About Research4Life

Eligibility

Registering

Getting Started

Other Information


About Research4Life

What is Research4Life?
Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HinariAGORAOARE and ARDI – that provides lower income countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed publications online. Research4Life is a public-private partnership of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Cornell and Yale University Libraries, the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers (STM) and more than 195 international scientific publishers. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between higher income countries and lower income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research for Health (Hinari), Research for Agriculture (AGORA), Research for the Environment (OARE) and Research for Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 lower income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 68,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

Who administers Research4Life?

Each programme is administered separately:

  • AGORA is coordinated by FAO on behalf of its many public and private partners.
  • Hinari is coordinated by WHO on behalf of its many public and private partners.
  • OARE is coordinated by UNEP on behalf of its many public and private partners.
  • ARDI is coordinated by WIPO on behalf of its many public and private partners.


When was Research4Life started?
Research4Life started with the launch of Hinari in 2001.

How can we gauge the importance of Research4Life?
One way is to look at scholarly output in nations with Hinari/AGORA/OARE/ARDI access. While a cause-and-effect relationship can’t be established, such access may be a factor in a nation’s increase in scholarly output… Countries benefiting from Hinari (for example) — launched in 2001 and providing journal access since 2002 — have seen a massive increase in the number of authors publishing in international peer-reviewed journals, well in excess of the increase seen in the remaining nations of the world. When looking at the number of authors publishing in peer-reviewed journals over the five-year period 2002–2006, we see 38% growth for non-Hinari countries but 63% growth for those signed up to Hinari. When looking at the number of authors publishing in peer-reviewed journals over the five-year period 1997–2001, we see a growth rate of 20% for both sets of countries.

A 2010 Research4life user experience review revealed that more respondents (24%) cite HINARI as a source for life-science and medical research than cite any other source, while more respondents (32%) cite HINARI as the source they use most frequently. For agricultural research, AGORA similarly tops the list of resources used, with equivalent figures of 27% and 54% respectively.

Another way is to look at feedback from our users. Over the years, we have gathered a regular flow of feedback from our users, documenting the positive impacts that access to our content has had on them, their research, their communities and their countries’ development – see The Research4Life Making a Difference Booklet for some examples.

How long will Research4Life continue?
The publishers are committed to working with Research4Life in its current format at least until the end of 2020. At that time, the initiative will be reviewed and adapted as needed.

What do Group A and Group B Countries mean?
Local, not-for-profit institutions in two groups of countries, areas and territories may register for access to the publications through Research4Life. The two lists (Group A and Group B) are based on four factors: Gross National Income (GNI) (World Bank figures), Gross National Income per capita (GNIpc), United Nations Least Developed Countries (LDCs) List and Human Development Index (HDI). More Information

How much does it cost to use each Research4Life Programme?
– If your institution is in a Group A (free access) country, area or territory, then Research4Life is free. If your institution is in a Group B (low-cost access) country, area or territory, Research4Life costs US $1500 per institution per calendar year (from January through December). All institutions registering from Group B are entitled to a six month trial.

– If your institution is in Group B (low-cost access) country, and you cannot or choose not to pay the annual fee, your institution will still be eligible for free access to a small number of information resources.

Please note that for some countries there can be exceptions to eligibility for publications from some publishers.

Who are the partners?
The Research4Life partners include the world’s leading scientific publishers, WHO, FAO, UNEP, WIPO, Cornell and Yale University Libraries, STM and other technical partners. See Partners page.

What are the requirements for becoming a partner publisher?
The main requirements for participation are that the content be in a subject of relevance to one of the fields of Research4Life initiative (see AGORA, HINARI, OARE and ARDI separately), and that any content be available online in full text or equivalent versions for non-journal literature. Please write to us at info@research4life.org for further details on submitting your content to one of the Research4Life Programmes.

Eligibility

Who is eligible to register for Research4Life?
Each Programme (Hinari, AGORA, OARE, ARDI) accepts registrations separately only from institutions in Group A and Group B countries, areas and territories. The programmes do not accept registrations from individuals. Eligible institutions are: national universities, professional schools (medicine, agriculture, pharmacy, public health, engineering, etc.), research institutes, teaching  hospitals and healthcare centers, government offices, national libraries, agricultural extension centers and local non-governmental organizations.

How can I find out if my institution is in a country eligible to participate?
You can consult the list of eligible countries, areas and territories that are eligible to participate in Research4Life.

How does Research4Life determine which countries, areas or territories are eligible?
The eligibility of a country is recognized in two country lists (Group A and Group B ) and based on four factors: Gross National Income (GNI) (World Bank figures), Gross National Income per capita (GNIpc) (World Bank figures), United Nations Least Developed Countries (LDCs) List and Human Development Index (HDI). More information

How do I know if my library qualifies for access to Research4Life?
Generally, publicly funded and non-profit institutions in the eligible countries, areas and territories can gain access to publications in these collections.

Why are the lists of eligible countries, areas or territories based on GNI data and other statistics?
Eligibility is currently based on four independent factors: Gross National Income (GNI) (World Bank figures), Gross National Income per capita (GNIpc) (World Bank Figures), United Nations Least Developed Countries (LDCs) List and Human Development Index (HDI). We recognize that these figures may change from year to year, and we monitor developments with regular reviews. We will publicize any changes that are made to the current criteria.

How can I access information if I live in a lower income country, area or territory that is not eligible for Research4Life?
Even if you are not eligible for full access to one of the Research4Life programmes, there are many free, full-text references listed on each Programme’s website. The abstracts of all journals listed on the Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI websites are freely accessible to all users. You do not need a username to access these or any listed open access resources. In addition you may want to research what is available through other initiatives.

Registering

My country is not eligible and my institution is willing to pay for access. How can I do that?
Research4Life is a beneficiary programme specifically for lower income countries, areas or territories and the programmes cannot provide subscription service. We recommend that institutions in countries like yours form library consortia, and that these consortia negotiate agreements directly with the publishers. We encourage this process to include institutions without much capacity in any deals.

How can I find out which institutions in a country are participating in Research4Life programmes?
The programmes maintain lists of registered academic institutions which are available to consult.

Once an institution is registered, who can access Hinari, AGORA, OARE or ARDI?
All members (researchers, teaching and administrative staff, students) of a registered institution, and its on-site visitors, are eligible to access the programmes as long as they abide by the guidelines within the license agreement.

Getting Started

What are the technical requirements for accessing Hinari, AGORA, OARE, ARDI content?
Users need computers connected to the Internet. The Hinari, AGORA, OARE, ARDI portals works with Internet Explorer Version 6.0 or higher and equivalent browsers. Users also need a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader to access journal articles in PDF. The reader is available for free at www.adobe.com.

Other Information

Are there other initiatives for accessing online journals?
In addition to Research4Life programmes – Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI – there are several other programmes which allow users from lower income countries to access online journals for free or low-cost. You may find more information on the Liblicense Developing Nations Initiatives Web page. In addition, on the programme portals, the “Other Free Collections” section includes links to journals available free to all users.