Posts Tagged ‘research’

Research4Life/INASP Advocacy Competition Winners Announced

29th November 2016

Left: Mary Acanit, Librarian from Uganda. Right: Alice Matimba, Researcher from Zimbabwe.

A librarian from Uganda and a researcher from Zimbabwe winners of the Advocacy Competition

The Research4Life/INASP Advocacy Competition has received inspiring stories from researchers and librarians around the world. More than 150 applicants have shown that it is possible to advocate for improved evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

After an active deliberation process by a panel of selected judges including information experts, and leaders in the field of research information, we have selected two winners for the competition, Mary Acanit from Uganda and Alice Matimba from Zimbabwe. They will be joining us next year in Oxford at the Research4Life General Partners Meeting and the Publishers for Development conference. Both winners will receive a travel grant thanks to the support of our partners Elsevier, INASP and SAGE and a £100 book voucher from Taylor&Francis. We have also awarded a honourable mention to Dinah Baidoo from Ghana, who will receive a year subscription to a reference collection from SAGE.

We congratulate all the participants for their incredible work and efforts to support the research environment in their institutions.

Here we present you the winners:

Mary Acanit (winner)

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As an Assistant Librarian In charge at Kyambogo University Library in Uganda, Mary coordinates all ICT-related activities in the library. She organizes information literacy trainings and workshops and trains library staff on new and emerging technologies so that they are aware of new developments in the library profession.

screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-3-19-26-pmAlice Matimba (winner)

A Senior Lecturer in pharmacology and genomics at the University of Zimbabwe, her research focuses in human genomics, pharmacogenomics, biobanking and ethics. Alice is an advocate for improved health and well-being. She is currently a Principal Investigator at the Zimbabwe Diabetic Foot Project and the Zimbabwe Diabetic Retinopathy Telemedicine Project, which aim to provide screening education and for the prevention of diabetes.

screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-3-21-09-pmDinah Baidoo (honourable mention)

An assistant librarian at Ashesi University College in Berekuso, Ghana; Dinah has represented her library in many meetings, seminars, congresses and conferences locally and internationally. She organizes and train users for effective use of the library eResources. Dinah is also a sub-committee member for INASP/CARLIGH for advocacy/marketing of eResources.

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Publisher of the Month: Taylor & Francis

24th August 2016

Our highlighted publisher this month is Taylor & Francis Group.

 

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Taylor & Francis Group is a founding partner of Research4Life and a founding member of Publishers for Development, a world-leading publisher of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works.

Their content spans all areas of the humanities, social sciences, behavioral sciences, sciences, technology and medicine, and they are the world’s largest commercial publisher of research in the social sciences. Today their journals number some 2,400, with over 3,500,000 articles available via tandfonline.com. They partner with researchers, learned societies, co-publishers, universities, and libraries across the globe to bring knowledge to life.

Taylor & Francis’ research in Health and Medicine, Environment and Agriculture, Development and Innovation, Applied and Social Sciences is available via Research4Life, giving researchers in around 100 countries access to the latest high quality, peer reviewed journal articles at no- or low-cost. Alongside partnering with Research4Life, Taylor & Francis works closely with INASP -also Research4Life partner-, extending the reach of research into other countries and ensuring researchers from Africa to Eastern Europe can access and use research at low cost.

The STAR program

starSTAR (Special Terms for Researchers) is an initiative developed by Taylor & Francis to complement the access given through partner organisations such as Research4Life. Developed to provide individual researchers in emerging regions with 31 days’ free access to leading international and regional journals in over thirty subject areas, it’s “access all areas” coverage spans the arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological and physical sciences. Using a flexible voucher scheme (which researchers can activate when it suits them), STAR extends this free access to researchers based in Latin America, as well as to countries in the global south.

Complementing these initiatives is an active, and much in demand, author workshop program on publishing in research journals. Aimed at early- and mid- career researchers, these events happen around the world, with some 50+ in the last 12 months occurring everywhere from Kazakhstan to Kenya. These have included events run in partnership with AuthorAID, part of INASP, and are key to helping equip researchers wherever they are with the right information and guidance to publish their research successfully.

 

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INASP and Research4Life Launch Research Advocacy Competition

28th June 2016

Global case study competition spotlights how users in the developing world have successfully advocated for a sustainable research culture.

London, United Kingdom June 28, 2016INASP and Research4Life have announced today a competition to recognize the critical role that researchers, librarians, policymakers, doctors and other professionals play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries. The competition calls for case studies demonstrating how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

Over the last two decades, INASP and Research4Life have worked to close the information gap between developed and developing countries by providing free or low cost access to academic, scientific, and professional peer-reviewed content online and providing the necessary training to support researchers, practitioners, librarians and authors in building viable research ecosystems. The competition will run from June 28th to September 15th and highlight best practice in garnering support from leaders to improve the sustainability of this access and usage. Case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international partners from the INASP and Research4Life communities.

Julie Brittain, Executive Director of INASP says: “Since 2002, INASP has been working with libraries, library consortia and publishers to supply relevant and appropriate online literature to academics and researchers in all fields. Top level support from institutional leaders has enabled librarians to provide access to much needed content and to build awareness and use among academics, researchers and students. We are keen for all those involved to share stories of how they have gathered support from decision makers and budget holders, as this is the key to on-going, long term access to research literature.”

“Since 2001, Research4Life has been working to provide access to critical research in the developing world. Our reach has grown to 117 countries and 69,000 journals, books and databases, but we realize more than ever that it can only be truly sustainable if leaders “upstream” of practitioners, researchers, and librarians are equally supportive of this need,” said Richard Gedye, Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and Director of Outreach Programmes at the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, “Our competition aims to celebrate and share those advocacy successes.”

The INASP/Research4Life Advocacy Competition is open to all researchers, practitioners, librarians and policymakers whose institution is a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes  Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI or has access to research through an agreement mediated by INASP. Submissions will be accepted through http://www.research4life.org/research4life-inasp-advocacy-competition. The winner be announced in November and invited to present their work at the annual Publishers for Development conference and Research4Life General Partners Meeting in the UK in July 2017. Three contributing Research4Life partners have pledged prizes: Elsevier will provide the winner with a travel grant to cover their attendance at these meetings, SAGE Publishing has offered a one year subscription to a major reference work and Taylor & Francis will provide an honourable mention award.

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About INASP
INASP (www.inasp.info) is an international development charity working with a global network of partners to improve access, production and use of research information and knowledge, so that countries are equipped to solve their development challenges.

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to nearly 70,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Communications Coordinator
Research4Life
communications@research4life.org
@r4lpartnership

Alex Kealey,
Communications Officer
INASP
akealey@inasp.info
@INASPinfo

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Research4Life-INASP Advocacy Competition

20th June 2016

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Version en Español


Over the last two decades we have worked together with INASP to close the information gap between developed and developing countries by providing free or low cost access to academic, scientific, and professional peer-reviewed content online and providing the necessary training to support researchers, practitioners, librarians and authors in building viable research ecosystems.

In order to highlight the critical role that doctors, researchers, librarians and policymakers play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries, we have joined efforts with INASP to run the 2016 Research4Life/INASP advocacy competition.

The competition calls for case studies demonstrating how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

So we would like to know whether you as a user, librarian, or other stakeholder have successfully advocated “upstream” for support for the research enterprise in your particular institution or country.

  • Have you been successful in efforts to make increased resources available, either in the form of funding for the conducting of research, funding for acquiring access to critical journals, books, or databases, or for improving the quality and quantity of the technological infrastructure and equipment provision in your institution?
  • More challengingly have you ever been able to advocate for a more evidence based local or national government policy based on external research to which you have had access or indeed research which you yourself have carried out?

If you can answer “Yes” to any of these questions, why not enter our new competition. It is designed to highlight and honour examples of successful advocacy in support of improving research capacity within your institution or country or the deployment of research results to achieve evidence based policy development at either local or national level.

Eligibility: The competition is open to all researchers, practitioners, librarians and library staff whose institution is either a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes – Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI – or who have access to online journals or books as a result of deals intermediated via INASP.

Deadline:  September 30th 2016

Judges:  Case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international partners from the INASP and Research4Life communities.

Prizes: Elsevier will provide the winner with a travel grant to the 2017 Publishers for Development conference in the U.K, SAGE Publishing has offered a one year subscription to a major reference work and Taylor & Francis will provide an honourable mention award.

Submissions: Click here to submit your entry.

For more information send an email to communications@research4life.org

This competition is kindly supported by:

supporters-01

 

 

 

 

 


INASP y Research4Life: concurso para la promoción de la investigación

En las últimas dos décadas, INASP y Research4Life han trabajado para cerrar la brecha existente entre países desarrollados y en vías de desarrollo, ofreciendo acceso en línea gratuito o a bajo costo a contenidos académico, científico y profesional revisado por pares. Además, han trabajado facilitando la capacitación necesaria para el apoyo a investigadores, profesionales, bibliotecarios y autores para la construcción de ecosistemas de investigación viables.

Con el fin de resaltar el papel fundamental que juegan los médicos, investigadores, bibliotecarios y tomadores de decisiones en el apoyo a la investigación en sus instituciones y países, hemos unido esfuerzos con INASP para lanzar el concurso “Research4Life/INASP: Promoción de la Investigación”. El concurso convoca estudios de caso que demuestren cómo los usuarios han logrado superar obstáculos para estimular un apoyo crítico al liderazgo de los recursos de información e infraestructura necesarios para mejorar la atención de salud basada en la evidencia, la agricultura y políticas ambientales, así como para la investigación básica en sus países.

Nos gustaría saber si, como usuario, bibliotecario u otro tipo de participación, ha impulsado con éxito estrategias de apoyo a la investigación en su país o en su institución.

  • ¿Ha tenido éxito en sus esfuerzos para incrementar el número de recursos disponibles, ya sea en forma de presupuesto para el desarrollo de la investigación, o de fondos para la adquisición de suscripciones a revistas científicas o bases de datos en línea, o bien para mejorar la calidad de la infraestructura y equipamiento tecnológico disponible en su institución?
  • ¿Alguna vez ha sido capaz de abogar por políticas a nivel local o nacional basadas en evidencia a través de investigaciones a las que ha tenido acceso o por medio de investigaciones que usted mismo ha llevado a cabo?

Si puede responder a cualquiera de estas preguntas, este concurso es para usted.

El concurso ha sido diseñado para resaltar y rendir homenaje a aquellos ejemplos exitosos en el apoyo para mejorar la capacidad de investigación dentro de su institución o país o la difusión de resultados de investigaciones para lograr el desarrollo de políticas basadas en la evidencia, ya sea a nivel local o nacional.

Elegibilidad: El concurso está abierto a todos los investigadores, profesionales, bibliotecarios y personal de biblioteca cuya institución se encuentre inscrita en uno de los programas de Research4Life – Hinari, AGORA, OARE y ARDI – o que cuente con acceso a recursos de información a través de la colaboración con INASP.

Research4Life: Países elegibles

INASP: Países elegibles

Fecha límite: 30 de septiembre de 2016

Jurado: Los estudios de caso serán revisados por un comité internacional de asociados de las comunidades de INASP y Research4Life.

Premios: Elsevier proporcionará al ganador una beca de viaje para asistir a la conferencia “Publishers for Development” a realizarse en el Reino Unido. Adicionalmente, SAGE Publishing ha ofrecido un año de suscripción a una obra de referencia. Igualmente, Taylor &Francis proporcionará una mención honorable.

Inscripciones: Haga clic aquí para enviar su inscripción. Sólo se reciben inscripciones en Inglés

Para mayor información puede enviar un correo electrónico a: communications@research4life.org

Apoyado por:

 

supporters-01

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Publisher of the Month: SAGE

5th April 2016

We are back with our Publisher of the Month section and this time the turn is for SAGE Publishing.

SAGE PublishingPublisher SAGE is an active publishing partner in the Research4Life network, closely aligned and committed to supporting the partnership’s mission to provide access and dissemination of research information to libraries and researchers in the developing world.

Sara Miller McCune founded SAGE in 1965 to support the dissemination of usable knowledge and educate a global community. Just over 50 years later, SAGE has become one of the world leading publishers for the social sciences with a growing portfolio of journals within the sciences, technology and medical disciplines and a rapidly growing selection of library products including archives, data, case studies and video.

Publisher Sage

“Library Value in the Developing World ” by SAGE

Central to SAGE’s mission since its founding has been a focus on a communities firmly believing that access to education creates healthy minds and cultures. This ethos sits at the heart of SAGE’s approach to both publishing and SAGE’s engagement with the community.

Partnership

Through Research4Life and its programmes, users in eligible countries can access nearly 900 journals from SAGE. In addition to access, SAGE also maintains an active relationship with various organisations to support both original research and training opportunities. SAGE has produced a series of white papers looking at the challenges faced by librarians in the developing world and as a result of this research provided training and support workshops to participating institutions.

Commitment

SAGE Publishing is proud to be a long term participant in and supporter of Research4Life.  SAGE was founded with the mission to support the dissemination of knowledge, and a strong belief that knowledge knows no frontiers. Research4Life, and the four programmes that it encompasses, provide integral support, training and access to high quality scholarly content for developing countries. Through Research4Life, researchers and students in developing nations have access to many of the world’s leading sources for science, knowledge and research. As a collaborative project between development agencies, universities and scholarly publishers, it is a great example of how research and development can be advanced by the joint efforts of the academic and publishing communities.  We look forward to continuing to be a part of this outreach by facilitating greater access and engagement with a wide range of scholarly and educational resources, supporting the sustainable development of these countries as academic centres in their own right.

Stephen Barr, President, SAGE International

Further information on SAGE Publishing’s Developing Countries Programme

Alongside SAGE’s partnership with Research4Life, the publisher is also closely aligned with several another developing world initiatives including; International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP), and the eIFL Foundation. Most recently, the SAGE Premier Collection of journals was made available free of charge to Angola, Armenia, Cameroon, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mali, Mongolia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Uzbekistan.

For more information about SAGE’s partnership with any of these schemes please get in touch with Marianne Gill (Marianne.gill@sagepub.co.uk)

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Elsevier provides free online training platform for researchers

30th March 2016

Publishing Campus is a new platform with free online lectures, interactive training courses and expert advice.

Where should you go to get advice on applying for grants, planning your career or improving your publishing skills?

Elsevier launched the Elsevier Publishing Campus in 2015 to provide researchers all over the world with free access to valuable training. Divided into six colleges, the Campus offers online lectures, interactive training materials, videos and expert advice on a wide range of topics. For every online lecture or interactive course completed, researchers are awarded an Elsevier certificate.

The College of Skills Training – the biggest and most widely used of the colleges – covers the whole academic publishing process. This college provides in-depth information and training on how to write, structure and submit a great article and improve your chances of getting published. Key subjects such as ethics, author rights and open access options are included. Advice on successful grant writing can be looked up in the research funding section. The peer-review process, essential to improve the quality of articles, is also explained in detail – training not only includes how authors can work with reviewers’ comments, but courses on how to become good peer reviewers themselves.

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 8.09.31 AMEspecially interesting for the Research4Life partnership might be the Getting noticed resources as to have their article stand out is the goal of every author. Several courses, guides and videos describe how you can increase awareness of your article or book.

Researchers can also visit the College of Research Solutions for a list of tools available to support their research, or the College of Networking for starting points on how to build their networks and take the next step in a successful publishing career, with advice on online and face-to-face networking, and tips on how to get noticed.

All the resources you need to support you through the publishing process are available on the Elsevier Publishing Campus after signing up for free on the website.

Research4Life also offers general training material about the Partnership, Reference Management Tools, Authorship Skills and Program Specific Training on HINARI, AGORA, OARE and ARDI.


About the author

Maike Kunz

Maike Kunz is a Corporate Responsibility intern for the Elsevier Foundation. She has a bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Psychology at Mannheim University and is currently finishing her master’s degree in Sociology at Heidelberg University in Germany.

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African researchers learn how to get their message to a global audience

21st January 2016

TReND organized a course on Science Communication and Writing for young African researchers.

“All forms of science require expertise in scientific communication, with publishing of manuscripts being just one communication aspect.” says Dr Andrew Beale, the Malawi and Mozambique Contact for TReND in Africa. Andrew volunteers for TReND since he and his wife moved from the UK to Mozambique in 2013. He noticed African early career researchers have difficulties in communicating their scientific research. Therefore, as part of TReND’s educational program, he organized a course on Science Communication and Writing at Chancellor College, University of Malawi.

5TReND in Africa” (Teaching and Research in Neuroscience for Development) is a higher education charity dedicated to improving university level science education and research in sub-Saharan Africa. Their mission statement is: STOP the Brain-drain! TReND is run by a small group of young research scientists worldwide and seeks to foster scientific excellence and collaboration in the region through organizing courses for young African scientists, mostly on the topic of neuroscience, but also in other academic fields. Moreover, TReND promotes and coordinates the collection of monetary and equipment donations towards the establishment of permanent research facilities at Africa’s top universities.

1Sixteen young scientists from six African countries including Malawi, Nigeria, Kenya, Senegal, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zimbabwe participated in the Science Communication and Writing course organized by TReND. For most of the foreign participants it was their first time visiting Malawi. Especially the researchers from Nigeria travelled a very long way, more than 6000km(!). All course participants were warmly welcomed by Chancellor College and the college showed them the college itself, the country and bits of Malawian culture.

The early career scientists travelled this long way to learn about scientific communication in the broadest sense of the word. The aim of the course was to enable the scientists to reach out to the broadest audience with their research, not only by strong journal publications but through skills to communicate with the public, the press and policyholders as well.

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Working together on a feature article

With this broad scope intended by the course, fitting all the training material into the available time was a major challenge. Dr Andrew Beale didn’t want to let the young scientists go home without covering the intended content, so he looked for creative solutions. Andrew: “The ‘three minute thesis’ presentations were held and filmed and the videos were given to each of the participants. Unfortunately, due to a lack of time, we couldn’t give detailed feedback anymore. However, this deficiency can be addressed since I have the videos of the talks and gave feedback via e-mail to each participant directly”.

The course consisted of two parts. The first part focused on the scientific manuscript and publication process, while the second part, let by the Training Centre in Communication, considered the broader aspects of scientific communication using interactive training methods. During this week the young scientists participated in lots of activities ranging from writing abstracts for academic papers to discussing Research4Life materials. From designing posters to learning how to use AuthorAID, and from policy panel role play to posting articles with a catching narrative on the course blog.

3One of the Kenyan participants attended a conference the next week, where she was awarded with the 3rd place in poster presentations. This poster was partly made during the course and she stated: “The skills I learnt during the exercises on posters and feature articles equipped me to design this successful poster.” Another, Nigerian, participant stated: “I have two international conferences coming up and I am really looking forward to use what I learned in this course on these conferences.”

The course also helped the young scientists to build international relationships, what even resulted in planning a collaborative article. All participants were at a similar stage in their research careers and had similar interests. The interactive exercises and the space for conversations during breaks forged very strong relationships. On the penultimate evening the participants held a meeting where they planned on surveying colleagues in their home countries on the challenges faced by African researchers in the area of science communication.

The Science Communication and Writing course was held from the 7th to the 12th of September, 2015 and was funded by the Elsevier Foundation with contributions from Sunbird Malawi, and crowdfunding via Indiegogo and Mendeley.

For more information about Research4Life trainings and workshops visit our Training Portal.

 


About the author

Josina Leguit

4Josina Leguit is a Corporate Responsibility intern for the Elsevier Foundation. She has a bachelor’s degree in Communication Science and is currently finishing her master’s degree in International Development Studies at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

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JoMI Joins Research4Life to Bring High-Quality Surgical Teaching Videos to over 100 Countries

2nd July 2015

Boston, Massachusetts July 2nd, 2015 – The Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI, www.jomi.com) announced a partnership with Research4Life that will make the journal’s video articles accessible in over 100 developing countries. Research4Life will provide access to the journal through HINARI, the Access to Research in Health Programme. This partnership will provide 5,700 eligible institutions with an educational resource critical for medical students, residents and attending physicians alike.

The Journal of Medical Insight seeks to mitigate the global discrepancy in patient outcomes between low-volume and high-volume hospitals and surgeons. On a population level, low-volume surgeons’ performance is inferior to that of high-volume surgeons. This trend may be exacerbated in developing countries where The World Health Organization and the Harvard School of Public Health discovered a “scarcity of surgical access in low-income settings.”* Specifically, countries that spend less than $100 per capita on healthcare annually account for 34.8% of the world’s population and only 3.5% of the world’s surgeries.

JoMI’s purpose is to increase surgeons’ intellectual and visual exposure to surgeries. The skills a high-volume surgeon gains from live surgeries are not merely fine-motor. They also gain an overall familiarity with the techniques required, possible complications and how to deal with various pathologies. JoMI provides a means for low-volume surgeons to develop these skills as a part of continuing medical education, in order to help bridge the outcomes gap. Each published article consists of a narrated video, animated visual aids, and a case write-up in order to provide physicians with a comprehensive educational experience.

HINARI’s dedication to improving public health services makes it a natural partner for the Journal of Medical Insight. Launched in 2002 by the World Health Organization, HINARI provides public health workers, researchers and policy-makers in developing countries access to high quality, relevant and timely health information. It is one of four such programs overseen by Research4Life, each of which focuses on research in a different scientific field crucial to the developing world.

“We are very excited to be working with HINARI,” said Nikita Bernstein, CEO of JoMI.  “We founded JoMI to improve clinical outcomes and HINARI presents a unique opportunity to deliver on our mission by facilitating access to the JoMI surgical training videos in the developing world.  We film surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s, and other top hospitals, and are excited to extend our resource to those who would otherwise be unable to access it.”

Dr Mohamed Jalloh, Urologist and Surgeon at Hôpital General de Grand Yoff in Senegal expressed enthusiasm about the partnership.“I have been eagerly hoping for just such a journal to be produced,” he said. “My colleagues in Senegal and elsewhere in the HINARI countries will gain much from this opportunity, and look forward to recommending the filming of further procedures of particular relevance to our settings. This approach would be of particular interest in remote areas lacking medical specialists where access to these movies can sustain the competency based learning/practice.’’

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About JoMI
The Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI) is a surgical video journal dedicated to improving patient outcomes and medical education by publishing high quality surgical teaching videos. Based in Boston, JoMI films at the world’s highest caliber surgical institutions, including Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and the Tufts Floating Hospital for Children. JoMI creates a virtual operating theater, allowing viewers to “scrub-in” and review procedures in a stress-free environment. The journal has released over 30 articles with a focus on orthopaedics and general surgery and is expanding to include all surgical specialities.

 

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (HINARI), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 50,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

Gabriela Mizrahi
JoMI Communications Coordinator
gabriela.mizrahi@jomi.com
Twitter: @JomiJournal
Facebook: Journal of Medical Insight – JoMI

 

*An Estimation of the Global Volume of Surgery: a modeling strategy based on available data. The Lancet.

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Free AGORA online course

30th April 2015

If you are a researcher, librarian or a professional working in Agriculture, the new AGORA online course is for you. Delivered online through the ITOCA Moodle platform, the course takes around 6-8 hours to complete, is self-paced and contains a short set of exercises to complete. You will learn key skills that are necessary for the efficient and effective use of the resources in the Programme. Participants will receive a certificate after finishing the course.

The AGORA programme is a collection of more than 5700 key journals and 4100 books in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences. 2800 institutions in more than 100 countries have registered for free or at a low cost to the programme.

In order to join you must be from an AGORA registered institution.

Registration opens the 4th of May following this online form. You will need your name, email address, institution and AGORA userID.

 

agora_course_flyer_2015_v4-01

 

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Grey Literature resources

26th February 2015

What is Grey Literature?

Grey literature is defined as ‘that which is produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in print and electronic formats, but which is not controlled by commercial publishers.’[1]   Examples include technical reports from governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental agencies or research groups, working papers from research groups or preprints, thesis/dissertations and conference papers. Here we list some of the most useful tools to find Grey Literature related to science:

OpenDOARwww.opendoar.org

This resource is a directory of over 2600 academic open access repositories. The directory is run by the Centre for Research communications (CRC), University of Nottingham. Links to various resources are listed on the Country and Organizations access page.  Also available is a Search Repository Contents page.  These search results include links to the full-text documents.

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE)www.base-search.net

BASE is a search engine primarily for academic open access web resources. A resource of over 2600 academic open access repositories, BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library (Germany). Initial search results are organized by relevancy with tools to further refine searches. The search results citations include links to the full-text documents.

Open Greywww.opengrey.eu

Open Grey, a consortium of numerous academic institutions in Europe, is a database of 700,000 grey literature references in Europe plus links to many full-text documents – technical or research reports, doctoral dissertations, conference papers and official publications. Search results are organized by author, organization, discipline, keyword, year and document type with access to the full-text documents.

WorldWideScience.orgworldwidescience.org

This is a global science gateway comprised of national and international scientific databases and portals that, for a keyword search, examines 99 sources. A multilateral partnership, the project was developed and is maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Department of Energy (USA). Search results are organized into papers, multimedia and data sections.   In the Topics section, one of the options is Full Text Articles. Note: search results for this gateway include links to commercially produced material that may be available from the various R4L program portals.

Please open these resources and decide which ones are most useful to your research needs.

 

[1] Grey Literature Report, New York Academy of Medicine, www.greylit.org/about (accessed 02 January 2015)

 


About the author

Lenny Rhine

Lenny Rhine

Since 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders®/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

 

 

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Research4Life – “Unsung Heroes”: Nasra Gathoni video-story

11th February 2015

A new video by Research4Life – in collaboration with Springer, Elsevier, Oxford University Publishing, SAGE and Taylor & Francis – shows the story of Nasra Gathoni, librarian at the Aga Khan Hospital University Library in Kenya.

Nasra story is part of the “Unsung Heroes”: Stories from the library publication. A selection of stories from librarians making a difference in the developing world.

For more information click here.

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Free Science E-books on the Internet

20th January 2015

Today, Research4Life users can find up to 30,000 science related books available from our platform depending on the publishers’ granting access to countries and institutions.  This material can be expanded with free e-books from several Internet sites. In our recent Research4Life workshops some useful sites were reviewed and discussed . They are useful sources for obtaining background research information, upgrading lecture material and assignments for students.

The following resources include two portals, one gateway, a publisher’s site and one health related portal.  All except one are freely accessible without registration.

Google Books

This search tool contains an extensive list of material from the Google Library Project and Partner Programs.  If in the ‘public domain’, the material can be downloaded.  Otherwise, there is online access through the portal.  Google books has a keyword search key plus several search tools (limit) options.  Search results will include full-text e-books and also chapters/sections of a book on that topic.
Links (citations) can be stored in a personal Google Account.

Booksee

This is a portal that claims to have over 2,400,000 downloadable e-books (PDFs).  It has a keyword search engine plus a broad subject category listing.  Search listings are limited to 100 titles so precise keyword searches should be used.
Each title entry notes the language of the e-book and MB size.  Due to the size of the full-text books, downloading can be time consuming especially if there is limited bandwidth.

FreeBookCentre.net

This portal focuses primarily on academic material.  It has a keyword search tool and also a list of broad subject categories.  One of the principal categories is Medicine which is divided into a lengthy list of sub-categories.  Each entry notes the title, language format and many contain a one sentence summary plus the link to the PDF.

National Academy Press

The Academy grants free and downloadable access to all the PDFs of their e-book publications.  Individuals must register for this feature (free).  The initial screen has a key-word search engine plus links to broad categories including Agriculture, Biology and Life Sciences, Energy and Energy Conservation, Food and Nutrition and Health and Medicine.  Each category has a sub-topic list.

NCBI Bookshelf

From the url or by opening the NCBI drop down menu and clicking on Books, access is granted to all the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s publications.  Access is via keyword search or Browse Titles or New Releases.  In the keyword search tool, other access options (limits) include Subjects, Types and Publishers.  Search results contain the PDFs of books, collections, databases, documentations and reports.

 


About the author

Lenny Rhine

Lenny Rhine

Since 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders®/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

 

 

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The Mendeley Advisor Program

12th December 2014

In previous posts we have talked about Mendeley, one of the many Research4Life partners. Mendeley is a program to manage and share research papers, and a platform to collaborate and discuss with the research community from all over the world. You can join Mendeley for free and be part of over 160,000 users in Research4Life countries.

If you are already using Mendeley in your institution we would like to invite you to become a Mendeley Advisor. Advisors serve as official Mendeley representatives helping to understand the needs of users, labs or departments.

Here are some of the benefits of joining the Mendeley Advisor program:

Personal benefits:

  • Opportunity to make an impact in researchers lives
  • The program and all involvement is voluntary
  • Member of an exclusive program
  • Connect with other passionate Advisors globally
  • Personal interaction with Community & Product team(s)
  • Access to monthly Advisor Newsletter
  • Mendeley merchandise (T-shirts, pens, stickers, etc.)

Product benefits:

  • Free Mendeley Premium account
  • Access to new features before they’re public
  • Participate in beta testing of new features
  • Invitation to Mendeley Advisor Group (members only)
  • Advisor badge on Mendeley profile

Professional benefits:

  • Recognized credential on email signatures and CVs
  • Invitation(s) to attend and host events

For more information and training check our Reference Management section and the Mendeley/Research4Life group. You can also contact the Community team regarding the Advisor Program at mendeley-community@mendeley.com.

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Free Digital Tools for Researchers

5th November 2014

Could you imagine doing research without internet? Digital tools have made research practices easier for scientists and librarians. Here we have gathered for you some digital resources to help you conduct research more efficiently and creatively. 

1. Social media

Facebook and Twitter are the most popular social media platforms and can be used to share information and network with colleagues. However, they are not a good fit for the academic sector. When it comes to connecting with the academic community, the following two platforms are specifically aimed to network with researchers around the world.

figshareWith Figshare you can connect with other researchers by uploading any file format to be made visualisable in the browser so that your figures, datasets, media, papers, posters, presentations and filesets can be disseminated. You can connect your account with your ORCID and have a unique identifier in the web. Mendeley is another option to connect with colleagues in your field. You can join different groups and share information. Join the Mendeley/Research4Life group to connect with researchers in developing countries. 

2. Reference management

mendeleyReference management tools help scholars to create and manage their lists of references for research projects. Most tools are designed to organize citations into specific formats for the preparation of manuscripts and bibliographies. 

Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help you organize your research, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest research. You can create an academic profile, upload papers and publicize your research. 

Zotero is a another free and open-source reference management software to manage bibliographic data and related research materials.

If you want to learn about how to install and use reference management tools, check our Training Section with different modules that include free-download tutorials for Mendeley and Zotero.

3. Image editing

SumopaintIf you need to edit images online without installing any software you can use SumoPaint. This photo editor and painting application works directly in your browser. You can open and save images from your hard drive or save it to cloud.

A downloadable option to install is GIMP.  It is a freely distributed program for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring. you can use it as a simple paint program, or for photo retouching, image renderer, format converter, etc.

4. Writing

write latexFor those familiar with LaTeX, writeLaTeX  is a free service that lets you create, edit and share your scientific ideas online using LaTeX. There’s no software to install, so you can start writing and collaborating instantly. A nice feature is that every project you create has a secret link to send it to your co-authors, and they can review, comment and edit.

5. Visualizing data

Communicating results through images and graphics is crucial when working on a research paper, poster or for a conference presentation. Making use of digital tools for data visualization can make your research easier to understand. 

gifflyWith Gliffy you can create flowcharts, diagrams, technical drawings and more. It works directly in your browser with the option to share your files with colleagues or save them in your cloud or local drive. It is simple and very easy to use.

draw.io is another alternative for online diagramming but built for speed  and simplicity. It features integration with a variety of collaborative platforms including Google Docs/Apps.

For specific types of graphs with text, try textexture. This interface allows you to visualize any text as a network. The resulting graph can be used to get a quick visual summary of the text you choose.

6. Organization

We all have quick notes, ideas and specific information to organize. As a researcher you can make your workflow more effective by using applications that help you organize your ideas and to-do’s.

A quick and easy online interface is Keep Google. Sticky notes that you can use to make lists and keep your important links and ideas.

trelloTrello is a web-based project management tool where you can organize projects in a dashboard view, containing one or more project-oriented boards. Useful for organized task management, delegation, communication, and collaboration across teams.

workflowyWorkFlowy is another organizational tool to collaborate on large team projects, take notes, write research papers or keep a journal.

Do you use a different digital tool? Share your suggestions in the comments below.


About the author

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez is the Communications Coordinator for Research4Life. She works with different organisations finding innovative ways to communicate science and development.

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Tips for writing a research paper

16th October 2014

Writing a research paper?

Reporting new results in a scientific journal is a process common to all researchers. However, many scientific papers fail to effectively communicate research work to their audience. Focusing on the authors instead of on the readers, including unnecessary details or using complicated jargon are some of the things you should avoid. Effective scientific papers are interesting and useful to a broad audience including non-experts in the field. The following infographic presents some useful tips that will help you get the most out or your writing process.

For more information on reading and writing research papers check our Authorship Skills modules in our Training Section.

writing a research paper

More:

– Writing in the Sciences: An online course by Coursera that teaches scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Topics include: principles of good writing, tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, the format of a scientific manuscript, and issues in publication and peer review. http://www.coursera.org/course/sciwrite

– Writing Scientific Research Articles: This book shows scientists how to apply their analysis and synthesis skills to overcoming the challenge of how to write, as well as what to write, to maximise their chances of publishing in international scientific journals. http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118570707.html


About the author

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez

Natalia Rodriguez is the Communications Coordinator for Research4Life. She works with different organisations finding innovative ways to communicate science and development.

 

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