.gill@sagepub.co.uk)

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Elsevier provides free online training platform for researchers

30th March 2016

Publishing Campus is a new platform with free online lectures, interactive training courses and expert advice.

Where should you go to get advice on applying for grants, planning your career or improving your publishing skills?

Elsevier launched the Elsevier Publishing Campus in 2015 to provide researchers all over the world with free access to valuable training. Divided into six colleges, the Campus offers online lectures, interactive training materials, videos and expert advice on a wide range of topics. For every online lecture or interactive course completed, researchers are awarded an Elsevier certificate.

The College of Skills Training – the biggest and most widely used of the colleges – covers the whole academic publishing process. This college provides in-depth information and training on how to write, structure and submit a great article and improve your chances of getting published. Key subjects such as ethics, author rights and open access options are included. Advice on successful grant writing can be looked up in the research funding section. The peer-review process, essential to improve the quality of articles, is also explained in detail – training not only includes how authors can work with reviewers’ comments, but courses on how to become good peer reviewers themselves.

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 8.09.31 AMEspecially interesting for the Research4Life partnership might be the Getting noticed resources as to have their article stand out is the goal of every author. Several courses, guides and videos describe how you can increase awareness of your article or book.

Researchers can also visit the College of Research Solutions for a list of tools available to support their research, or the College of Networking for starting points on how to build their networks and take the next step in a successful publishing career, with advice on online and face-to-face networking, and tips on how to get noticed.

All the resources you need to support you through the publishing process are available on the Elsevier Publishing Campus after signing up for free on the website.

Research4Life also offers general training material about the Partnership, Reference Management Tools, Authorship Skills and Program Specific Training on HINARI, AGORA, OARE and ARDI.


About the author

Maike Kunz

Maike Kunz is a Corporate Responsibility intern for the Elsevier Foundation. She has a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Psychology at Mannheim University and is currently finishing her master’s degree in Sociology at Heidelberg University in Germany.

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One Month of Free Access to Around 1,700 Scientific Journals

19th March 2015

If you are a researcher from an emerging region, you can register for the STAR program providing one month of free access to around 1,700 international and regional journals.

T&FThe STAR program provides access to a full range of journal titles by Taylor & Francis, one of our partners committed to increase the dissemination of scientific information to the developing world.

The content provided by STAR  complements the titles that our Research4Life programs – HINARI, AGORA, OARE and ARDI – provide for free or at a low cost to specific subject areas.

starOnce you register to STAR you will receive a voucher (one voucher is granted per recipient per year, and can only be redeemed once) that can be downloaded and activated when needed. Coverage spans Arts and Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Biological and Physical Sciences.

To be eligible for the STAR voucher you must reside in an eligible country. To go directly to the registration page click here.

Taylor & Francis also offers workshops for authors in collaboration with INASP’s AuthorAID. To know more about resources for researchers visit Taylor & Francis online.

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Publisher of the Month – Oxford University Press

11th March 2015

OUPOur Publisher of the Month is OUP (Oxford University Press). OUP is one of our founding partners providing its high-quality resources for free or at a low cost to eligible countries. In addition, OUP participates in a wide range of developing country initiatives, including INASP and eIFL, extending the reach of academic monographs and journals to more than 5,000 institutions in 100 low-income countries.

“Access to prestigious high quality journals and books from OUP has had a significant and positive impact on our efforts over the last 13 years by providing access to critical scientific research, significantly increasing the prospects of health and education in developing countries.”

Richard Gedye, Director of STM’s Outreach Programmes.

OUP offers access to over 285 prestigious and authoritative journals published in collaboration with some of the world’s most influential and scholarly professional societies. The 2015 Oxford Journals Collection includes cited journals in the fields of Medicine, Life Sciences, Humanities, Law, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences.

Online products are also available including:

You can view the complete list of titles here.

Training

The Librarian Resource Center  provides current librarians with training and technical support, including support in Spanish. Libraries in Sub-Saharan Africa receive training materials by ITOCA (The Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa) a capacity building and training organization. INASP network participants are provided with training workshops and materials of particular relevance to librarians.

Institutions will need an Internet connection of least 56kbps, Internet browsers, and a PDF Reader software.

Application

Librarians  or  staff members at institutions in developing countries can access OUP journals through the Research4Life programmes. If you  want to know more about the Developing Countries Initiative, training, and OUP products visit the OUP Librarian Resource Centre page or contact library.marketing@oup.com.

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Grey Literature resources

26th February 2015

What is Grey Literature?

Grey literature is defined as ‘that which is produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in print and electronic formats, but which is not controlled by commercial publishers.’[1]   Examples include technical reports from governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental agencies or research groups, working papers from research groups or preprints, thesis/dissertations and conference papers. Here we list some of the most useful tools to find Grey Literature related to science:

OpenDOARwww.opendoar.org

This resource is a directory of over 2600 academic open access repositories. The directory is run by the Centre for Research communications (CRC), University of Nottingham. Links to various resources are listed on the Country and Organizations access page.  Also available is a Search Repository Contents page.  These search results include links to the full-text documents.

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE)www.base-search.net

BASE is a search engine primarily for academic open access web resources. A resource of over 2600 academic open access repositories, BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library (Germany). Initial search results are organized by relevancy with tools to further refine searches. The search results citations include links to the full-text documents.

Open Greywww.opengrey.eu

Open Grey, a consortium of numerous academic institutions in Europe, is a database of 700,000 grey literature references in Europe plus links to many full-text documents – technical or research reports, doctoral dissertations, conference papers and official publications. Search results are organized by author, organization, discipline, keyword, year and document type with access to the full-text documents.

WorldWideScience.orgworldwidescience.org

This is a global science gateway comprised of national and international scientific databases and portals that, for a keyword search, examines 99 sources. A multilateral partnership, the project was developed and is maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Department of Energy (USA). Search results are organized into papers, multimedia and data sections.   In the Topics section, one of the options is Full Text Articles. Note: search results for this gateway include links to commercially produced material that may be available from the various R4L program portals.

Please open these resources and decide which ones are most useful to your research needs.

 

[1] Grey Literature Report, New York Academy of Medicine, www.greylit.org/about (accessed 02 January 2015)

 


About the author

Lenny Rhine

Lenny Rhine

Since 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders®/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

 

 

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Research4Life – “Unsung Heroes”: Nasra Gathoni video-story

11th February 2015

A new video by Research4Life – in collaboration with Springer, Elsevier, Oxford University Publishing, SAGE and Taylor & Francis – shows the story of Nasra Gathoni, librarian at the Aga Khan Hospital University Library in Kenya.

Nasra story is part of the “Unsung Heroes”: Stories from the library publication. A selection of stories from librarians making a difference in the developing world.

For more information click here.

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Free Digital Tools for Researchers

5th November 2014

Could you imagine doing research without internet? Digital tools have made research practices easier for scientists and librarians. Here we have gathered for you some digital resources to help you conduct research more efficiently and creatively. 

1. Social media

Facebook and Twitter are the most popular social media platforms and can be used to share information and network with colleagues. However, they are not a good fit for the academic sector. When it comes to connecting with the academic community, the following two platforms are specifically aimed to network with researchers around the world.

figshareWith Figshare you can connect with other researchers by uploading any file format to be made visualisable in the browser so that your figures, datasets, media, papers, posters, presentations and filesets can be disseminated. You can connect your account with your ORCID and have a unique identifier in the web. Mendeley is another option to connect with colleagues in your field. You can join different groups and share information. Join the Mendeley/Research4Life group to connect with researchers in developing countries. 

2. Reference management

mendeleyReference management tools help scholars to create and manage their lists of references for research projects. Most tools are designed to organize citations into specific formats for the preparation of manuscripts and bibliographies. 

Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research. You can create an academic profile, upload papers and publicize your research. 

Zotero is a another free and open-source reference management software to manage bibliographic data and related research materials.

If you want to learn about how to install and use reference management tools, check our Training Section with different modules that include free-download tutorials for Mendeley and Zotero.

3. Image editing

SumopaintIf you need to edit images online without installing any software you can use SumoPaint. This photo editor and painting application works directly in your browser. You can open and save images from your hard drive or save it to cloud.

A downloadable option to install is GIMP.  It is a freely distributed program for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring. you can use it as a simple paint program, or for photo retouching, image renderer, format converter, etc.

4. Writing

write latexFor those familiar with LaTeX, writeLaTeX  is a free service that lets you create, edit and share your scientific ideas online using LaTeX. There’s no software to install, so you can start writing and collaborating instantly. A nice feature is that every project you create has a secret link to send it to your co-authors, and they can review, comment and edit.

5. Visualizing data

Communicating results through images and graphics is crucial when working on a research paper, poster or for a conference presentation. Making use of digital tools for data visualization can make your research easier to understand. 

gifflyWith Gliffy you can create flowcharts, diagrams, technical drawings and more. It works directly in your browser with the option to share your files with colleagues or save them in your cloud or local drive. It is simple and very easy to use.

draw.io is another alternative for online diagramming but built for speed  and simplicity. It features integration with a variety of collaborative platforms including Google Docs/Apps.

For specific types of graphs with text, try textexture. This interface allows you to visualize any text as a network. The resulting graph can be used to get a quick visual summary of the text you choose.

6. Organization

We all have quick notes, ideas and specific information to organize. As a researcher you can make your workflow more effective by using applications that help you organize your ideas and to-do’s.

A quick and easy online interface is Keep Google. Sticky notes that you can use to make lists and keep your important links and ideas.

trelloTrello is a web-based project management tool where you can organize projects in a dashboard view, containing one or more project-oriented boards. Useful for organized task management, delegation, communication, and collaboration across teams.

workflowyWorkFlowy is another organizational tool to collaborate on large team projects, take notes, write research papers or keep a journal.

Do you use a different digital tool? Share your suggestions in the comments below.


About the author

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez is the Communications Coordinator for Research4Life. She works with different organisations finding innovative ways to communicate science and development.

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Tips for writing a research paper

16th October 2014

Writing a research paper?

Reporting new results in a scientific journal is a process common to all researchers. However, many scientific papers fail to effectively communicate research work to their audience. Focusing on the authors instead of on the readers, including unnecessary details or using complicated jargon are some of the things you should avoid. Effective scientific papers are interesting and useful to a broad audience including non-experts in the field. The following infographic presents some useful tips that will help you get the most out or your writing process.

For more information on reading and writing research papers check our Authorship Skills modules in our Training Section.

writing a research paper

More:

– Writing in the Sciences: An online course by Coursera that teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, and issues in publication and peer review. http://www.coursera.org/course/sciwrite

– Writing Scientific Research Articles: This book shows scientists how to apply their analysis and synthesis skills to overcoming the challenge of how to write, as well as what to write, to maximise their chances of publishing in international scientific journals. http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118570707.html


About the author

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez is the Communications Coordinator for Research4Life. She works with different organisations finding innovative ways to communicate science and development.

 

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