Posts Tagged ‘access’

Winners of Research4Life prize drawing announced

20th September 2016
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Dr. Christopher Dye and Kimberly Parker from WHO

King Hussein Cancer Center is the lucky winner of the First Prize 

Research4Life provides access to tens of thousands of online books and journals daily, but it is a rare occasion when it can offer a physical printed publication to one of the institutions. All institutions who paid for 2016 access to Research4Life were automatically entered this year in a Research4Life random drawing  to win a major reference printed publication from one of the publisher partners. The slips with institution names on them were drawn in a random selection by Dr Christopher Dye, the Director of SPI (Strategy, Policy and Information) of the World Health Organization.

The reference publications offered as prizes by the Research4Life partnership were:

*ICD-10 International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision, Vol.1-3, 2010 edition (provided by the World Health Organization)
*Principles and Practice of Clinical Research, 4th edition (provided by Elsevier)

Delivering the first Prize for Ms Alice Haddadin, Director Library King Hussein Cancer Center

With great pleasure, we announce the first prize, first runner up and honourable mention winners of our 2016 payment promotion!

  • King Hussein Cancer Center (Jordan) – First Prize
  • St. George’s University (Grenada) – First runner up
  • Universiteti Aldent (Albania) – Honourable mention
  • University of Academy of Science of Moldova. Central Scientific Library “A. Lupan” (Republic of Moldova) – Honourable mention
  • Center of Early Intervention “Voinicel” (Republic of Moldova)  – Honourable mention
  • University of Tirana (Albania) – Honourable mention
  • Ministry of Health. National Aids Programme (Suriname) – Honourable mention
  • Trinity School of Medicine (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines) – Honourable mention
  • Ilia State University(ISU) (Georgia) – Honourable mention
  • Universidad Católica Boliviana San Pablo, Regional Santa Cruz (Bolivia) – Honourable mention

We look forward to holding similar drawings in the future for the benefit of all the Research4Life institutions.  Congratulations to all the winning participants!

Professor Ivan Puiu from Voinicel Center

Professor Ivan Puiu from Voinicel Center

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Publisher of the Month: Taylor & Francis

24th August 2016

Our highlighted publisher this month is Taylor & Francis Group.

 

Group-logo-blue

Taylor & Francis Group is a founding partner of Research4Life and a founding member of Publishers for Development, a world-leading publisher of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works.

Their content spans all areas of the humanities, social sciences, behavioral sciences, sciences, technology and medicine, and they are the world’s largest commercial publisher of research in the social sciences. Today their journals number some 2,400, with over 3,500,000 articles available via tandfonline.com. They partner with researchers, learned societies, co-publishers, universities, and libraries across the globe to bring knowledge to life.

Taylor & Francis’ research in Health and Medicine, Environment and Agriculture, Development and Innovation, Applied and Social Sciences is available via Research4Life, giving researchers in around 100 countries access to the latest high quality, peer reviewed journal articles at no- or low-cost. Alongside partnering with Research4Life, Taylor & Francis works closely with INASP -also Research4Life partner-, extending the reach of research into other countries and ensuring researchers from Africa to Eastern Europe can access and use research at low cost.

The STAR program

starSTAR (Special Terms for Researchers) is an initiative developed by Taylor & Francis to complement the access given through partner organisations such as Research4Life. Developed to provide individual researchers in emerging regions with 31 days’ free access to leading international and regional journals in over thirty subject areas, it’s “access all areas” coverage spans the arts and humanities, social and behavioral sciences, and biological and physical sciences. Using a flexible voucher scheme (which researchers can activate when it suits them), STAR extends this free access to researchers based in Latin America, as well as to countries in the global south.

Complementing these initiatives is an active, and much in demand, author workshop program on publishing in research journals. Aimed at early- and mid- career researchers, these events happen around the world, with some 50+ in the last 12 months occurring everywhere from Kazakhstan to Kenya. These have included events run in partnership with AuthorAID, part of INASP, and are key to helping equip researchers wherever they are with the right information and guidance to publish their research successfully.

 

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INASP and Research4Life Launch Research Advocacy Competition

28th June 2016

Global case study competition spotlights how users in the developing world have successfully advocated for a sustainable research culture.

London, United Kingdom June 28, 2016INASP and Research4Life have announced today a competition to recognize the critical role that researchers, librarians, policymakers, doctors and other professionals play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries. The competition calls for case studies demonstrating how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

Over the last two decades, INASP and Research4Life have worked to close the information gap between developed and developing countries by providing free or low cost access to academic, scientific, and professional peer-reviewed content online and providing the necessary training to support researchers, practitioners, librarians and authors in building viable research ecosystems. The competition will run from June 28th to September 15th and highlight best practice in garnering support from leaders to improve the sustainability of this access and usage. Case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international partners from the INASP and Research4Life communities.

Julie Brittain, Executive Director of INASP says: “Since 2002, INASP has been working with libraries, library consortia and publishers to supply relevant and appropriate online literature to academics and researchers in all fields. Top level support from institutional leaders has enabled librarians to provide access to much needed content and to build awareness and use among academics, researchers and students. We are keen for all those involved to share stories of how they have gathered support from decision makers and budget holders, as this is the key to on-going, long term access to research literature.”

“Since 2001, Research4Life has been working to provide access to critical research in the developing world. Our reach has grown to 117 countries and 69,000 journals, books and databases, but we realize more than ever that it can only be truly sustainable if leaders “upstream” of practitioners, researchers, and librarians are equally supportive of this need,” said Richard Gedye, Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and Director of Outreach Programmes at the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, “Our competition aims to celebrate and share those advocacy successes.”

The INASP/Research4Life Advocacy Competition is open to all researchers, practitioners, librarians and policymakers whose institution is a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes  Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI or has access to research through an agreement mediated by INASP. Submissions will be accepted through http://www.research4life.org/research4life-inasp-advocacy-competition. The winner be announced in November and invited to present their work at the annual Publishers for Development conference and Research4Life General Partners Meeting in the UK in July 2017. Three contributing Research4Life partners have pledged prizes: Elsevier will provide the winner with a travel grant to cover their attendance at these meetings, SAGE Publishing has offered a one year subscription to a major reference work and Taylor & Francis will provide an honourable mention award.

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About INASP
INASP (www.inasp.info) is an international development charity working with a global network of partners to improve access, production and use of research information and knowledge, so that countries are equipped to solve their development challenges.

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to nearly 70,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Communications Coordinator
Research4Life
communications@research4life.org
@r4lpartnership

Alex Kealey,
Communications Officer
INASP
akealey@inasp.info
@INASPinfo

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A total of 69,000 online resources now available in Research4Life

26th May 2016

The total online resources available in Research4Life is going up

We are pleased to announce a new update in the number of online resources available through the Research4Life programes. In the last 18 months, the total count of material has risen up to 69,000, an increase of 42% from the latest count of 48,000.

The new number of resources includes new titles added to books, journals and other information material in the collections of the four Research4Life programmes –Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI-.

R4L_numbers_2016_all-02

Each of the Research4Life programs have updated number of resources with major additions in the AGORA collection. 15,000 new e-books related to chemistry, economics, geography and geology were added to AGORA now bringing the total number of books to up to 22,000.

You can access this range of resources by logging into your specific program using your institution’s credentials. If you are not registered yet find out if your institution is eligible and register now.

Hinari online resources
AGORA online resources
OARE online resources
ARDI online resources
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Namibia hosts Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Africa in the context of Sustainable Development Goals, 18 April 2016

12th April 2016

Namibia_WS

The second of four forums organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and partners, the forum is targeted at experts from senior government, academia and NGOs.


Strengthening access to agricultural science and technical information (Open Data and Open Science*) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is vital if Africa is to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to ending hunger, alleviating poverty, gender equality, climate change and health.

Due to challenges at both an institutional and national level much agriculture-related data produced in SSA isn’t visible or accessible, hindering any meaningful impact on food security in the region. A UN report found that in 2015 more than 40% of the population of SSA was still living in poverty and that the region faces daunting challenges with regards rapid population growth, high levels of poverty and conflicts.  Data has become a key asset for agricultural transformation in Africa. Indeed greater access to and sharing of agricultural data and science are two of the keys to unlocking change, allowing innovative solutions to be developed to address food insecurity and poverty on the continent.

However, in order for Open Data and Open Science initiatives to make any meaningful impact on SDGs and on the lives of Africans, most of whom make a living in the rural domain, they must draw together and galvanize players from the full agricultural spectrum.

An enabling environment where agricultural researchers and experts can share their innovations on open platforms is imperative. Farmers, rural populations and development specialists must also be empowered to adopt new innovative technologies and solutions aimed at combatting hunger and poverty in the region.

Sustainable Development Goals

As the eight Millennium Development Goals of the last 15 years came to a conclusion in 2015, a new set of transformative Sustainable Development Goals took their place. While the MDGs made huge strides on a global scale towards eradicating extreme poverty and inequality, development in SSA has been patchy and the challenge is now on to transform the demands of the new SDGs into action. 

Formally signed by the UN in September 2015 The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda included 17 new goals and 169 targets with individual governments expected to create national frameworks for achieving them.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon described the new SDGs as a “shared vision of humanity, and a to-do list for people and planet and a blueprint for success”.

The new SDGs go a step further than the MDGs, addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development. They place increased emphasis on the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection. With the spotlight increasingly on sustainability, Open Data and Open Science initiatives in agriculture in Africa come into even sharper focus. 


Namibia totemGoal of the forums

The chief objective of the forums is to provide a dialogue platform where senior agricultural experts in SSA can articulate some of the challenges to Open Data and Open Science and propose possible strategies.

The forum in Namibia, where around half the population depends largely on subsistence agriculture for a living and the national level of income inequality is one of the highest in the world, asks how enhancing access to Open Data and Science in agriculture can enable the country and indeed, SSA to fulfill SDGs.  

Senior experts in agriculture will:

  • exchange knowledge on institutional and national initiatives aimed at enhancing access to agricultural data science
  • share knowledge and discuss national global trends on data and science access
  • discuss potential mechanisms for enhanced knowledge sharing initiatives in agriculture in SSA.

Expected outcomes

  • A common understanding the role of open data and open science in achieving Africa’s SDGs. 
  • Clarification of the institutional, national and regional policy implications for open data and open science
  • Agreement on the mechanisms, technologies and standards for sharing open data and open science initiatives

Approach

Spearheaded by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO of the UN), the collective forums in Kenya (June 2015), Namibia (April 2016), Ghana (July 2016) and Tanzania (May 2016) gather together senior specialists from policy, research information and technology in agriculture and related fields. 

In Namibia two senior policy panel discussions will be followed by facilitated discussions in plenary. Panelists include high profile experts in agricultural and rural development, science, technology and library and information management from Namibia and the sub region.

Part II of the Namibia forum (19-20 April 2016) is a two-day workshop on access to scientific information in agriculture. Transforming the overarching theme of the forum into practical training sessions, the workshop is targeted at agriculture information workers with the core focus on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA)

The first forum in Kenya

44 participants gathered in Nairobi in June 2015 (see photo above) where they agreed that Open Science and Open Data requires an enabling environment framework, including appropriate policies and strategies on a governmental and institutional level. Furthermore, researchers and scientists required a more rewarding system that supports open publishing and collaborative research work, especially with regard to young scientists.

One of the key issues is a lack of understanding of the mechanics of Open Data and Open Science with unclear intellectual property rights policies leading to an “over protection” of data.

However, the forum highlighted several Kenyan initiatives already in place to support open science and to foster processes to improved access to agricultural data. Advocacy on an institutional and governmental level was a key recommendation and the Kenya Agricultural Information Network (KAINet) secretariat and member institutions are focused on driving this forward.

Scheduled follow-ups to the forum will be aimed at consolidating permanent dialogue between stakeholders.

Take a look at the full report

Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Nambia

The forum takes place on 18th April at the Avani Hotel in Windhoek, Namibia – speakers to be confirmed.  It is co-organized by FAO alongside the National University of Namibia (UNAM), GODAN, Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA), and Research4Life.

Since 1975 FAO has supported initiatives aimed at opening up access to agricultural data. It is currently working closely alongside several partners, including the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN), Open Agriculture Knowledge for Development (CIARD), and Research4Life to improve access to available agriculture and nutrition data, with a view to contributing to enhance food security in Africa.  All four forums are part of this initiative.

Forum dates:

Namibia: 18 – 20 April 2016
Tanzania: 23 – 25 May 2016
Ghana: 11 – 13 July 2016


*Open data is the idea that certain data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.

Open science is the umbrella term of the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge.”

Source: Wikipedia 

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Myanmar Universities Hosting Training Workshop on Access To Global Online Research in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 25-29 April 2016

12th April 2016

Yangon_University

FAO of the United Nations in conjunction with WorldFish and Research4Life is organizing two workshops at the University of Yangon and Yezin University in Myanmar this month. The workshops are aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, as well as providing access to information and research in these fields.


2015 marked a shift in scientific publishing. While the research community still has to compete for funding there is fresh emphasis on research data sets being “intelligently open” (otherwise known as Open Data*) so that others can use them. Since the adoption of the new 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda the question of Open Data and Open Science* – and in particular ways of accessing and managing those information sources, is at the forefront of the debate.

With the goal of drawing together experts from research organizations in Myanmar, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, WorldFish and Research4Life are organizing a series of workshops aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry. These workshops will look at ways that free access to information and research on agriculture, forestry and fisheries is provided, as well as supporting researchers in data management and publication. 

Myanmar: background

Myanmar_LakeFisheries play a crucial role as a source of livelihood for millions of people in Myanmar with fish being one of the most important food groups. Forestry regeneration in the country has the power to enhance the livelihood benefits of the population both through livelihood oriented forest management and marketing development.  

Although Myanmar is the largest country in South East Asia it also one of the poorest, with poverty disproportionately concentrated in rural areas where the majority of the population lives. Compounding this, visibility and access to information about poverty in Myanmar is lacking, making it hard to identify key restraints to the future development of aquaculture and forestry management, especially their role in alleviating poverty.  Emerging threats from population growth, conflict and climate change, particularly natural disasters, exacerbate the challenge.

According to a national survey on social protection and poverty reduction presented by the FAO in conjunction with Myanmar’s Department of Rural Development, priority in Myanmar should be given to vulnerable fishing communities for poverty reduction and rural development, particularly to increase access to appropriate and effective social assistance.

In the context of these overlapping demands there is a need for well-designed programs and projects that draw attention to the range of free agricultural information resources available to researchers. Strengthening access to agricultural, forestry and fisheries-related data, and indeed training people to use these research tools in Myanmar, has enormous potential to make a difference to people’s lives, as well as for the country to fulfill wider Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   

Myanmar totem

Workshops: approach

The main focus of the workshops is to introduce two databases: AGORA and the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology (AGRIS) – two research tools that give researchers in low-income countries access to a wealth of scientific research and information on agriculture.

The workshops will provide an overview of the overarching structure of the two databases, giving guidance on how best to search through the range of research materials.

A further section focuses on existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

In addition, day two of the Yangon University workshop features a special panel session on “Access to Scientific Information in Myanmar” with presentations from two speakers.

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Set up by FAO of the UN together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides developing countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, providing a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 low-income countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in developing countries.  Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network. Alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge. 

 The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI, AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provide developing countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online

ORGANIZERS

The organizers of these events are WorldFish, Research4Life, FAO of the United Nations, GODAN, University of Yangon and University of Yenzin.


Sources:
Elsevier
Asian Development Blog
World Food Programme
WorldFish

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Publisher of the Month: SAGE

5th April 2016

We are back with our Publisher of the Month section and this time the turn is for SAGE Publishing.

SAGE PublishingPublisher SAGE is an active publishing partner in the Research4Life network, closely aligned and committed to supporting the partnership’s mission to provide access and dissemination of research information to libraries and researchers in the developing world.

Sara Miller McCune founded SAGE in 1965 to support the dissemination of usable knowledge and educate a global community. Just over 50 years later, SAGE has become one of the world leading publishers for the social sciences with a growing portfolio of journals within the sciences, technology and medical disciplines and a rapidly growing selection of library products including archives, data, case studies and video.

Publisher Sage

“Library Value in the Developing World ” by SAGE

Central to SAGE’s mission since its founding has been a focus on a communities firmly believing that access to education creates healthy minds and cultures. This ethos sits at the heart of SAGE’s approach to both publishing and SAGE’s engagement with the community.

Partnership

Through Research4Life and its programmes, users in eligible countries can access nearly 900 journals from SAGE. In addition to access, SAGE also maintains an active relationship with various organisations to support both original research and training opportunities. SAGE has produced a series of white papers looking at the challenges faced by librarians in the developing world and as a result of this research provided training and support workshops to participating institutions.

Commitment

SAGE Publishing is proud to be a long term participant in and supporter of Research4Life.  SAGE was founded with the mission to support the dissemination of knowledge, and a strong belief that knowledge knows no frontiers. Research4Life, and the four programmes that it encompasses, provide integral support, training and access to high quality scholarly content for developing countries. Through Research4Life, researchers and students in developing nations have access to many of the world’s leading sources for science, knowledge and research. As a collaborative project between development agencies, universities and scholarly publishers, it is a great example of how research and development can be advanced by the joint efforts of the academic and publishing communities.  We look forward to continuing to be a part of this outreach by facilitating greater access and engagement with a wide range of scholarly and educational resources, supporting the sustainable development of these countries as academic centres in their own right.

Stephen Barr, President, SAGE International

Further information on SAGE Publishing’s Developing Countries Programme

Alongside SAGE’s partnership with Research4Life, the publisher is also closely aligned with several another developing world initiatives including; International Network for the Availability of Scientific Publications (INASP), and the eIFL Foundation. Most recently, the SAGE Premier Collection of journals was made available free of charge to Angola, Armenia, Cameroon, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, Maldives, Mali, Mongolia, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Uzbekistan.

For more information about SAGE’s partnership with any of these schemes please get in touch with Marianne Gill (Marianne.gill@sagepub.co.uk)

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Research4Life to partner with DOAJ to ensure the inclusion of quality open-access journals

23rd November 2015

DOAJ-03Research4Life and DOAJ announced today a working partnership that will help to ensure that the users of Research4Life will have access to the largest possible array of open access journals from publishers following a quality standard. The partnership will also help highlight the importance of peer reviewed open access material. The partnership reinforces the work that both organizations are already doing, and creates useful new synergies.

DOAJ is a white list of open access journals which seeks to increase the visibility and ease of use of open access scientific and scholarly journals, thereby promoting their increased usage and impact. The DOAJ aims to be comprehensive and cover all open access scientific and scholarly journals that use a quality control system to guarantee the content.

For some time now, the content team at Reasearch4Life, coordinated by Kimberly Parker of the World Health Organization, has seen an increasing amount of requests from open access publishers, particularly in the developing world, wanting to have their content included in the Research4Life programme portals which reach 8000 institutions spread over 100 low- and middle-income countries. The Research4Life team performs some basic checks on what content is included into its database and they are already sifting these applications to establish legitimate journals – work which has synergy with what DOAJ is doing in this area. Kimberly said: “We were already using DOAJ listings as a touchstone in assessing conformance with publishing standards; however, we hadn’t formalized the approach. In particular, we were not recommending that the publishers we turned away should review the DOAJ application requirements and work to fulfil them.”

DOAJ has built an expertise over more than eleven years in assessing and identifying quality, genuine open access journals, developing extensive criteria aimed at promoting best practice and transparency in academic publishing. Those criteria form the basis of the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing, a statement first published in 2013 and now widely used as a benchmark for quality, peer reviewed publishing.

The partnership between Research4Life and DOAJ will include the following activities.

  • From December 2015, Research4Life will only include new open access journals that are indexed in DOAJ. Journals requesting to be included in the Research4Life programmes must be indexed in DOAJ first. Over the coming year, the legacy open access journals in the Research4Life database will also be reviewed to confirm they are indexed by DOAJ.
  • Research4Life and DOAJ will collaborate on communicating with publishers not indexed in DOAJ referring them to the DOAJ application form.
  • Research4Life will highlight the DOAJ Best Practice statement for authors from the developing world to encourage them to consider publishing standards when selecting a journal for their publications.

Richard Gedye, Chair of Research4Life’s Executive Council, said:

I am happy that Research4Life can partner with DOAJ to ensure that high quality open access titles, particularly from the developing world, gain exposure through the Research4Life programmes. This is a wonderful opportunity to play to the strengths of both organizations.
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WHO’s HINARI program partners with Wolters Kluwer to provide UpToDate to Ebola-affected African countries

8th September 2015

Waltham, Massachusetts September 9th, 2015 – The World Health Organization (WHO)-hosted HINARI program announced a partnership with Wolters Kluwer to provide free access to UpToDate®, its evidence-based clinical decision support resource, to the three countries affected by Ebola (Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea) for an initial period of at least one year.

The main objective of this partnership is to build and strengthen capacity in those countries by providing their health workers with free access to the new developments in physician care, new research and up-to-date clinical information. Having access to the best available information at the point of care will enable them to make better patient management decisions and create resilient health systems able to withstand crisis events like those of the Ebola outbreak.

Beyond this partnership, the UpToDate team from Wolters Kluwer and WHO, along with other HINARI partners, will also be exploring guidance for WHO’s Member States on how their healthcare systems can harness the benefits of evidence-based clinical decision support systems by integrating them into the clinicians’ workflow effectively.

There is solid evidence of the impact that knowledge systems such as UpToDate have on improved outcomes in quality of care, hospital operational efficiencies and clinicians’ capacity building and skills. The WHO Strategy on Research for Health (2012) declares that “health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence.” By adopting innovative data solutions, low- and middle-income countries can leapfrog to a resilient state, bridging the healthcare gap and driving better patient outcomes across the territory.

UpToDate is the world’s premier online clinical decision support resource from the Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. Physician-editors synthesize the most recent medical information into evidence-based and actionable recommendations that clinicians trust to make the right patient management decisions at the point of care. Accessible online through any electronic device (laptop or mobile) UpToDate has been adopted by over 30,000 healthcare institutions across 174 countries worldwide and has become the de facto standard used to answer clinical questions at the point of care.

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About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (HINARI), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 60,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

André Rebelo
Manager, Global Public & Analyst Relations
UpToDate
Wolters Kluwer Health
Tel: +1.781.392.2411
Andre.Rebelo@WoltersKluwer.com
www.uptodate.com

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One Month of Free Access to Around 1,700 Scientific Journals

19th March 2015

If you are a researcher from an emerging region, you can register for the STAR program providing one month of free access to around 1,700 international and regional journals.

T&FThe STAR program provides access to a full range of journal titles by Taylor & Francis, one of our partners committed to increase the dissemination of scientific information to the developing world.

The content provided by STAR  complements the titles that our Research4Life programs – HINARI, AGORA, OARE and ARDI – provide for free or at a low cost to specific subject areas.

starOnce you register to STAR you will receive a voucher (one voucher is granted per recipient per year, and can only be redeemed once) that can be downloaded and activated when needed. Coverage spans Arts and Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Biological and Physical Sciences.

To be eligible for the STAR voucher you must reside in an eligible country. To go directly to the registration page click here.

Taylor & Francis also offers workshops for authors in collaboration with INASP’s AuthorAID. To know more about resources for researchers visit Taylor & Francis online.

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Publisher of the Month – Oxford University Press

11th March 2015

OUPOur Publisher of the Month is OUP (Oxford University Press). OUP is one of our founding partners providing its high-quality resources for free or at a low cost to eligible countries. In addition, OUP participates in a wide range of developing country initiatives, including INASP and eIFL, extending the reach of academic monographs and journals to more than 5,000 institutions in 100 low-income countries.

“Access to prestigious high quality journals and books from OUP has had a significant and positive impact on our efforts over the last 13 years by providing access to critical scientific research, significantly increasing the prospects of health and education in developing countries.”

Richard Gedye, Director of STM’s Outreach Programmes.

OUP offers access to over 285 prestigious and authoritative journals published in collaboration with some of the world’s most influential and scholarly professional societies. The 2015 Oxford Journals Collection includes cited journals in the fields of Medicine, Life Sciences, Humanities, Law, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences.

Online products are also available including:

You can view the complete list of titles here.

Training

The Librarian Resource Center  provides current librarians with training and technical support, including support in Spanish. Libraries in Sub-Saharan Africa receive training materials by ITOCA (The Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa) a capacity building and training organization. INASP network participants are provided with training workshops and materials of particular relevance to librarians.

Institutions will need an Internet connection of least 56kbps, Internet browsers, and a PDF Reader software.

Application

Librarians  or  staff members at institutions in developing countries can access OUP journals through the Research4Life programmes. If you  want to know more about the Developing Countries Initiative, training, and OUP products visit the OUP Librarian Resource Centre page or contact library.marketing@oup.com.

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New Mendeley Certification Program for Librarians

6th March 2015

With the new program librarians can get certified and obtain a Premium Upgrade for 500 users at their institution for free.

mendeleyMendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network that can help researchers organize their papers, collaborate with others online, and discover the latest news on their field. On the Mendeley platform, researchers can also create an academic profile and upload papers to publicize their research.

Librarians can also benefit from Mendeley. The new Certification Program for librarians is a self-study program that takes 15 – 20 hours to complete with rewards offered at each level. Each year, upon successful completion of the upgrading requirements, librarians get to continue with premium Mendeley access at no additional costs.

cert_rosette-smallI you would like to know more about the benefits of the Mendeley Certification Program for Librarians click here. To learn more about Mendeley check our training material or join the Research4Life/Mendeley group.

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Grey Literature resources

26th February 2015

What is Grey Literature?

Grey literature is defined as ‘that which is produced on all levels of government, academics, business and industry in print and electronic formats, but which is not controlled by commercial publishers.’[1]   Examples include technical reports from governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental agencies or research groups, working papers from research groups or preprints, thesis/dissertations and conference papers. Here we list some of the most useful tools to find Grey Literature related to science:

OpenDOARwww.opendoar.org

This resource is a directory of over 2600 academic open access repositories. The directory is run by the Centre for Research communications (CRC), University of Nottingham. Links to various resources are listed on the Country and Organizations access page.  Also available is a Search Repository Contents page.  These search results include links to the full-text documents.

Bielefeld Academic Search Engine (BASE)www.base-search.net

BASE is a search engine primarily for academic open access web resources. A resource of over 2600 academic open access repositories, BASE is operated by Bielefeld University Library (Germany). Initial search results are organized by relevancy with tools to further refine searches. The search results citations include links to the full-text documents.

Open Greywww.opengrey.eu

Open Grey, a consortium of numerous academic institutions in Europe, is a database of 700,000 grey literature references in Europe plus links to many full-text documents – technical or research reports, doctoral dissertations, conference papers and official publications. Search results are organized by author, organization, discipline, keyword, year and document type with access to the full-text documents.

WorldWideScience.orgworldwidescience.org

This is a global science gateway comprised of national and international scientific databases and portals that, for a keyword search, examines 99 sources. A multilateral partnership, the project was developed and is maintained by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, Department of Energy (USA). Search results are organized into papers, multimedia and data sections.   In the Topics section, one of the options is Full Text Articles. Note: search results for this gateway include links to commercially produced material that may be available from the various R4L program portals.

Please open these resources and decide which ones are most useful to your research needs.

 

[1] Grey Literature Report, New York Academy of Medicine, www.greylit.org/about (accessed 02 January 2015)

 


About the author

Lenny Rhine

Lenny Rhine

Since 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders®/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

 

 

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