Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Learn more about ARDI, Research4Life’s programme for Development and Innovation

8th May 2013

ARDI (Access to Research for Development and Innovation) is coordinated by the World Intellectual Property Organization together with its partners in the publishing industry with the aim to promote the integration of developing and least developed countries into the global knowledge economy, allowing them to more fully realize their creative and innovative potential. By improving access to scholarly literature from diverse fields of science and technology, the ARDI programme is designed to reinforce the knowledge infrastructure in developing and least developed countries and to support researchers in these countries in creating and developing new solutions to technical challenges faced on a local and global level. Learn more

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TEDMED Highlights Research4Life as it Announces Final Speaker Lineup

22nd April 2013

TEDMED referenced Research4Life as part of its achievement to simulcast conference globally to 50 countries and 2,500 Organizations.

See more

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TEDMED enjoyed by Research4Life Users and Partners for free 16-19 April

19th March 2013

 

At Research4Life, we are always looking for ways to help our members and partners.  This year we had a very special opportunity to bring TEDMED to everyone on 16-21 April.

TEDMED (www.tedmed.com)  is the famous, multidisciplinary gathering at the John F. Kennedy Center in Washington DC (16-19 April) where world-class thinkers and doers inspire and share their ideas and vision in medicine, global health, wellness and overall quality of life issues.

TEDMED Live is an extraordinary offering that TEDMED had agreed to give away for free to all the Research4Life institutions so that all participants in R4L had the chance to join the event remotely in real-time or on-demand.

As a thank you to all the partners of Research4Life, TEDMED made TEDMEDLive available free of charge.

Learn more about TEDMED. Download the brochure here.

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Research4Life and its impact on Agronomist’s work in Burkina Faso

12th March 2013

Dr Sami Hyacinthe Kambire, a researcher from Burkina Faso, shares how Research4Life as helped him to develop better and more informed scientific writing skills, produce focused research that he can discuss with top researchers worldwide, compete more effectively for research funding, and deliver better teaching programmes.

 

 

 

 

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RESEARCH4LIFE ANNOUNCES CONTEST HIGHLIGHTING LIBRARY IMPACT

6th March 2013

For Release: March 6th 2013

Contact:       Charlotte Masiello-Riome,  Research4Life Communications communications@research4Life.org 

Follow R4L on Twitter at  @R4LPartnership


Global case study competition focuses on how vital collaboration between Research4Life and librarians powers effective research in developing countries.

London, United Kingdom 6 March 2013 – The Research4Life partnership announced today a case study competition to recognize the role of librarians and library staff in building the research capacities of scientists, doctors and policymakers and helping to boost research output within their institutions.

Since 2001, the Research4Life initiative has developed into a partnership of over 200 scientific publishers around the globe, giving researchers at more than 6,000 institutions in over 100 developing world countries and territories free or low cost online access to nearly 30,000 peer-reviewed international scientific journals, books, and databases provided by the world’s leading scientific, technical and medical publishers.

Research4Life has launched the library impact case study competition in celebration of the work that librarians do and to facilitate the sharing of best practice. The competition aims to highlight the dedication and capacity building of those who assist researchers in accessing and using vital information within their institutions.  The competition will run from the 6th of March through the 27th of April 2013.  Online applications will be accepted through April 27th 12 am GMT.  Submissions of library case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international librarians and trainers. Thewinner will be announced in June and invited as the first user to join the Research4Life Executive Council. The prize includes an all-expenses paid trip to attend the Partners’ General Meeting in Rome, Italy in September 2013.

 

“From information literacy training to building infrastructure and concerted outreach, librarians are critical to building a healthy research culture in the developing world—and they are often the unsung heroes,” said Emily Gillingham, Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and Director of Library Relations at Wiley, “We hope our competition will raise awareness about the essential role played by librarians across the developing world.”

The Research4Life Librarian Competition is open to all librarians and library staff whose institution is a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes  Access to Research in Health (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) and Access to Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI). Eligible countries, areas, and territories are available on the Research4Life website.

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Notes to Editors:
The
online application form will be open for submissions from March 6th through the 27th of April 2013.  In 2011, Research4Life celebrated HINARI’s 10th anniversary and produced “Making a Difference”,  case studies about the impact of Research4life on scientists, doctors, nurses and librarians.  Interviews with the Research4Life partners and programme managers are available upon request.

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About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers, Cornell and Yale Universities in collaboration with the WHO, FAO, UNEP, WIPO, and technology partner, Microsoft.  Research4Life aims to help attain six of the UNs eight Millennium Development Goals by 2015, reducing the scientific knowledge gap between industrialized countries and the developing world.  Since 2001, the four programmes, Access to Research in Health (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) and Access to Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI), have grown and developed  to the point where they now give researchers at more than 6,000 institutions in over 100 developing world countries and territories free or low cost online access to nearly 30,000 peer-reviewed international scientific journals, books, and databases provided by the world’s leading science publishers.

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Research4Life helps charity improve lives of HIV-infected orphans- Zambia

21st February 2013

In 2003, a woman with AIDS, seven months pregnant and living in a bus terminal in the Zambian capital of Lusaka, was found by nuns and brought to a shelter. After delivering the baby, physician Tim Meade and a team of volunteers looked after the child. Unable to care for her newborn son, the mother turned to “Dr Tim”. As a sign of gratitude, she named the boy Tim. Thus was germinated the idea for Tiny Tim & Friends (TT&F), an organization that specializes in paediatric HIV/AIDS clinical care.
HIV/AIDS takes an enormous toll on Zambia. In Lusaka, around one quarter of the adult population are infected and there are tens of thousands of AIDS-related deaths each year. Mother-to-child transmission is a major route of infection, with more than 14 000 children infected nationally in 2010, out of 80 000 newborns exposed. Tragically, the country is also home to a million AIDS orphans. TT&F screens orphans for HIV in vulnerable communities surrounding Lusaka and provides anti-retroviral drugs, which suppress the HIV virus and stop the progression of AIDS. The charity currently serves almost 500 children and their caregivers through its medical and psychosocial care programme.
Research4Life plays a major role in TT&F’s work, allowing research that informs the development of policies and medical procedures that provide the best possible treatment. Access to HINARI has also allowed the charity to obtain essential information about groups performing related research in similar settings. According to Dr Meade, this makes a big difference in resource-poor areas where published data are often unavailable. “Every issue of just three of the journals accessed through HINARI – AIDS, Journal of Infectious Diseases and Journal of Acquired Immunodeficiency – contain papers relevant to resourcelimited settings and TT&F’s work,” he says.
One of the key policies developed by Dr Meade and his team through their HINARI-assisted research is that mothers with HIV should continue to breastfeed their babies until two years of age, if stable on anti-retroviral medications. This allows children to thrive with minimal risk of the infection. Another is that social workers and their training are crucial to the success of TT&F – training and empowering them leads to the best outcomes for the mothers and children. By providing high-quality medical care and personalized intensive adherence plans, TT&F allows patients to access the medical and social assistance they need, thus prolonging their lives and reducing the transmission of HIV in Zambia.

Text from the book, Making a Difference, available at http://www.research4life.org/case-studies/stories-from-the-field/

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Over 12,000 Wiley Online Books Made Available in Developing Countries Via Research4Life

6th February 2013

Media Contact:
Ben Norman (UK) +44 (0) 1243 770 375

Amy Molnar (US) +1 201-748-8844
sciencenewsroom@wiley.com

 

Over 12,000 Wiley Online Books Made Available in Developing Countries Via Research4Life

Hoboken, NJ, February 6, 2013, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced that its 12,200 Online Books would be made available through the Research4Life initiatives of HINARI, AGORA and OARE, benefitting research and academic communities in 80 low- and middle-income countries including Malawi, Cambodia, and Bolivia.

Research4Life provides 6,000 institutions in developing countries with free or low cost access to peer-reviewed online content from the world’s leading scientific, technical and medical publishers. The addition of Wiley’s Online Books brings the total number of peer reviewed scientific journals, books and databases now available through the public-private Research4life partnership to almost 30,000.

“Our goal with Research4Life is to provide and support quality research in developing countries in order to advance higher education, inform public policy decisions and ultimately improve quality of life,” said Emily Gillingham, Director of Library Relations at Wiley who also serves as the new Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life. “We hope the addition of this vast collection of Online Books will make a real difference to researchers in countries which can least afford it and as such is a central part of Wiley’s social responsibility program”.

“Through Research4Life we’ve been able to really level the playing field in terms of access to primary research material in the developing world”, said Kimberly Parker, HINARI Programme Manager at the World Health Organization.  “This is vital for supporting local authorship and helping researchers in poorer countries to participate in and contribute to the global scientific knowledge base”.

The Wiley Online Books Collection includes handbooks, dictionaries, companions, encyclopedias and landmark book series from award-winning authors and renowned researchers in the life, health and physical sciences, social sciences and the humanities.  Online Books are available on Wiley Online Library and offer the benefits of unlimited concurrent user access, cross-searching with journals, and no DRM restrictions.  Access to the majority of Wiley’s peer-reviewed journals, the Cochrane Library, Current Protocols and major reference works are already included in the Research4Life programmes.

“We are delighted to be able to add Wiley’s books to Research4Life for access by researchers in eighty countries across Africa, Latin America, and Asia”, said Antonia Seymour, VP and Director of Science, Technical, Medical and Scholarly Books at Wiley.  “Not only will they have access to our 12,200 Online Books already digitized but we will also be adding the 100 or so new books published each month”, she added.

 

More Information:

Case studies about the impact of Research4life on scientists, doctors, nurses and librarians can be found in the 2012, “Making a Difference” booklet. Interviews with the Research4Life partners and program managers are available upon request.

URL: http://www.research4life.org/competitionbook

About Reseach4Life:
Since 2001, the four programmes, Access to Research in Health (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) and Access to Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI), have grown and developed  to the point where they now give researchers at more than 6,000 institutions in over 100 developing world countries and territories free or low cost online access to almost 30,000 peer-reviewed international scientific journals, books, and databases provided by the world’s leading science publishers

URL: www.research4life.org

Contact Reseach4Life:

Charlotte Masiello-Riome

Research4Life Communications Coordinator

communications@research4life.org

 

About Wiley:

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfil their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace.

 

Wiley is a global provider of content and content-enabled workflow solutions in areas of scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly research; professional development; and education. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s Web site can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com. The Company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb.

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Interview with Gracian Chimwaza, Executive Director ITOCA, South Africa and Research4Life Training Coordinator

8th January 2013

Gracian Chimwaza, is the founding director for ITOCA-Information Training & Outreach Centre for Africa www.itoca.org. He holds a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) degree from Thames Valley University, UK (2001), an electrical engineering diploma and a graduate diploma from Institute of Marketing Management (IMM). He is currently a PhD candidate at the Department of Information Science, University of Pretoria.  In the last 13 years, Chimwaza has undertaken extensive ICT outreach, capacity building and research missions in many African countries focusing on library e-resources access through the Research4Life and TEEAL programmes. He currently serves on the Research4Life Programs Executive Council, the IAALD Africa Executive Board and is also Chair of the International Advisory Group for the Mobilising Knowledge for Development (MK4D), Institute for Development Studies (UK). He has been an invited speaker in many international, regional and national-level policy meetings that address ICTs, knowledge sharing and capacity building in Africa.

  • How long have you been training in regards to the Research4Life Programmes? What are your focus countries?
    Since April 2004, and the focus countries have been Sub-Sahara Africa (in all four region, East, West, Central and Southern Africa)  
  • What has been some of the benefits you have seen directly from your training? Increased registrations for the R4L programs and usage of the programs in countries we have held training workshop?How has the training translated to capacity building for your institutions?
    Our approach is a train-the-trainer model and it’s been incredibly encouraging over the years to see participants go on to share the acquired skills with their colleague librarians, researchers and faculty when they return to their institutions after the workshops. The has helped to get the R4L word out to reach thousands at research and academic institutions across Africa.   
  • How has the training continued? (ie. Train the trainer)
    To date, ITOCA has conducted about 85 train-the-trainer workshops in attended by about 3,000 participants in 28 countries.  We estimate that the trained participants have reached at least 15,000 downstream as a result of the training workshops.  
  • How many institutes do you normally train in a year timespan, and what counties/cities have you done in the last six months?
    We have conducted 4 workshops in the last 6 months and on average ITOCA conducts 7-8 national workshops annually.

 

If you are interested in the Research4Life Train the Trainer Programme, contact

 

 

 

 

 

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Research4Life Newsletter November 2012

1st January 2013

Table of Contents

 

 


Note from the Editor

Welcome to this latest edition of our Research4Life Partner Newsletter. Our goal is to ensure that you can stay up to speed on the latest developments in Research4Life and to enable you as partners to fully leverage and promote your participation.  In this issue you’ll find updates on some of the issues which were discussed in our July General Partners Meeting as well as a trainer’s spotlight on Lenny Rhine of the MLA/Librarians Without Borders.

We are delighted to welcome the new Chair of the Executive Council, Emily Gillingham, Director of Library Relations at Wiley and founding Research4Life partner. In this month’s newsletter, Emily shares her first ‘Chairman’s Report.’ We also heartily thank our outgoing Chair, Kimberly Parker, HINARI programme manager, for her past two years of (additional) tireless service to the partnership.

In November, Research4Life launched a revamped website at www.research4life.org.  A giant thanks to Charlotte Masiello Riome, our Research4Life Communications Coordinator for singlehandedly managing this process-and to WIPO for their material and moral support for our vastly improved outreach channel.  Our new online home will host news, testimonials, case studies and programme information and will give us the flexibility to add further resources, such as training materials, in the future.  The website will also host our new social media channels on Facebook and Twitter. Please follow us at www.twitter.com/R4LPartnership and ‘like’ us at www.facebook.com/R4Lpartnership!  We would really appreciate it if you could share these sites with your social media marketing colleagues to help us extend our networks and share news.

Ylann Schemm, Chair of the Research4Life Communications and Marketing Team; Senior Corporate Responsibility Manager, Elsevier

Note from the New Chair of Executive Council

After 10 years working on Research4Life I’m delighted to have recently taken on the Chairmanship of the Executive Council.  Kimberly Parker of WHO set an extremely high bar in this role and has propelled Research4Life to now encompass four distinct programmes with books and other resources now also available in more than 6000 institutions worldwide.  She has pushed through critical technological improvements to the service and will continue to play an important part in the evolution of the programmes.  On behalf of the Executive Council and all the partners I would like to extend our great thanks to Kim for all that she has done for Research4Life.

There are also some clear areas of focus for us over the coming period.  For example, a new CRM system is being implemented which has the potential to radically improve the way in which access is delivered.  It will also be a tool which we can leverage to improve our communications with librarians and information officers in the recipient institutions in order to support greater dialogue and usage of the resources.  This fits with our strategic goal to build engagement with librarians and researchers in the developing countries and examples of plans in this area include developing a Librarian Advisory Board for Research4Life and bringing users onto the Executive Council.  The recent case study booklet and videos, all available on the newly revamped www.research4life.org  site, amply show how the programmes have made an impact on clinical practice, public policy and higher education.  We will continue to work with the user community and our partners to improve outreach, training, access and outcomes.

Many of you will have seen our press release this week announcing the extended commitment that our Partners have made to support Research4Life through 2020.  This long term sustainability is a critical element of the initiative, giving eligible institutions the justification and confidence to make related investments in necessary networked systems, teaching staff, labs and research projects.  It is this long term commitment that is making the difference to Research4Life’s effectiveness.  As one of the beneficiaries, Gamal Khalafalla Mohamed Ali, Director General of Sudan’s Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation, says; “As a policymaker, I use research published in HINARI for formulating research-based policies. I have written many proposals and most of these find their way to implementation. A major reason for this, I think is the evidence that underpins the proposals. To me HINARI is like water and oxygen: it is vital for me.”

It’s a pleasure to work with so many others on a project which delivers something like water and oxygen.  Thank you for your continued support.

Emily Gillingham is the Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and has been involved in the initiative, particularly the marketing and communications side, since soon after its launch.  She is also Director of Library Relations at Wiley, working to support engagement with this key audience and to deliver services which meet the needs of librarians and information professionals.  In this role she runs Wiley’s international network of Customer Advisory Boards.  Emily is also a member of the COUNTER marketing committee and has been a member of the STM communications committee.

Core offer revised eligibility criteria

This July, the General Partners Meeting revised the eligibility criteria for countries, areas, and territories in our Core offer with one additional criterion – Total GNI (World Bank figures).  The main purpose of the revision is to use clear third-party indicators to provide the basis on which some countries have been classified as ineligible for our Core offer.

At the same time, the inclusion of the total GNI factor enabled us to include very tiny economies, or smaller economies with slightly higher GNI per capita numbers.  The newly eligible or reinstated countries for 2013 are:  Botswana; Dominica; Gabon; Grenada; Mauritius; Montenegro; Palau; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines; and Seychelles.  The new eligibility criteria can be found at

 


Partners commit to 2020

During the July 2012 Research4Life General Partners Meeting in Washington DC, the partners reaffirmed and extended their commitment to Research4life beyond 2012 for an additional 8 years. A press release announcing the partners’ renewed commitment through 2020 and showcasing achievements was released on November 15th. “As the world community looks beyond the Millennium Development Goal milestone dates, the Research4Life partnership is setting an example by ensuring sustainability of these important information access initiatives through 2020.”

 


Transitional Path Offer – A new opt-in for publisher partners

The General Partners Meeting this summer also approved a new “Transitional Path Option” from January 2013. The goal of the Transitional Path Offer is to ensure a gradual transition for the types of institution likely to be rarely involved in countrywide consortia deals as countries graduate from eligibility for the Research4Life Core Offer but remain in less developed states. In order to ensure all the components are properly in place, we will roll out this new option initially for the HINARI programme only.

In the Transitional Path countries, institutional eligibility will be limited to national (local) non-governmental organizations (NGOs) or agriculture extension centres that are not also research institutes, educational organizations, or major government offices.

As the Transitional Path Offer is just beginning, many publishers are carefully examining their current arrangements and positions in the involved countries.  Publishers will be assumed not to be participating in this Transitional Path Offer unless they ask to opt in.  We anticipate that the numbers of information resources on offer and the number of institutions who will register for the access will both remain small for at least the coming year.  The following countries fit the criteria initially established for eligibility for the Transitional Path –  Belarus; Bulgaria; Costa Rica; Cuba; Egypt;  Indonesia; Iran; Lebanon; Pakistan; Panama; Philippines; Serbia; South Africa; and Thailand.

http://www.who.int/hinari/eligibility/transitional_path_offer_of_hinari/en/index.html

More Research4Life case studies come to the small screen

Interactive Africa will be bringing us a number of new videos in the coming months, including interviews with Research4Life users Dr Sami Hyacinthe Kambire, an agronomist in Burkina Faso’s Institute for Environment and Agricultural Research and Dr. Tim Meade (Tiny Tim & Friends) who is working to improve the lives of HIV-infected children in Zambia. The videos will bring audiences to the field and into the lives of those benefiting from the Research4Life programmes. This series of three videos has been sponsored by the BMJ Group, Microsoft, Wiley and Elsevier. If you are interested in sponsoring the creation of a video, please contact info@research4life.org<mailto:info@research4life.org

For up to date Research4life videos and case studies, visit http://www.research4life.org/case-studies/

Interview with Research4Life’s Lenny Rhine – A leading example in Training the Trainers

Since June 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders(r)/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

What have been some of the benefits you have seen directly from your training?

Some of the visible or tangible benefits are just observing the participants gain the skills to utilize the Research4Life resources.  I’ve seen researchers and physicians find a valuable article and proceed to read it completely instead of completing their training course assignments.  Hospital residents have spent hours using the evidence-based medicine resources as they are obtaining invaluable information for use upon returning to the hospital’s wards.  Health information professionals realize the value of the programmes and understand their role as teachers.  After a national workshop, there is increased usage of Research4Life programmes by the institutions represented.  We also see an increase in registrations.

How has the training translated to capacity building for your institutions?

As Gracian mentioned in the June2012 Partner newsletter, the goal of the train-the-trainer mode is to give the participants the skills so that they can use the Research4Life materials and also instruct others when they return to their institutions.   Besides the specific usage skills, we also teach marketing /promotion strategies and ask the participants to apply them at their institutions. In future workshops, we plan to discuss specific outcomes that will be surveyed at six and twelve months.

Since 2008, we also have conducted training for individuals from developed countries whose institutions have linkages in Research4Life eligible institutions.  Besides approximately 10 workshops, participants have developed 2 training modules and a series of HINARI training videos.

 

How has the training continued? (i.e. Train the trainer)

In the past 5+ years, LWB has conducted 50+ workshops in 23 countries with an average attendance of 25 people.  As previously mentioned, many of these are in conjunction with ITOCA or sponsored by WHO regional offices.  To reach individuals who are unable to attend formal workshops, we have developed online Short Courses for HINARI, AGORA and OARE.  These courses are available on the ITOCA and MLA Moodle servers. Via group email messages, I also continue to communicate with participants from workshops for the past three years.  These messages keep them informed about new Research4Life developments and new/updated training material.

 

How many institutes do you normally train in a year timespan, and what counties/cities have you done in the last six months?

LWB has conducted 6 workshops in the last 6 months in Namibia, Nepal and Viet Nam.  The ones in Viet Nam were collaborations with the World Intellectual Property Organization.  The normal rate is 4 or 5 training sites per year with 8 to 10 workshops. In June, LWB and ITOCA taught a HINARI distance learning course in English, French and Portuguese.  71 individuals completed the online course.

Donate to HINARI and support Research4Life

We are always asked by partners to suggest different ways that individuals and society members can contribute to Research4life. We are grateful for your current participation, and are pleased to announce an additional way in which you can further enhance your support for the developing world. If you, your organization, or any of your society members would like to contribute funds towards programme activities, you can donate to this account and support Research4Life: http://www.who.int/hinari/donation/en/

Lancet – Access to content online

The Lancet now also separately available on Research4life

As a founding partner Elsevier continues to extend its content contribution to Research4Life and is delighted to announce that The Lancet is now also separately available to all countries in the Research4life programmes.  The Lancet believes that everyone has the right to the highest attainable standard of health and that care should be equitable and just. This initiative will ensure that The Lancet’s extensive portfolio of high quality global health related content is available to those who really need it.   It allows users of Research4Life to view all Lancet journals’ content on The Lancet website, and be free to browse its specialty Collections, and Global Health and Clinical Series on www.thelancet.com.

New and improved Research4Life website launches

Research4Life is proud to announce a newly enhanced website has been launched at www.Research4Life.org. Thank you to the World Intellectual Property Organization for their support in making this a reality.

The website continues to grow, and in the near future will provide extensive information on training activities, increased multimedia featuring our users, and enhanced communication tools for partners to promote the Research4Life initiative to their organizations, their partners, and the rest of the world.

Interesting latest facts

  • ARDI: training remains a key theme for WIPO and ARDI, with 20 workshops having been conducted and an additional 30 planned for this year.
  • 2013 will mark AGORA’s 10 year anniversary.
  • Research4Life currently brings the contents of over 10,000 peer-reviewed scientific journals and some 7,000 books to researchers in the developing countries.
  • For 78 of the world’s poorest countries subscription charges are waived, while for a further 28 countries they are discounted by over 99%.
  • Over 6,000 institutions are currently registered for access to content available through Research4Life.

 

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Lenny Rhine – A leading example in Training the Trainers

28th November 2012

Since June 2006, Lenny has been holding training workshops all over the world for the Research4Life programmes with financial support from various organizations, including WHO, ITOCA and in collaboration with the Librarians Without Borders®/Medical Library Association (LWB/MLA). Lenny has held training workshops all over the world, including sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and South Pacific, as well as English speaking countries in the Americas and Eastern Europe.

What have been some of the benefits you have seen directly from your training?

Some of the visible or tangible benefits are just observing the participants gain the skills to utilize the R4L resources.  I’ve seen researchers and physicians find a valuable article and proceed to read it completely instead of completing their training course assignments.  Hospital residents have spent hours using the evidence-based medicine resources as they are obtaining invaluable information for use upon returning to the hospital’s wards.  Health information professionals realize the value of the programmes and understand their role as teachers.  After a national workshop, there is increased usage of R4L programmes by the institutions represented.  We also see an increase in registrations.

How has the training translated to capacity building for your institutions?

Training session in NepalAs Gracian mentioned in the June2012 Partner newsletter, the goal of the train-the-trainer mode is to give the participants the skills so that they can use the R4L materials and also instruct others when they return to their institutions.   Besides the specific usage skills, we also teach marketing /promotion strategies and ask the participants to apply them at their institutions. In future workshops, we plan to discuss specific outcomes that will be surveyed at six and twelve months.
Since 2008, we also have conducted training for individuals from developed countries whose institutions have linkages in R4L eligible institutions.  Besides approximately 10 workshops, participants have developed 2 training modules and a series of HINARI training videos.

How has the training continued? (i.e. Train the trainer)

In the past 5+ years, LWB has conducted 50+ workshops in 23 countries with an average attendance of 25 people.  As previously mentioned, many of these are in conjunction with ITOCA or sponsored by WHO regional offices.  To reach individuals who are unable to attend formal workshops, we have developed online Short Courses for HINARI, AGORA and OARE.  These courses are available on the ITOCA and MLA Moodle servers. Via group email messages, I also continue to communicate with participants from workshops for the past three years.  These messages keep them informed about new R4L developments and new/updated training material.

How many institutes do you normally train in a year timespan, and what counties/cities have you done in the last six months?

LWB has conducted 6 workshops in the last 6 months in Namibia, Nepal and Vietnam.  The ones in Vietnam were collaborations with the World Intellectual Property Organization.  The normal rate is 4 or 5 training sites per year with 8 to 10 workshops. In June, LWB and ITOCA taught a HINARI distance learning course in English, French and Portuguese.  71 individuals completed the online course.

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RESEARCH4LIFE PUBLISHER PARTNERS COMMIT TO FREE AND LOW COST ACCESS THROUGH 2020

14th November 2012

18,000 resources available to the developing world via the HINARI, AGORA, OARE, and ARDI programmes

For Release: 14th  November 2012

For Information, contact: Charlotte Masiello-Riome, Research4Life Communications Coordinator, communications@research4life.org

London, United Kingdom – London, November 14th, 2012 – The Research4Life partners announced today that they have agreed to extend their partnership through 2020. Research4Life (www.research4life.org) currently provides over 6,000 institutions in more than 100 developing countries with free or low cost access to peer-reviewed online content from the world’s leading scientific, technical and medical publishers. The renewed commitment will ensure that the 18,000 peer reviewed scientific journals, books and databases now available through the public-private Research4life partnership will continue to reach research communities in low- and middle-income countries.

Nearly 200 scientific, technical and medical publishers worldwide participate in Research4Life. Since the programme’s launch in 2001, no publisher has withdrawn support from the partnership. A 2010 survey which formed part of a Research4life user experience review, revealed that more respondents (24%) cite HINARI as a source for life-science and medical research than cite any other source, while more respondents (32%) cite HINARI as the source they use most frequently. For agricultural research, AGORA similarly tops the list of resources used, with equivalent figures of 27% and 54% respectively.

 

One of the beneficiaries of Research4life, Gamal Khalafalla Mohamed Ali Director General of Sudan’s Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation who heads the national government agency responsible for medical supplies to all public health institutions commented, “As a policymaker, I use research published in HINARI for formulating research-based policies. I have written many proposals and most of these find their way to implementation. A major reason for this, I think is the evidence that underpins the proposals. To me HINARI is like water and oxygen: it is vital for me.”

 

“As the world community looks beyond the Millennium Development Goal milestones in 2015, the Research4Life partnership is setting an example by ensuring sustainability of these important information access initiatives through 2020,” noted Richard Gedye, Director of Outreach Programs, International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers.

 

“The partnership has extended its commitment to the programmes several times since the HINARI programme for Access to Research in Health was launched in 2001. The last two extensions were for 9 and 8 years respectively.  I applaud the long-term commitment by the partnership in support of low- and middle-income country researchers, who have been making such strides in improving scientific practice, policy, and education in the last ten years,” said Kimberly Parker, HINARI Programme Manager at the World Health Organization.

 

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About Reseach4Life
Since 2001, the four programmes, Access to Research in Health (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) and Access to Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI), have grown and developed  to the point where they now give researchers at more than 6,000 institutions in over 100 developing world countries and territories free or low cost online access to some 18,000 peer-reviewed international scientific journals, books, and databases provided by the world’s leading science publishers.

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Notes to Editors:

Case studies about the impact of Research4life on scientists, doctors, nurses and librarians can be found in the 2012, “Making a Difference” booklet. Interviews with the Research4Life partners and program managers are available upon request.

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Physiotherapist Mulugeta Bayisa’s experience with Research4Life’s HINARI programme has helped him find better ways to treat his patients and teach his students

11th July 2012

Physiotherapist Mulugeta Bayisa’s experience with Research4Life’s HINARI programme has helped him find better ways to treat his patients and teach his students. More than that, though, it has changed the way he thinks. Watch this video to find out more.

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Expanding developing-world access – feature in Research Information

9th July 2012

Research4Life, the programme to provide developing-world access to scholarly resources, recently celebrated its tenth birthday. Case studies reveal some of its achievements

Building a viable research culture in developing countries takes more than just access; it calls for training in how to find and use scientific resources, sufficient bandwidth, author workshops and much more.

Read the full article here on ResearchInformation.info

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Technology Partner Microsoft commended for contribution to Research4Life at GBCHealth Business Action on Health Awards

22nd May 2012

GBC HealthGBC HEALTH BUSINESS ACTION ON HEALTH AWARDS

Commended Company 2012: Microsoft Award Category: Partnerships/Collective Action

PROGRAM NAME: RESEARCH4LIFE – A LIBRARY-IN-A-BOX

ABOUT THE COMMENDED PROGRAM

Research4Life is a collaborative initiative involving public and private entities including the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), Cornell University, Yale Univer­sity and more than 160 science publishers led by the International Association of STM Publishers.

Read the Business Action on Health Awards press release in full on GBCHealth.org

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Stories From the Field: How Access to Scientific Literature is Improving the Livelihoods of Communities Around the World

25th January 2012

©FAO/Alessia Pierdomenico

Click here to download the Research4Life Making a Difference Booklet (Low Resolution)

To celebrate Research4Life’s 10th anniversary in 2011, we launched a user experience competition. We asked users to share with us how HINARI, AGORA or OARE has improved their work, life and community. In total we received some 60 entries from countries in all five continents. This impressive array of inspiring testimonies revealed a wealth of positive impacts brought about by Research4Life. This book celebrates the stories behind some of these competition entries.

This illuminating series of case studies provides insights into how access to the results of peer-reviewed research from Research4Life publisher partners is benefiting the health, well-being, and economic and social development of communities in the developing world, as well as contributing to greater environmental health and awareness.

As you read through the following pages, you will discover how access to HINARI, AGORA and OARE has:

• allowed a doctor in Ethiopia to successfully treat a patient with a rare and serious condition, and helped his hospital to deliver more effective training to orthopaedic physicians;

• enabled local researchers, scholars and scientists at a Malawi agricultural college to produce quality and well-researched project reports, scientific papers, theses and dissertations;

• enabled a Nepalese paediatrician to save children’s lives through better treatment of diarrhoeal diseases, at the same time as developing his hospital’s journal into a scientifically rigorous publication;

• helped a physician to improve the lives of HIV-infected children in Zambia;

• allowed a Nigerian researcher to complete his PhD and other research on organic agriculture, biopesticides and biofertilizers, while facilitating his acceptance into the global research community in his discipline;

• helped a researcher from Burkina Faso to develop better and more informed scientific writing skills, produce focused research that he can discuss with top researchers worldwide, compete more effectively for research funding, and deliver better teaching programmes;

• allowed a Sudanese policy-maker to introduce evidence-based policy development designed to improve the Sudanese people’s health in the long term;

• enabled a midwife to improve maternity care in Zimbabwe and reduce maternal and neonatal mortality rates.

If reading this book encourages you to become further involved in our programmes, as a contributing publisher, a beneficiary developing-world institution, or as a donor please contact us at info@research4life.org

Richard Gedye
Director of Publishing Outreach Programmes
International Association of Scientific,Technical & Medical Publishers (STM)

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WIPO’s ARDI Programme Joins Research4Life

13th October 2011

For Release: 13 October 2011

For Information, contact: Andrew Czajkowski, Innovation and Technology Support Section World Intellectual Property Organization (contact: ardi@wipo.int)

Geneva, Switzerland – The Research4Life partnership, which enables free or low cost online access in the developing world to vital scientific research, is joined today by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), making its ARDI (Access to Research for Development and Innovation) programme the fourth programme in the partnership.

Launched in 2009, ARDI was developed together with 12 major scientific and technical publishers in close cooperation with the Research4Life programmes, which include WHO’s HINARI (Access to Research in Health), FAO’s AGORA (Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture) and UNEP’s OARE (Online Access to Research in the Environment). With a particular focus on applied science and technology, the ARDI programme seeks to reinforce the capacity of developing countries to participate in the global knowledge economy and to support researchers in developing countries in the innovation process to create and develop new solutions to technical challenges faced on a local and global level.
Kimberly Parker, Chair of the Research4Life Executive Council and HINARI Programme Manager says: “Researchers in low-income countries will now have access to the source materials that will help fuel their own technological breakthroughs. We’re delighted that ARDI is now the fourth pillar of Research4Life.”

ARDI brings to the Research4Life partnership not only WIPO’s expertise and resources in the area of knowledge infrastructure, including its powerful free PATENTSCOPE patent search service, but also a growing network of Technology and Innovation Support Centers (TISCs) based in universities and research centers around the world, whose trained staff support local users in effectively accessing and exploiting technological knowledge.

According to a statement by Mr. Yo Takagi, WIPO Assistant Director General, “ARDI represents an important contribution by WIPO to the establishment of a solid and accessible global knowledge infrastructure. By joining the R4L partnership, ARDI will be in a position to foster an active exchange of ideas and technologies, the underpinning of sustainable long-term development, on a global scale.”

About Reseach4Life

Research4Life is a public-private partnership between the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell University, Yale University and several technical partners including Microsoft. The partnership’s goal is to contribute to the attainment of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals, reducing the knowledge gap between industrialized countries and developing countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, The Research4Life programmes have provided researchers at more than 5,000 institutions in 105 developing countries with free or low-cost access to over 8,000 leading journals in the fields of health, agriculture, and environment.

About WIPO

WIPO is a specialized agency of the United Nations dedicated to developing a balanced and accessible international intellectual property (IP) system which rewards creativity, stimulates innovation and contributes to economic development while safeguarding the public interest. It has a mandate from its 184 member states to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world through cooperation among states and in collaboration with other stakeholders. WIPO’s activities fall broadly into three areas, namely, the progressive development of international IP law, IP capacity-building programs to support the efficient use of IP, particularly in developing countries, and services to industry which facilitate the process of obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and alternative dispute resolution options for private parties.

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Joint Winners from Nepal and Ethiopia Announced in Research4Life Global Case Study Competition

19th July 2011

For Release: 19 July 2011

For Information, contact: +44 (0)20 81332367

London, United Kingdom – The Research4Life partners today announced two winners in the “Access to Scientific Research Literature” global case study competition on how HINARI, AGORA, and/or OARE have impacted both work and communities. Dr. Arun Neopane a pediatrician from Nepal and Mr. Mulugeta Bayisa, a physiotherapist from Ethiopia were chosen as joint winners from over 60 entries to the competition held in celebration of the 10 year anniversary of the launch of HINARI and the Research4Life programme.

The competition drew entries from more than 30 countries, and represented the broad range of institutions which have access to the HINARI, AGORA and/or OARE programmes. Multimedia and print entries came from researchers, librarians and health professionals who shared their insights on how Research4Life can benefit eligible institutions in developing countries.
Joint winner Dr. Arun Neopane of Nepal offered readers the opportunity to experience not only how Research4Life has benefited his work as a paediatrician, but also how it has supported him in his role as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Nepal Paediatric Society and General Secretary of Nepal Association of Medical Editors (NAME). “HINARI has changed the perspective of research in our country. It has saved so much of the precious time of our doctors, by making them more learned. And it has also saved many lives”, states Dr. Arun Neopane, “Being a co-winner is not only important to me but also for all the medical journal editors of Nepal, the academicians who teach, the researchers, and for the medical professionals in the country as a whole.”

Joint winner Mr. Mulugeta Bayisa is a physiotherapist based at the University of Gondar, College of Medicine and Health Sciences in Ethiopia. He also teaches undergraduate students in both clinical and classroom environments. Using HINARI, he co-developed an innovative therapeutic exercise programme for adults living with HIV and AIDS to improve the health related quality of life, which is now being implemented by the University Hospital. Additionally, Mr. Bayisa has used this access to the scientific literature to develop evidence-based physiotherapy management guidelines for children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, and to develop a programme of effective spinal manipulative therapy for acute low back pain in adults. Mr. Bayisa is testimony to how an initiative such as Research4Life can change people’s lives, “I can stand confident in front of people and tell them that I can make true difference with the help of Research 4Life,” he states.

HINARI Programme Manager Kimberly Parker expressed her gratitude to users around the world for offering their first-hand personal experiences, as well as lessons learned through participating in one of the Research4Life programmes, “Nothing is more powerful than those images and words spoken by those that have benefited directly from the Programme,” she explains, ‘Their testimonies validate the importance of HINARI, as well as AGORA and OARE, and help give us valuable insight into the needs of our users and future development opportunities within the initiative itself.’

Barbara Aronson, who has been involved with Research4Life since HINARI’s inception, served as part of the international jury in the competition, “It has been very touching to read the competition entries. It’s wonderful to see that just about everything we hoped for and imagined in April 2000 is actually happening,” she explains.

Karen Hunter, former Senior Vice President at Elsevier, a key Research4Life partner, also participated in the jury deliberations, “Many of the submissions described conditions in developing countries or examples of individual dedication that were moving and inspirational,” she states, “As one of those involved in the initial discussions that resulted in HINARI, it’s been a privilege to be part of the Research4Life programme.”

Due to the calibre of the entries submitted from around the world, a special feature page will be developed and made available on the Research4Life website to recognize these dedicated professionals and share their experiences.

About Research4Life

Research4Life is the collective name for three public-private partnerships which seek to help achieve the UN’s Millennium Development Goals by providing the developing world with access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the three programmes, Health Access to Research (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) and Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE), have given researchers at more than 5,000 institutions in 105 developing world countries free or low cost access to over 7,000 journals provided by the world’s leading science publishers.

Research4Life is a public-private partnership of the WHO, FAO, UNEP, Cornell and Yale Universities and the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers. Together with technology partner Microsoft, the partnership’s goal is to help attain six of the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals by 2015, reducing the scientific knowledge gap between industrialized countries and the developing world.

For more information visit www.Research4Life.org

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Serials Solutions Provides the Summon™ Service to Support Research4Life

19th July 2011

Complimentary Discovery Service and Volunteer Librarians Will Help Build Research Capacity in World’s Poorest Countries

Seattle – July 19, 2011 – Serials Solutions®, a business unit of ProQuest® LLC, will support the three United Nations-sponsored Research4Life programs via its award-winning Summon™ discovery service.  Research4Life is the collective name given to HINARI, AGORA and OARE, the three programs that offer developing countries free or very low cost online access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content provided by the world’s leading publishers. Beginning with a pilot for HINARI, Serials Solutions will provide complete Summon™ sites for each Research4Life program that enable simple, fast, unified discovery of the entire Research4Life research collections. In addition, professional librarians on staff at Serials Solutions are volunteering time and expertise to create individual Summon™ search sites for eligible countries.

Read the full article on SerialSolutions.com

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Tailoring Workshops to the Participants’ Needs (HINARI, July 2011)

6th July 2011

HINARI logo

  • In the past three years, approximately 20 new training modules have been developed. These include E-book Resources for HINARI Users, Evidence-based Practice Resources for HINARI Users, EndnoteWeb, CINAHL, Information Literacy, Authorship Skills, etc. Many of these modules highlight underutilized HINARI resources. Consequently, there is too much material to cover in a 3 or 4 day workshop.
  • The 1st part of the module reviews E-books resources available from HINARI Partner Publishers via the Reference Sources drop down menu (e.g. The Oxford Textbook of Medicine). The 2nd part is an overview of free E-books available from the Internet (e.g. freebooks4doctors com gateway). After completing this module, participants will have the knowledge and skills to locate and use these clinical and basic sciences electronic textbooks.
  • In recent workshops in Papua New Guinea and Nepal, the trainers have worked with the local organizers to identify the specific information needs of the participants. For Nepal, an ‘Advanced HINARI’ course was developed. In Papua New Guinea, the workshop included the E-book Resources, Evidence-based Practice Resources plus a separate Authorship Skills course. (February 2011).

Read the article on WHO.int here

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Research4Life in Ethiopia – User Shares His Experiences

1st July 2011

Physiotherapist Mulugeta Bayisa’s experience with Research4Life’s HINARI programme has helped him find better ways to
treat his patients and teach his students. More than that, though, it has changed the way he thinks. July 2011

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Young innovators seek solutions to close the ‘knowledge gap’

6th February 2011

Reducing the scientific knowledge gap between industrialized countries and the developing world is one of the eight UN Millennium Development Goals which nations seek to attain by 2015.

Research4Life, a public-private partnership between UN entities, publishers and research institutes, helps the poorest countries bridge the knowledge gap by providing online access to valuable scientific journals and research materials.

Read the full article on UNEP.org

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Over 700 Elsevier Science & Technology Books Now Available in Research4Life

30th January 2011

Elsevier is contributing an additional 950 electronic books to Research4Life, a public-private partnership working to achieve the UN’s Millennium Development Goals by providing developing world access to critical scientific research. Building on the 800 existing Elsevier science and technology books, the new electronic books cover Clinical Medicine (438 titles), Health Professions (332 titles), Veterinary Medicine (174 titles), and Clinical Dentistry (24 titles). These include seminal works such as Clinical Gynecology, Cancer Pain, Pain Medicine, Spinal Cord Injuries, and Saunders Manual of Small Animal Practice and will be accessible to users by the end of the year.

Read the full article on Elsevier.com

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Wiley-Blackwell Announces 102 Additional Products Available through Research4Life

6th January 2011

WileyHoboken, NJ, January 6, 2011—Wiley-Blackwell, the scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE:JWa and JWb), announced today that an additional 88 journals and 24 non-journal resources will be available through the three United Nations sponsored Research4Life programs that provide developing countries with free or low cost access to and training for academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.

The Research4Life programs—HINARI, AGORA, and OARE—constitute a public-private partnership between WHO, FAO, UNEP, Cornell and Yale Universities, more than 130 science publishers led by the International Association of STM Publishers, and technology partner Microsoft. The partnership’s goal is to contribute to the attainment of six of the UN’s eight Millennium Development Goals by reducing the gap in scientific knowledge between industrialized countries and the developing world.

Read the full release on eu.wiley.com

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Research4Life software development challenge presented to thousands of students in Microsoft’s Imagine Cup

22nd November 2010

REDMOND, Wash. — Nov. 22, 2010 — Microsoft Corp. today announced Imagine Cup Solve This, a new program to provide inspiration for students looking to help solve the world’s toughest problems. In the spirit of “crowdsourcing,” intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and nonprofits now will be able to seek the help of the brilliant and passionate students competing in Microsoft’s Imagine Cup, the world’s premier student technology competition, to develop innovative solutions to real-world problems. Global IGOs and NGOs including NetHope, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the United Nations Programme on Youth, the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP), the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and local New York City nonprofit the Robin Hood Foundation are among the first organizations to participate.

Read the full article on Microsoft.com

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How Providing Access to Research Helps Address the UN Millennium Development Goals – Microsoft’s Frank McCosker

28th September 2010

Posted by Frank McCosker
Managing Director, Global Strategic Accounts

At Microsoft, we are driven by the idea that technology helps enable people to realize their full potential. Our involvement with Research4Life is a great example of how access to technology and the information it can provide helps others do great things. Research4Life is a global partnership formed from a shared vision of providing the developing world with access to leading scientific research information that can help them address the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

This month, representatives from Microsoft, along with several UN organizations, the world’s leading scientific journal publishers, research universities and others met in New York City for the annual partners meeting to discuss the past, present and future of this multi-sector initiative. The passion and commitment of this group, who often volunteer their time and talents on top of their day jobs, was evident throughout the meeting, which was well timed as world leaders met at the Millennium Development Goals Summit during the UN General Assembly.

Read the full article by Frank McCosker on Technet

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STM Appoints Richard Gedye Director of Outreach Programmes

1st September 2010

Oxford, 1 September 2010

From 1 January 2011, STM is pleased to announce that Richard Gedye, currently Research Director at Oxford University Press, will assume responsibility for STM’s Outreach Programmes upon his retirement from OUP. These programmes include Research4Life and patientINFORM access initiatives, the ARDI patent project and STM’s activities with library organisations.

For the last ten years Research4Life and its separate HINARI, AGORA, and OARE programmes, together with patientINFORM and ARDI have been expertly developed and run by Maurice Long, who will be retiring from STM at the end of 2010.

Read the whole release via PDF here

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Researchers and Farmers in Burkina Faso Benefit from Research4Life’s AGORA Programme

1st September 2010

As one of the poorest countries in the world, Burkina Faso regularly suffers from drought, poor soil, lack of adequate communications and other infrastructure, a low literacy rate, and a stagnant economy. With 80% of the population relying on the agricultural sector, improving the productivity and competitiveness of Burkina Faso’s agricultural sector is a critical issue for the country’s future. Local researchers know that progress can made in tackling these issues in part through innovation and the application of new technologies, many of which are available in the wealth of information and knowledge developed by the world’s agricultural science community.

A new video launched today illustrates how INERA (Institut de l’Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles), Burkina Faso’s leading institute for agricultural and environmental research, is using the Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) programme to access online scientific journals with information on fertilizers and dosages to support development of techniques for maximizing production. Using cutting-edge research through AGORA, a new micro dose fertilization technology, adapted to local needs, was developed jointly by farmers and INERA’s researchers.

 

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ILIG International Award Honours Vimbai Hungwe

30th August 2010

This annual prize is awarded to a person, group or committee, which has made a real difference to a community through their work in library and information services in countries outside the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

This year, two recipients for 2010 were announced at the ILIG informal held at CILIP HQ on Wednesday 7th July.

Vimbai Hungwe was the President of AHILA, the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa, and Senior Programme Officer at ITOCA, the Information Technology Outreach Centre for Africa.

Read a PDF of the press release online here

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Low-Income Countries Get Free Access to Medical Text(regarding Oxford Textbook of Medicine Joining HINARI)- From Wellcome Trust Blog (May 2010)

17th May 2010

A new Wellcome Trust sponsorship is helping doctors and healthcare workers in low- and middle-income countries gain free access to one of the world’s leading medical texts.

The Oxford Textbook of Medicine has provided practical guidance on clinical management and the prevention of disease for over 35 years. It contains the best in international medicine from 750 of the world’s best clinicians and medical scientists, covering basic science, clinical practice, infectious diseases and unique sections on the foundations, achievements and limitations of modern medicine, and global patterns of disease.

Read the full article on Wellcome Trust

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A medicine classic goes online and far afield: OUP’s Oxford Textbook of Medicine launched online for the first time (From Oxford University Press, May 2010)

6th May 2010

Oxford University Press logoOxford University Press (OUP) has launched, for the first time online, the prestigious Oxford Textbook of Medicine. Generations of consultants, trainees, and medical students have relied on this “classic” for practical guidance on clinical management and the prevention of disease. Others, such as journalists, authors, and lawyers have used it as the ultimate reference medical book.

In print, this fifth edition of Oxford Textbook of Medicine is a three-volume heavyweight with just under 6,000 pages. It has taken around five years, and 750 of the world’s foremost clinicians and medical scientists, to put it together. One of the biggest benefits of moving online will be the ability to update content regularly, based on clinical evidence, so physicians can be confident they’re looking at the latest information.

Read the full article on OUP.com

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