Archive for the ‘News’ Category

2016 MLA Hinari/Research4Life Grant Recipients

14th September 2016

The Medical Library Association (MLA)mla and the Elsevier Foundation have announced the recipients of the 2016 MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grants.

hinlogo-05Funded by the Elsevier Foundation, these grants will support HINARI/R4L training activities that promote the use of the programs’ scientific research resources in emerging/low income countries. The recipients will use the grants to benefit individuals to obtain skills to effectively and efficiently use the Hinari/Research4Life resources and also become trainers for their institutions or country.

The recipients will be honored at the Presidents’ Awards Dinner during MLA’17 in Seattle, Washington.

  • Martha Cecilia Garcia, Coordinator National Library of Medicine, Honduras, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras.
  • Karin Saric, Information Services Librarian, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California, USA.
  • Alemayehu Bisrat, Health Informatics Expert and Project Coordinator, Center for eHealth, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.
  • Dativa Tibyampansha, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
  • Megan von Isenburg, Duke University, North Carolina, USA.

Congratulations to the winners!

Ready to Submit an Application for the 2017 Grants?

Choose the 2017 MLA Hinari/Research4Life Grant online application form. The completed online form and supporting documents must be received by December 1.  Be certain to follow the application checklist, as submissions lacking required information will not be reviewed.

For more information visit www.mlanet.org

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

New Hinari Master Trainer Online Course

6th September 2016

We are pleased to announce the new Hinari Master Trainer course.

On the next October 1st, a new 4-week free online Hinari Master Trainer Course will start thanks to the collaboration with our partners Librarians without Borders (Medical Library Association) and the Information Training and Research Centre for Africa (ITOCA).

The course aims to present the recent developments of the Hinari portal and provide training in different topics such as searching for health information and marketing a library. At the end of the course, participants will be able to enhance their knowledge on various information sources in health and develop the capacity to self-organize training activities in their own institutions.

Some of the modules covered include:

  • Using Hinari/PubMed database
  • Using Summon for searching in Hinari
  • Accessing e-books and health information on the Internet
  • Organizing an e-resource workshop
  • Developing a Marketing Plan

In order to participate in the course, applicants must be residing in a Hinari eligible country (please note the course will be offered in English only at this time) and must have attended a past recent Hinari workshop (between 2012 and 2016).

Application form can be found in the following link: goo.gl/forms/r7B1ZbDPnVjBeGDU2

Don’t miss this opportunity to become a Hinari Master Trainer!

Artboard 1

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life is now part of Oxfam’s Digital Searching and Access Guideline

1st September 2016

Screen Shot 2016-09-01 at 2.20.52 PMIn November 2012, Oxfam  -one of the biggest international organizations working to fight poverty-, launched a series of guidelines to help development practitioners conduct high-quality research. The “how-to” guidelines are available in the Oxfam Policy and Practice website, which offers free access to over 4,000 publications. The research guidelines cover different aspects of the research process including the communication of research.

Originally written for Oxfam staff and partners, the guidelines cover important topics such as conducting interviews, planning surveys, creating graphics and other methodologies for best research practices. The guidelines have become very popular and are cited by academic literature and research reports.

Since July 2016, one of the guidelines, Reviewing the existing literature now reflects the work of Research4Life and INASP -one of Research4Life’s partners- in making books, journals, and databases more widely accessible to researchers in the developing world. We’re looking forward to keep working more with Oxfam in the production of research guidelines.

All guidelines are in English with some available in French and Spanish.

For more information visit the Oxfam Policy and Practice website or check the full list of Oxfam’s Research Guidelines.

 

 

 

 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life General Partners Meeting 2016

11th August 2016
cp6yjmeweaetvmp

2016 Research4Life General Partners Meeting delegates

The Research4Life Annual General Partners Meeting was held at Cornell University’s Weill Cornell Medical College on  20 and 21 July 2016 in New York City. The meeting brought together more than 30 delegates and observers representing our publishing community, the United Nations agencies, University libraries, the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers and two representatives from the user community.

The overall purpose of the meeting was to review the work of Research4Life and its programmes during the past year as well as discuss the emerging strategic issues, outlined in the new strategy document “Beyond 2020” which describes the priorities for the next five years and beyond .

The General Partners Partners Meeting was an invaluable space for communication, providing a showcase for the pioneering work of Research4Life and its programmes —in partnership with hundreds of publishers—in providing access to scientific information in the developing world and an opportunity to learn from our colleagues, whose feedback guides our strategic vision.

The next Research4Life General Partners Meeting will be held in Oxford in July 2017.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4life/INASP Advocacy competition on Elsevier Connect

4th July 2016

Grace-Ajuwon2To highlight the critical role that doctors, researchers, librarians and policymakers play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries, Research4Life joined with INASP to launch an advocacy competition. The aim of the contest is to find case studies that show how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

A good example of advocacy leadership is the story of Grace Ajuwon, one of the first librarians to be trained to use Hinari, Research4Life’s flagship biomedical database. Over a decade ago, Grace, a senior librarian at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, used that training to jumpstart her own research into health information. A year later, in 2003, she published a peer-reviewed paper in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, concluding that clinical and nursing students were neglecting electronic resources. Grace successfully advocated for the inclusion of computer education in medical and nursing curricula, ensuring that computer laboratories were installed and went on train thousands of medical and research staff across her own and other African institutions in effectively using scientific resource.

Read more on Elsevier Connect

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Forum on Open Data, Open Science and Open Access to Agricultural Information, Accra, Ghana

28th June 2016

AGORA_Nigeria_1

The final of three Open Data and Open Science Forums in Africa is set to take place July 11 2016, followed by the last in a series of training workshops, July 12-13


Organized by FAO in conjunction with several partners, this Forum is an opportunity to draw together senior level researchers and officers from a mixture of institutions in Ghana to talk about some of the challenges to open access to agricultural information in Ghana and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

Timely access to agricultural research holds great potential in tackling food insecurity and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to ending poverty and hunger, particularly in SSA where institutional and national challenges mean that research often isn’t visible or accessible.

In Ghana agriculture provides over 90% of the country’s food needs and employs over 50% of the population. But many farmers don’t have access to agricultural information, or to the Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) that provide it. Accelerating progress in agriculture depends to some extent on concerted effort by all stakeholders, and a handful of prerequisites to open data and open science.

As well as better access to ICTs, these include: creating an enabling environment that supports open data and open science in agriculture; scientists and researchers being willing to share knowledge on open platforms, and farmers and rural populations empowered to adopt new technologies and innovations.

Through capacity development and support FAO has long worked alongside the Ghana Agricultural Information Network (GAINS) to enhance access to agricultural information in Ghana. FAO and GAINS proposed the Forum as part of FAO’s relationship with GAINS and its member institutions, as well as its current work with several partners, including Research4Life, Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) and Open Agriculture Knowledge for Development (CIARD).  

 The event is targeted at senior level officers, with around 60 participants attending from a mixture of agriculture-related institutions – government ministries, academia, private sector organizations, farmer organizations and NGOs from Ghana and the sub region.  Around 50 participants – researchers, lecturers, post‐graduate students in food, agriculture and rural development, and selected library and information professionals will attend the two-day training workshop that follows the forum.

Approach

The chief aim of the forum is to act as a dialogue platform for stakeholders to share knowledge on institutional and national initiatives in Ghana aimed at enhancing the visibility, access and use of agricultural data and science.Taking place over half a day the Forum will be split into two 45-minute expert and senior policy panel sessions with follow-up Q&As in Plenary .

Part II of the Ghana Forum (12-13 July 2016) is a two-day training workshop with a core focus on accessing online, peer-reviewed literature through the Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) and the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology (AGRIS). The workshops also provides an overview of intellectual property and copyright challenges, and existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

Specific objectives

  • Raise awareness of the main global trends in scientific publishing in agriculture focusing on open data and open science strategies
  • Share knowledge and discuss national trends on enhancing access to agriculture data and science;
  • Discuss strategies to advocate for open data and open science in agriculture
  • Discuss potential mechanisms for enhanced knowledge sharing initiatives in agriculture in SSA.
  • Enhance capacities of researchers, lecturers and post‐graduate students in agriculture and rural development on accessing online, peer‐reviewed literature in agriculture and related sciences through AGORA and AGRIS.

Expected outcomes

A common understanding of:

  • The role and potential contributions of open data, open science and open access to food and nutrition security
  • Current trends in open data and open science and the challenges that Ghana faces
  • Institutional and national policy implications and strategies for open data and open science
  • Enhanced mechanisms for sharing knowledge on open data and open science initiatives, technologies and standards
  • Enhanced skills to access and use online resources on AGRIS and AGORA.

Organizers


logos_forum_Ghana

The following organizations are working together to organize the forum:

  • Institute for Scientific and Technological Information (INSTI) of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)
  • Association of African Universities (AAU)
  • Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA)
  • College of Basic and Applied Sciences (CBAS) of the University of Ghana (UG)
  • Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
  • Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN)
  • Research4Life
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

INASP and Research4Life Launch Research Advocacy Competition

28th June 2016

Global case study competition spotlights how users in the developing world have successfully advocated for a sustainable research culture.

London, United Kingdom June 28, 2016INASP and Research4Life have announced today a competition to recognize the critical role that researchers, librarians, policymakers, doctors and other professionals play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries. The competition calls for case studies demonstrating how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

Over the last two decades, INASP and Research4Life have worked to close the information gap between developed and developing countries by providing free or low cost access to academic, scientific, and professional peer-reviewed content online and providing the necessary training to support researchers, practitioners, librarians and authors in building viable research ecosystems. The competition will run from June 28th to September 15th and highlight best practice in garnering support from leaders to improve the sustainability of this access and usage. Case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international partners from the INASP and Research4Life communities.

Julie Brittain, Executive Director of INASP says: “Since 2002, INASP has been working with libraries, library consortia and publishers to supply relevant and appropriate online literature to academics and researchers in all fields. Top level support from institutional leaders has enabled librarians to provide access to much needed content and to build awareness and use among academics, researchers and students. We are keen for all those involved to share stories of how they have gathered support from decision makers and budget holders, as this is the key to on-going, long term access to research literature.”

“Since 2001, Research4Life has been working to provide access to critical research in the developing world. Our reach has grown to 117 countries and 69,000 journals, books and databases, but we realize more than ever that it can only be truly sustainable if leaders “upstream” of practitioners, researchers, and librarians are equally supportive of this need,” said Richard Gedye, Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and Director of Outreach Programmes at the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, “Our competition aims to celebrate and share those advocacy successes.”

The INASP/Research4Life Advocacy Competition is open to all researchers, practitioners, librarians and policymakers whose institution is a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes  Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI or has access to research through an agreement mediated by INASP. Submissions will be accepted through http://www.research4life.org/research4life-inasp-advocacy-competition. The winner be announced in November and invited to present their work at the annual Publishers for Development conference and Research4Life General Partners Meeting in the UK in July 2017. Three contributing Research4Life partners have pledged prizes: Elsevier will provide the winner with a travel grant to cover their attendance at these meetings, SAGE Publishing has offered a one year subscription to a major reference work and Taylor & Francis will provide an honourable mention award.

###

About INASP
INASP (www.inasp.info) is an international development charity working with a global network of partners to improve access, production and use of research information and knowledge, so that countries are equipped to solve their development challenges.

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to nearly 70,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Communications Coordinator
Research4Life
communications@research4life.org
@r4lpartnership

Alex Kealey,
Communications Officer
INASP
akealey@inasp.info
@INASPinfo

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

A total of 69,000 online resources now available in Research4Life

26th May 2016

The total online resources available in Research4Life is going up

We are pleased to announce a new update in the number of online resources available through the Research4Life programes. In the last 18 months, the total count of material has risen up to 69,000, an increase of 42% from the latest count of 48,000.

The new number of resources includes new titles added to books, journals and other information material in the collections of the four Research4Life programmes –Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI-.

R4L_numbers_2016_all-02

Each of the Research4Life programs have updated number of resources with major additions in the AGORA collection. 15,000 new e-books related to chemistry, economics, geography and geology were added to AGORA now bringing the total number of books to up to 22,000.

You can access this range of resources by logging into your specific program using your institution’s credentials. If you are not registered yet find out if your institution is eligible and register now.

Hinari online resources
AGORA online resources
OARE online resources
ARDI online resources
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Total resources on AGORA swells to 28,000

24th May 2016

AGORA_screenshot

Huge new input onto the platform gives researchers access to 15,000 new books


New resources are being added to Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) all the time but this latest addition represents an enormous boost to the online collection, with 15,000 new e-books now bringing the total number of books to 22,000.

The primary publishers of the new books are Elsevier, John Wiley & Sons, and Oxford University Press Books, and the titles – 479 of them newly published – are primarily related to chemistry, economics, geography and geology.

In addition, the number of journals on AGORA now nudges 6,000 taking the total number of combined resources on the platform to just under 28,000.

You can access this range of resources by logging into AGORA using your institution’s credentials. (If you’re not registered but would like to find out more, click here).

Looking forward AGORA’s collection of research resources is likely to continue to grow at an impressive rate. Access the full range of content through AGORA’s Summon search engine.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Tanzania workshop on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), May 24-25 2016

23rd May 2016

TansaniaThe Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO of the UN) in conjunction with several partners is organizing a series of training workshops across Asia and Africa focused on access to research in agriculture and fisheries. Last month workshops were held in Namibia and Myanmar. Now a similar workshop is set to take place at Tanzania’s Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) May 24-25 2016.


Tanzania_BlogTailored to researchers the workshops are aimed at drawing attention to the scope of free online agricultural information available on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) and AGRIS (International System for Agricultural Science and Technology) and in effectively using these resources.

Alongside this core focus, the workshops raise awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, with a look at the further range of resources available to researchers in agricultural research.

Background

Being able to access timely agricultural information and understanding how to get the best out of research is a key issue, particularly in Tanzania. It is the fastest growing economy in the East African community and over the past decade has made stellar progress in sustaining economic growth, with the amount of people living in “basic needs poverty” falling 34.4% in 2006, to 28.2% by 2012, according to a World Bank poverty assessment.

However, this relative domestic stability hasn’t translated into economic growth for many Tanzanians. The country remains one of the poorest countries in Sub Saharan Africa, with up 12 million people living in poverty, 10 million of them in rural areas. A 2014 UN Tanzania Human Development (THD) Report suggests that economic growth alone is not enough to make a difference.

Agriculture is seen as one of the country’s top priorities in reducing poverty. The sector employs around three quarters of Tanzania’s workforce and accounts for around a quarter of the country’s GDP. Separately, a FAO report describes fisheries as a huge source of untapped potential.

Meanwhile, Arica’s research output is booming – ResearchTrends reported that African authors nearly doubled their research share over the past decade. More research than ever is available. But mentoring researchers in Tanzania to locate and use agricultural information and raising awareness of free and low cost platforms like AGORA and AGRIS has the potential to make a big impact on agricultural productivity.

Workshop: approach

While there are a huge amount of research resources on AGORA and AGRIS, making effective searches on both platforms requires know-how, and the idea is for the workshop to train researchers to get the best out of the two programs so that they can share this knowledge back in their institutions.

The workshops provide an overview of both databases, with guidance on searching through the range of free and low-cost research materials and training on some of the new trends and challenges in open science, open access and open data in agriculture. As well as an overview of intellectual and copyright a further section of the workshop looks at existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

Day two of the workshop features a special panel session, which is yet to be confirmed.

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI, AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provides low-income countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.

The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research.

Set up by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO of the UN) together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides low-income countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, with a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in low-income countries. Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network and alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge.

Organizers

FAO is organizing the workshop in conjunction with GODANITOCA, COSTECH, AIMS, AGORA and Research4Life

Sources

New-Ag (New Agriculturalist)

AllAfrica.com

UN Human Development Report 2015

WorldBank

Fao Fisheries and Aquaculture Dept

WorldBank.org

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Namibia hosts Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Africa in the context of Sustainable Development Goals, 18 April 2016

12th April 2016

Namibia_WS

The second of four forums organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and partners, the forum is targeted at experts from senior government, academia and NGOs.


Strengthening access to agricultural science and technical information (Open Data and Open Science*) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is vital if Africa is to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to ending hunger, alleviating poverty, gender equality, climate change and health.

Due to challenges at both an institutional and national level much agriculture-related data produced in SSA isn’t visible or accessible, hindering any meaningful impact on food security in the region. A UN report found that in 2015 more than 40% of the population of SSA was still living in poverty and that the region faces daunting challenges with regards rapid population growth, high levels of poverty and conflicts.  Data has become a key asset for agricultural transformation in Africa. Indeed greater access to and sharing of agricultural data and science are two of the keys to unlocking change, allowing innovative solutions to be developed to address food insecurity and poverty on the continent.

However, in order for Open Data and Open Science initiatives to make any meaningful impact on SDGs and on the lives of Africans, most of whom make a living in the rural domain, they must draw together and galvanize players from the full agricultural spectrum.

An enabling environment where agricultural researchers and experts can share their innovations on open platforms is imperative. Farmers, rural populations and development specialists must also be empowered to adopt new innovative technologies and solutions aimed at combatting hunger and poverty in the region.

Sustainable Development Goals

As the eight Millennium Development Goals of the last 15 years came to a conclusion in 2015, a new set of transformative Sustainable Development Goals took their place. While the MDGs made huge strides on a global scale towards eradicating extreme poverty and inequality, development in SSA has been patchy and the challenge is now on to transform the demands of the new SDGs into action. 

Formally signed by the UN in September 2015 The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda included 17 new goals and 169 targets with individual governments expected to create national frameworks for achieving them.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon described the new SDGs as a “shared vision of humanity, and a to-do list for people and planet and a blueprint for success”.

The new SDGs go a step further than the MDGs, addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development. They place increased emphasis on the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection. With the spotlight increasingly on sustainability, Open Data and Open Science initiatives in agriculture in Africa come into even sharper focus. 


Namibia totemGoal of the forums

The chief objective of the forums is to provide a dialogue platform where senior agricultural experts in SSA can articulate some of the challenges to Open Data and Open Science and propose possible strategies.

The forum in Namibia, where around half the population depends largely on subsistence agriculture for a living and the national level of income inequality is one of the highest in the world, asks how enhancing access to Open Data and Science in agriculture can enable the country and indeed, SSA to fulfill SDGs.  

Senior experts in agriculture will:

  • exchange knowledge on institutional and national initiatives aimed at enhancing access to agricultural data science
  • share knowledge and discuss national global trends on data and science access
  • discuss potential mechanisms for enhanced knowledge sharing initiatives in agriculture in SSA.

Expected outcomes

  • A common understanding the role of open data and open science in achieving Africa’s SDGs. 
  • Clarification of the institutional, national and regional policy implications for open data and open science
  • Agreement on the mechanisms, technologies and standards for sharing open data and open science initiatives

Approach

Spearheaded by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO of the UN), the collective forums in Kenya (June 2015), Namibia (April 2016), Ghana (July 2016) and Tanzania (May 2016) gather together senior specialists from policy, research information and technology in agriculture and related fields. 

In Namibia two senior policy panel discussions will be followed by facilitated discussions in plenary. Panelists include high profile experts in agricultural and rural development, science, technology and library and information management from Namibia and the sub region.

Part II of the Namibia forum (19-20 April 2016) is a two-day workshop on access to scientific information in agriculture. Transforming the overarching theme of the forum into practical training sessions, the workshop is targeted at agriculture information workers with the core focus on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA)

The first forum in Kenya

44 participants gathered in Nairobi in June 2015 (see photo above) where they agreed that Open Science and Open Data requires an enabling environment framework, including appropriate policies and strategies on a governmental and institutional level. Furthermore, researchers and scientists required a more rewarding system that supports open publishing and collaborative research work, especially with regard to young scientists.

One of the key issues is a lack of understanding of the mechanics of Open Data and Open Science with unclear intellectual property rights policies leading to an “over protection” of data.

However, the forum highlighted several Kenyan initiatives already in place to support open science and to foster processes to improved access to agricultural data. Advocacy on an institutional and governmental level was a key recommendation and the Kenya Agricultural Information Network (KAINet) secretariat and member institutions are focused on driving this forward.

Scheduled follow-ups to the forum will be aimed at consolidating permanent dialogue between stakeholders.

Take a look at the full report

Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Nambia

The forum takes place on 18th April at the Avani Hotel in Windhoek, Namibia – speakers to be confirmed.  It is co-organized by FAO alongside the National University of Namibia (UNAM), GODAN, Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA), and Research4Life.

Since 1975 FAO has supported initiatives aimed at opening up access to agricultural data. It is currently working closely alongside several partners, including the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN), Open Agriculture Knowledge for Development (CIARD), and Research4Life to improve access to available agriculture and nutrition data, with a view to contributing to enhance food security in Africa.  All four forums are part of this initiative.

Forum dates:

Namibia: 18 – 20 April 2016
Tanzania: 23 – 25 May 2016
Ghana: 11 – 13 July 2016


*Open data is the idea that certain data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.

Open science is the umbrella term of the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge.”

Source: Wikipedia 

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Myanmar Universities Hosting Training Workshop on Access To Global Online Research in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 25-29 April 2016

12th April 2016

Yangon_University

FAO of the United Nations in conjunction with WorldFish and Research4Life is organizing two workshops at the University of Yangon and Yezin University in Myanmar this month. The workshops are aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, as well as providing access to information and research in these fields.


2015 marked a shift in scientific publishing. While the research community still has to compete for funding there is fresh emphasis on research data sets being “intelligently open” (otherwise known as Open Data*) so that others can use them. Since the adoption of the new 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda the question of Open Data and Open Science* – and in particular ways of accessing and managing those information sources, is at the forefront of the debate.

With the goal of drawing together experts from research organizations in Myanmar, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, WorldFish and Research4Life are organizing a series of workshops aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry. These workshops will look at ways that free access to information and research on agriculture, forestry and fisheries is provided, as well as supporting researchers in data management and publication. 

Myanmar: background

Myanmar_LakeFisheries play a crucial role as a source of livelihood for millions of people in Myanmar with fish being one of the most important food groups. Forestry regeneration in the country has the power to enhance the livelihood benefits of the population both through livelihood oriented forest management and marketing development.  

Although Myanmar is the largest country in South East Asia it also one of the poorest, with poverty disproportionately concentrated in rural areas where the majority of the population lives. Compounding this, visibility and access to information about poverty in Myanmar is lacking, making it hard to identify key restraints to the future development of aquaculture and forestry management, especially their role in alleviating poverty.  Emerging threats from population growth, conflict and climate change, particularly natural disasters, exacerbate the challenge.

According to a national survey on social protection and poverty reduction presented by the FAO in conjunction with Myanmar’s Department of Rural Development, priority in Myanmar should be given to vulnerable fishing communities for poverty reduction and rural development, particularly to increase access to appropriate and effective social assistance.

In the context of these overlapping demands there is a need for well-designed programs and projects that draw attention to the range of free agricultural information resources available to researchers. Strengthening access to agricultural, forestry and fisheries-related data, and indeed training people to use these research tools in Myanmar, has enormous potential to make a difference to people’s lives, as well as for the country to fulfill wider Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   

Myanmar totem

Workshops: approach

The main focus of the workshops is to introduce two databases: AGORA and the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology (AGRIS) – two research tools that give researchers in low-income countries access to a wealth of scientific research and information on agriculture.

The workshops will provide an overview of the overarching structure of the two databases, giving guidance on how best to search through the range of research materials.

A further section focuses on existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

In addition, day two of the Yangon University workshop features a special panel session on “Access to Scientific Information in Myanmar” with presentations from two speakers.

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Set up by FAO of the UN together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides developing countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, providing a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 low-income countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in developing countries.  Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network. Alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge. 

 The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI, AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provide developing countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online

ORGANIZERS

The organizers of these events are WorldFish, Research4Life, FAO of the United Nations, GODAN, University of Yangon and University of Yenzin.


Sources:
Elsevier
Asian Development Blog
World Food Programme
WorldFish

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Grants now open to train LIS professionals and users in developing countries on how to use Research4Life

11th April 2016

MLA_grantDuring the past decade, I have had the privilege of conducting 60-plus workshops in 35 countries to teach individuals in developing countries how to access Research4Life resources. As the key advocate behind Librarians without Borders® (LWB), I have had wonderful experiences working with information professionals, lecturers, physicians, researchers and students from universities, research centers, ministries of health and non-governmental organizations.

Since 2007, I have been the coordinator of the LWB E-library Training Initiative sponsored by the Medical Library Association (MLA) and funded by the Elsevier Foundation. In December, MLA announced the expansion of this initiative, including the new MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grant that focuses on training activities for the Research4Life programs. This expansion reflects a decade-long commitment of Elsevier and the Elsevier Foundation to fund MLA/LWB for a cumulative commitment of US $409,000 to provide essential training to boost Research4Life usage in developing countries.

Read more

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Communication channel: AGORA now has an active discussion forum on DGroups!

31st March 2016

The new group on the e-mail based dialogue platform is a place to stay informed about AGORA and to network 


agora-01At its heart DGroups is a dialogue platform that connects a partnership of groups working in international development. Designed to be as simple and inclusive as possible DGroups uses e-mail as a mode of communication rather than web forums, facilitating users in countries in the south with low bandwidth.

Once signed up to the AGORA DGroup mailing list (it takes less than a minute) members can expect to receive e-mail updates with recent blog posts and news covering anything from capacity development activities to new content. There’ll also be plenty of AGORA-related discussions to join in with.

As one of four initiatives under the Research4Life umbrella AGORA’s mission is to open up access to online research in agriculture in developing countries, and DGroups represents a vital link in this chain.

We look to forward to seeing you on there soon!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grant

10th March 2016

znptcptkThe Medical Library Association (MLA) has announced the HINARI/Research4Life (R4L) Grant for 2016. Funded by the Elsevier Foundation, up to five awards, will support HINARI/R4L training activities that promote the use of the programs’ scientific research resources in emerging/low income countries.  The grants will benefit the users in the eligible countries as these individuals will obtain skills to effectively and efficiently use the HINARI/R4L resources and also become a training resource for their institutions or country.

Who can apply?

  • Applicants are required to hold a professional library or information science qualification, but in the case of exceptional candidates this criterion may be waived. Transcripts or a copy of the diploma should be sent with all applications.
  • Applicants must be currently employed in a health and/or sciences library or related science information organization.
  • Individuals and/or institutions are eligible to submit proposals.
  • Applicants are not required to be members of MLA.

Terms

  • The grant award is contingent upon completion of the project within 18 months of notification of the award.
  • Agreement to submit an interim (9 month) and final reports to MLA’s Librarians Without Borders® The final report that focuses on the results of the project will be posted on the LWB Blog and may be published in other health/science-related information venues or journals.
  • The completed application form and additional documentation must be received by June 13, 2016.
  • More than one grant may be offered in a year. Grants range from $1500 to $6000 and are distributed in one payment.
  • Grant funds are distributed in June following the MLA annual meeting with the project completion date being December 31 of the following year.
  • If there are no appropriate applications, as reviewed by the jury, the association may elect not to fund a grant or multiple grants in a given year.
  • MLA will acknowledge applications upon receipt via email.

Ready to Submit an Application?

All supporting documents and application forms must be completed by June 13, 2016. Incomplete and late submissions will not be considered.
For more information visit the MLA grant site or contact MLA’s grants coordinator with questions.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life Partners Newsletter November 2015

3rd December 2015

Table of Contents


Note from the Editor

 

Dear Partners,

With the launch of the UN Sustainable Development Goals in September, the Research4Life partnership is more determined than ever to bridge the digital divide with our free and low cost access programmes. Our twice-yearly newsletter is designed to bring you up to speed with everything (or almost everything) going on in Research4Life. It is in fact such a dynamic partnership, that it’s hard to capture all that we’re doing. This is a testimony to the incredibly dedicated champions across the partnership from the UN organizations to Yale, Cornell and so many of our publishers.  As you’ll see from our news, we’re exploring new programme ideas around the rule of law, additional UN funding possibilities, and much more. Take a moment to browse and share the latest case studies, milestones and social media campaigns. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and ‘like’ us on Facebook.  Want to get more involved? We have teams focused on everything from communications to training, fundraising, technology and impact. Contact us at info@research4life.org.

Ylann Schemm, Chair of the Research4Life Communications Team and Elsevier Foundation Programme Director

 



Research4Life Annual General Partners Meeting

gpm

Research4Life General Partners Meeting – Geneva, July 2015

The 2015 Research4Life General Partners’ Meeting (GPM) was held in Geneva, at the World Health Organization in July.  60 partners from around the world gathered for a very full agenda, including updates from each programme co-ordinator and the chairs of Research4Life’s teams and working groups. The annual GPM offers a welcome opportunity for members of our very dispersed partnership to meet in a collegial and collaborative setting. We finished our day feeling well briefed on developments over the past year and with some interesting new projects to look forward to.

A particular highlight  was the presentation of the two latest external reviews of Research4Life’s performance and effectiveness – the User Experience Review and the Review of Research4Life’s operational effectiveness and infrastructure. The discussions, and particularly the input from our two user representatives from Uganda and Vietnam, provided us with a useful opportunity to understand how the programmes are actually performing and to brainstorm on their future direction. These discussions were pursued in more depth at the Research4Life Strategic Retreat in Boston on 1-2 October. A team of volunteers is now working to draft a five year strategic plan to be presented at the 2016 GPM.

In addition, GPM delegates approved several important proposals:
Group B Research4Life eligibility was extended to the UK Overseas Dependency of St Helena, Libya and Argentina.  Group A eligibility was also extended to UNHCR-designated “Planned/managed refugee camps”.
Updates were also given on three potential initiatives:

  • GOALI.  A new Research4Life programme covering the Rule of law,
  • DARTT.  A programme for collaboration between Research4Life  and the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS),
  • Friends of Research4Life.  A proposal to found an fundraising organization.

 



Research4Life in the News

 



Training Workshops Highlights

Map_trainings_2015_general-01

Our latest Research4LIfe infographic, created by Natalia Rodriguez, offers an overview of the national training workshops conducted by the Research4Life programmes over the past year. Click here to read more and enlarge the infographic.

  • TReND in Africa Course on Science Communication and Writing:
    In September TReND in Africa organized a week-long course on Science Communication and Writing at Chancellor College in Malawi. Sixteen young researchers from six African countries learned theory and skills to reach out to the broadest possible audience. During the week, young scientists participated in lots of activities ranging from getting the research they need through Research4Life, to writing abstracts, designing posters and posting engaging articles on the course blog. The course was funded by the Elsevier Foundation with contributions from Sunbird Malawi, and crowdfunding via Indiegogo and Mendeley.
  • Workshops in Hanoi, Vietnam
    On September 28 and 29, Lenny Rhine gave additional workshops in Hanoi, Vietnam. The initial workshop reached a 100 students and offered a one day training at the Bach Mai Hospital, a huge tertiary care institution for MA nursing students and clinical cardiology staff. The training covered: Boolean search terms, Google vs. Scholar vs PubMed, HINARI and PubMed searching,  Evidence-based Medicine resources and How to Read a Scientific Paper. A second half-day workshop was given at the Hanoi University of Medicine. This briefer workshop focused on information needs for researchers particularly those working in parasitology and related subjects.

 



Kimberly Parker Wins MLA Lifetime Recognition Award

new_contentKimberly Parker, our HINARI Programme Manager, was presented with the T. Mark Hodges International Service Award in recognition of her outstanding work on behalf of the partnership at the World Health Organization. This award was established in 2007 to honour outstanding individual achievements in promoting, enabling, and delivering improvements in the quality of health information internationally through the development of health information professionals, the improvement of libraries, or an increased use of health information services.

 

 



Mendeley Blog 

b47ea894-2fe1-4e1c-8b2d-3d2894ee2587Mendeley published a blog explaining why they support Research4Life and TReND in Africa’s workshops. It highlights some of TReND’s courses as well. “Mendeley has a vision: to make science more open and to broaden access to scientific content where it can make a real difference to people’s lives.”

 

 

 



Publisher of the Month: Wolters Kluwer & UpToDate®

95dd80d7-bf80-46c4-991e-b8c85f83c357The Research4Life HINARI programme announced a partnership with Wolters Kluwer to provide free access to UpToDate® for the three countries affected by Ebola (Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea). Access is provided for an initial period of at least one year. UpToDate® is the world’s premier online clinical decision support resource from the Health division of Wolters Kluwer. Click here to read more on the partnership.

 


Update: DARTT and Technology Bank for Least Developed Countries UN Initiative

9b7777f9-3401-4e95-abb6-8789e524800eOn 2-4 September, HINARI Programme Manager Kimberly Parker and HINARI founder Barbara Aronson served as expert advisors in Istanbul to the UN High-Level Panel assessing the feasibility of a proposed Technology Bank dedicated to assisting the world’s least developed countries (LDCs) advance out of poverty. Kimberly and Barbara recommended that the Technology Bank incorporate an activity that could become a new Research4Life programme (DARTT) focused on LDCs. The Feasibility Report of the High-Level Panel was delivered to the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon on 22 September, and is currently on the Agenda for the 70th session of the General Assembly.  Assuming continued approval from the UN General Assembly for the initiative, and the pledging of necessary funding, the Technology Bank could begin operations as early as the third or fourth quarter of 2016.

 



Librarians without Borders Receives Elsevier Foundation Grants

7cf87f1b-3082-4a6e-9c09-b558da16a66fThe Elsevier Foundation announced it will support the Medical Library Association(MLA)/Librarians Without Borders®(LWB) E-Library Training Initiative for another three years with $45,000 annually, expanding Lenny Rhine’s work as a Master trainer to include MLA fellowships recruiting a new cadre of Librarian without Borders trainers. The Elsevier Foundation has supported LWB E-Library Training Initiative since it was founded in 2007. The 2016 – 2018 grants also ensure that the ongoing work to evolve the training infrastructure behind Research4Life is sustained.

 

 



Research4Life to Partner with DOAJ to Ensure the Inclusion of Quality Open-Access Journals

DOAJ-03Research4Life and DOAJ announced a working partnership ensuring that Research4Life-users will have access to the largest possible array of high quality open access journals. The partnership will also highlight the importance of peer reviewed open access material and will explore new syergies between the two organizations.  More information can be read in our blog.

 



New Research4Life Access for UNHCR Refugee Camps  in 2016

7e235273-3a07-4867-99b8-dd67546189abAfter receiving a request regarding the needs of refugees outside of Research4Life eligible countries, the Research4Life General Partners Meeting has approved the inclusion of UNHCR-designated “planned/managed camps” no matter where they are in the world. These camps will be provided Group A or free access. “Planned/managed camps” are the most organized and codified type in the UNHCR taxonomy of types of accommodation. Historically these camps haven’t had access because they are situated in ineligible countries or are under the management of international organizations which are themselves ineligible types of institutions. In 2016, Research4Life will open registration to “planned/managed camps” in forty countries, including six countries that are normally ineligible for the Research4Life Core Offer.

 

 



Update on Proposed New Research4Life Programme: Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI)

39787803-eb0d-42eb-8943-f458b54e7ee3At the last General Partner Meeting in Geneva, GOALI was granted a provisional programme affiliate status. A project team is now in place to set up GOALI within the current Research4Life structure, solicit content from publishers, seek funding and engage with potential UN or international partner organisation. GOALI will submit a full programme proposal at the 2016 Research4Life Partner Meeting. In the meantime, the project team will report to the Research4Life Executive Council on new programme developments.
To support the programme or for more information contact, Liesbeth Kanis.



Oxfam Research, Policy and Practitioner Content Now Included in Research4Life

ec225efa-5449-4b9a-968d-e87e4de0707eResearch4Life currently has over 50,000 peer-reviewed journals, books and reference works in its collection. Through the international NGO Oxfam, we are delighted to extend this offering to include other types of content of value to the researchers, academics, policy-makers and practitioners. Oxfam publishes original research, effectiveness reviews, briefing papers, training manuals, technical briefs, and learning case studies from the field on a broad range of topics concerning development and humanitarian contexts. These include, for example, climate change adaptation, resilience, water and sanitation, public health, food security, livelihoods, and gender analysis.  This ‘grey literature’, published on Oxfam Policy & Practice, is now included in HINARI, AGORA and OARE and supports the sharing of practical expertise and evidence into use. Based on the response to the new Oxfam content, we will likely offer additional high quality grey literature in the future.

 



Elsevier Foundation Grant for Marketing and Communications

1e8ec665-6026-45f8-ad39-16171f2882b9The Research4Life Communications team is very happy to receive a one time grant of $25,000 to support extensive marketing and communications outreach in 2015. Activities will focus on three of the five critical areas identified in the 2015 user and infrastructure reviews,including raising awareness of Research4Life in both the North and the South, engagement with users and participation in training.

 

 



Web and Social Media Update

51cfece3-ff93-49d4-aa29-d7b54002940fTo close a successful 2015 we have an updated website with new features and look. Take a look around and discover some of the new additions to our web portal:

  • New slides in the homepage
  • A footer menu and Newsflash subscription option
  • New Case Study section layout
  • Media Center with promotional material available to the public
  • The Training Portal has new and updated material including a calendar of events.

 



Latest Research4Life Stats & Facts

6140cd9d-ff62-4989-a6f1-09dd5c71a7fdBelow is a breakdown looking at Research4Life as a whole and the different programme elements as of July 2015. Research4Life currently makes available content from some 650 publishers, of whom 208 are full collaborating partners. Of these, 156 provide subscription based content.
 Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 09.44.49

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

WHO’s HINARI program partners with Wolters Kluwer to provide UpToDate to Ebola-affected African countries

8th September 2015

Waltham, Massachusetts September 9th, 2015 – The World Health Organization (WHO)-hosted HINARI program announced a partnership with Wolters Kluwer to provide free access to UpToDate®, its evidence-based clinical decision support resource, to the three countries affected by Ebola (Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea) for an initial period of at least one year.

The main objective of this partnership is to build and strengthen capacity in those countries by providing their health workers with free access to the new developments in physician care, new research and up-to-date clinical information. Having access to the best available information at the point of care will enable them to make better patient management decisions and create resilient health systems able to withstand crisis events like those of the Ebola outbreak.

Beyond this partnership, the UpToDate team from Wolters Kluwer and WHO, along with other HINARI partners, will also be exploring guidance for WHO’s Member States on how their healthcare systems can harness the benefits of evidence-based clinical decision support systems by integrating them into the clinicians’ workflow effectively.

There is solid evidence of the impact that knowledge systems such as UpToDate have on improved outcomes in quality of care, hospital operational efficiencies and clinicians’ capacity building and skills. The WHO Strategy on Research for Health (2012) declares that “health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence.” By adopting innovative data solutions, low- and middle-income countries can leapfrog to a resilient state, bridging the healthcare gap and driving better patient outcomes across the territory.

UpToDate is the world’s premier online clinical decision support resource from the Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. Physician-editors synthesize the most recent medical information into evidence-based and actionable recommendations that clinicians trust to make the right patient management decisions at the point of care. Accessible online through any electronic device (laptop or mobile) UpToDate has been adopted by over 30,000 healthcare institutions across 174 countries worldwide and has become the de facto standard used to answer clinical questions at the point of care.

###

About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (HINARI), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 60,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

André Rebelo
Manager, Global Public & Analyst Relations
UpToDate
Wolters Kluwer Health
Tel: +1.781.392.2411
Andre.Rebelo@WoltersKluwer.com
www.uptodate.com

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

JoMI Joins Research4Life to Bring High-Quality Surgical Teaching Videos to over 100 Countries

2nd July 2015

Boston, Massachusetts July 2nd, 2015 – The Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI, www.jomi.com) announced a partnership with Research4Life that will make the journal’s video articles accessible in over 100 developing countries. Research4Life will provide access to the journal through HINARI, the Access to Research in Health Programme. This partnership will provide 5,700 eligible institutions with an educational resource critical for medical students, residents and attending physicians alike.

The Journal of Medical Insight seeks to mitigate the global discrepancy in patient outcomes between low-volume and high-volume hospitals and surgeons. On a population level, low-volume surgeons’ performance is inferior to that of high-volume surgeons. This trend may be exacerbated in developing countries where The World Health Organization and the Harvard School of Public Health discovered a “scarcity of surgical access in low-income settings.”* Specifically, countries that spend less than $100 per capita on healthcare annually account for 34.8% of the world’s population and only 3.5% of the world’s surgeries.

JoMI’s purpose is to increase surgeons’ intellectual and visual exposure to surgeries. The skills a high-volume surgeon gains from live surgeries are not merely fine-motor. They also gain an overall familiarity with the techniques required, possible complications and how to deal with various pathologies. JoMI provides a means for low-volume surgeons to develop these skills as a part of continuing medical education, in order to help bridge the outcomes gap. Each published article consists of a narrated video, animated visual aids, and a case write-up in order to provide physicians with a comprehensive educational experience.

HINARI’s dedication to improving public health services makes it a natural partner for the Journal of Medical Insight. Launched in 2002 by the World Health Organization, HINARI provides public health workers, researchers and policy-makers in developing countries access to high quality, relevant and timely health information. It is one of four such programs overseen by Research4Life, each of which focuses on research in a different scientific field crucial to the developing world.

“We are very excited to be working with HINARI,” said Nikita Bernstein, CEO of JoMI.  “We founded JoMI to improve clinical outcomes and HINARI presents a unique opportunity to deliver on our mission by facilitating access to the JoMI surgical training videos in the developing world.  We film surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women’s, and other top hospitals, and are excited to extend our resource to those who would otherwise be unable to access it.”

Dr Mohamed Jalloh, Urologist and Surgeon at Hôpital General de Grand Yoff in Senegal expressed enthusiasm about the partnership.“I have been eagerly hoping for just such a journal to be produced,” he said. “My colleagues in Senegal and elsewhere in the HINARI countries will gain much from this opportunity, and look forward to recommending the filming of further procedures of particular relevance to our settings. This approach would be of particular interest in remote areas lacking medical specialists where access to these movies can sustain the competency based learning/practice.’’

###

About JoMI
The Journal of Medical Insight (JoMI) is a surgical video journal dedicated to improving patient outcomes and medical education by publishing high quality surgical teaching videos. Based in Boston, JoMI films at the world’s highest caliber surgical institutions, including Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and the Tufts Floating Hospital for Children. JoMI creates a virtual operating theater, allowing viewers to “scrub-in” and review procedures in a stress-free environment. The journal has released over 30 articles with a focus on orthopaedics and general surgery and is expanding to include all surgical specialities.

 

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (HINARI), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 50,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

Gabriela Mizrahi
JoMI Communications Coordinator
gabriela.mizrahi@jomi.com
Twitter: @JomiJournal
Facebook: Journal of Medical Insight – JoMI

 

*An Estimation of the Global Volume of Surgery: a modeling strategy based on available data. The Lancet.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life’s HINARI Wins MLA’s 2015 Louise M. Darling Medal for Outstanding Health Science Collection

18th May 2015

HINARI Program Manager, Kimberly Parker receives the T. Mark Hodges International Service Award

 

Kimberly Parker (middle) receiving the award.

Kimberly Parker, HINARI program manager (middle) displaying the MLA’s 2015 Louise Darling Medal.

Austin, Texas May 18th 2015The Medical Library Association and Research4Life partnership announced today that the HINARI program has received the MLA’s 2015 Louise Darling Medal for Collection Development in the Health Sciences. Launched in 2002, the HINARI Access to Research in Health program is managed by the World Health Organization in partnership with Yale University Library and over 160 publishers. More than 5,600 public institutions in over 100 eligible countries have access to HINARI which provides access to 14, 000 journals and 33,000 e-books. HINARI is the first of four Research4Life programs which also include AGORA, OARE and ARDI which provide developing countries with free or low cost access to discipline specific peer-reviewed content online.

It is with great pleasure that the Board of Directors of the Medical Library Association joins us in offering our heartfelt congratulations on HINARI’s selection as the recipient of the 2015 Louise Darling Medal for Distinguished Achievement in Collection Development in the Health Sciences, one of MLA’s highest honors. We would like to applaud both HINARI as a program and its driver, Kimberly Parker for outstanding contributions to the field of health sciences librarianship,” said Linda Walton, AHIP President, Medical Library Association.

As one of the six founding HINARI publisher partners, Elsevier is proud to offer a quarter of the content in this critical program,” said Ylann Schemm, Head of Corporate Responsibility, Elsevier and chair of the Research4Life communications team. “Over the past decade, we have seen both HINARI and Research4Life grow exponentially—not only with the number of registered institutions and the content-but also the growth of research output and the use of evidence based medicine in many developing countries.

Kimberly Parker, HINARI Program Manager noted, “This honor is due to the hard work and contributions not just of the HINARI team and the colleagues at Yale who do so much behind the scenes, but also all the publisher partners who have contributed their content and their expertise to help grow the partnership.” Parker will be distinguished with the T. Mark Hodges Award for outstanding individual achievement in promoting, enabling, and delivering improvements in the quality of health information internationally through health information professionals, the improvement of libraries, or an increased use of health information services.

It is largely due to Ms Parker’s leadership that four UN agencies, two US libraries, nearly 200 publishers worldwide, and a group of technical players have successfully worked together in the informal partnership that makes up Research4Life to transform the working lives of tens of thousands of researchers, physicians, and policy makers in the developing world by bringing them access to critical scientific and medical research,” said Richard Gedye, Director of Outreach Programmes, The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers.

###

Notes to Editors:

HINARI and Kimberly Parker, HINARI Program Manager will both be celebrated at the Medical Library Association’s Awards Luncheon at the 2015 Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas scheduled for Monday, May 18 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

###

About the Medical Library Association

Founded in 1898, the Medical Library Association (MLA) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, educational organization of 3,000 individual and institutional members in the health sciences information field that provides lifelong educational opportunities, supports a knowledgebase of health information research, and works with a global network of partners to promote the importance of quality information for improved health to the health care community and the public.

About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities in collaboration with the WHO, FAO, UNEP, WIPO, and technology partner, Microsoft.  Research4Life aims to help attain six of the UNs eight Millennium Development Goals by 2015, reducing the scientific knowledge gap between industrialized countries and the developing world.

Since 2001, the four programmes, Access to Research in Health (HINARI), Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Online Access to Research in the Environment (OARE) and Access to Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI), have grown and developed  to the point where they now give researchers at more than 6,000 institutions in over 100 developing world countries and territories free or low cost online access to over 35,000 peer-reviewed international scientific journals, books, and databases provided by the world’s leading science publishers.

Media Contact:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Access to online resources is transforming health and environmental research

15th May 2015

 

In 2007, when he first joined Makerere University in Uganda as an agricultural librarian trainee, Onan Mulumba spent most of his time re-shelving books. Now he accesses thousands of online journals, books and databases to help farmers deal with pest infestations and plant diseases.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 11.17.23“The (farmers) want an immediate solution because the new crop pests in Uganda are very destructive,” he said. “We can now search the databases to get the knowledge they need.”

The transformation to electronic resources in libraries is part of Research4Life, a UNEP-supported programme whose origins date back to 2000. Studies of research productivity in Canadian, British and American universities have found that productivity is related significantly to access to information resources. Yet 15 years ago, large portions of the world did not have access to the knowledge contained in international scientific publications.

In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) found that 56 per cent of institutions in 75 of the world’s low-income countries—those with annual per capita gross national product (GNP) of under US$1,000—had had no journal subscriptions for the previous five years; 34 per cent of institutions in countries with an annual per capita GNP of US$1,000-3,000 had had no subscriptions for five years; and another 34 per cent averaged only two subscriptions over the past five years. read more

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life Partners Newsletter March 2015

1st March 2015

Table of Contents


Ylann Schemm

Note from the Editor

Dear Partners, The Research4Life Programme is bursting with news for you to enjoy and share with your colleagues and customers. Top of mind is the MLA 2015 Louise Darling Medal which HINARI will receive for their stellar collection development in Health Sciences at the upcoming MLA conference. Well done HINARI! We hope you’ll take some time to browse the newsletter. We have videos, case studies, milestones, program updates and social media campaigns. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and ‘like’ us on Facebook. It should be easier than ever to stay abreast of ourprogram and share the important work we are all supporting with our content and expertise. Interested in getting more involved? We have teams focused on everything from communications to training, fundraising, technology and impact. Contact us at info@research4life.org.
– Ylann Schemm, Chair of the Research4Life Communications Team and Elsevier Foundation Programme Director

New “Unsung Heroes” video launched with Nasra Gathoni

On February 11th we released our latest Research4Life video, featuring “Unsung Hero”, Nasra Gathoni, Medical Librarian at the Aga Khan hospital and two-term AHILA president. We made the video with special support from SAGE, Oxford University Press, Taylor & Francis, Springer and Elsevier. Help us promote the video across your social media channels. The video highlights the important work of one of our “Unsung Heroes” featured in our 2014 case study book.

Kimberly Parker

HINARI wins MLA’s 2015 Louise Darling Medal

The HINARI programme has been awarded the Medical Library Association 2015 Louise Darling Medal for Collection Development in the Health Sciences. Kimberly Parker, HINARI Programme Manager, noted, “This honour is due to the hard work and contributions not just of the HINARI team and the colleagues at Yale who do so much behind the scenes, but also all the publisher partners who have contributed their content.  We would be delighted to have partners join us in Austin, Texas at the MLA awards ceremony on 18 May 2015 so that everyone who contributed to the collection can partake in the recognition.”

New AGORA Web site

We are pleased to announce the launch of the new AGORA Web site at www.fao.org/agora  on 9 February 2015.  The main change is the new domain, clearly expressing the close relationship of AGORA with FAO.  Also, the look and feel have been improved to make the use easier. The new site includes links to the newly updated AGORA training materials and the new Research4Life training portal.

5 Years on: How Are We Doing?

At the July partner meeting, we will discuss two specially commissioned reviews which provide a critical comparator with those done in 2010. Below is a brief overview of what we are looking to achieve. If you are interested in learning more, please contact Richard Gedye, Chair of the Research4Life Executive Council and STM’s Research4Life publisher liaison.

  • The User Experience Review is being conducted by the Natoma Group which successfully conducted the 2010 review. It will provide:
  • Evidence of the rate at which the Research4Life programmes are used
  • Views of users about the value of the programmes to them
  • The impact the programmes have had on their scientific and workplace productivity
  • Factors that constrain the wider use of the programmes.
  • The Infrastructure Review is being conducted by the Research Information Network and is surveying Research4Life’s publisher, administrative, and technical partners in order to:
  • Establish what if any financial costs each partner incurs as a result of participation in the Research4Life initiative
  • Review their level of satisfaction with Research4Life’s operation
  • Make recommendations for the future organization and management of Research4Life.

Spotlight on IFIS, Research4Life Partner

As a not-for-profit, charitable organisation, IFIS’ mission is to communicate and promote knowledge of food, drink and nutrition science, in order to stimulate global education, research and vocational training for the future benefit of humanity. IFIS is committed to improving knowledge, offering access to the FSTA® database to researchers in developing countries through the HINARI and AGORA programmes. Find out more.

Natalia Rodriguez

Meet Natalia Rodriguez, our Research4Life Communications Coordinator

We’re delighted to have Natalia join the Research4Life Communications team as our dedicated, freelance expert on social media. Over the past 6 months, Natalia’s launched effective campaigns to grow our online Research4Life community. Natalia is a communicator based in Germany with a passion for finding innovative ways to communicate science. She holds a B.Sc. in Biology and a M.Sc. in Science Communication from the Technical University in Delft. Her experience is diverse, from working as a deep sea researcher in the Caribbean to designing a science journal in Brisbane, Australia. While finishing her Science Communication degree in 2012, she worked for almost a year with the Elsevier Foundation and the Elsevier Newsroom as an intern. Originally from Colombia, Natalia was herself a HINARI user during her undergraduate marine biology days. Learn more about her work: www.rodrigueznatalia.com.

Brand new: The Monthly Newsflash

Given the huge potential for social media platforms to increase awareness and engagement around our programmes, we have been working to boost our presence through different social channels with the latest information on the partnership and news tailored to researchers and librarians. Over the past six months, our community has grown dramatically. To keep you and your organization informed and supplied with highly share-able news, we have created a quick monthly newsflash with upcoming news, articles and posts about Research4Life. You can help us spread the word by sending the Newsflash to your communications colleagues and community managers.

Research4Life Online:

  • 1100 followers on Facebook
  • 778 followers on Twitter.
  • We are now also present on LinkedIn and Instagram.
  • The traffic in our website has also increased. From May to November 2014, we went from 10,000 to 13,000 page views/month.
  • Posting regular content on our new blog and creating a new Training Portal are some of the strategies we have implemented to keep our audience engaged and to provide educational material to support librarians and researchers.

Have an idea for a post or article to share on our website, social media or Newsflash? Contact Natalia Rodriguez at communications@research4life.org.

Richard Gedye

Update from the Research4Life Executive Council

The Research4Life Executive Council met on 22 January and was chaired by Richard Gedye. The main item on the agenda was a discussion on whether it would be desirable to develop a formal legal entity which could support Research4Life by attracting funding to improve and enhance critical Research4Life infrastructure, training and outreach. For example:-

  • Improving our technology architecture
  • Pursuing more detailed and comprehensive usage statistics
  • Growing our training and capacity building
  • Enhancing communications and marketing to our user communities
  • Facilitating contact and feedback from librarians and end-users

Such a legal entity would have power to seek out and attract funding to enable Research4Life to invest more in training, outreach, and enhancements to its underlying technology – all of which would significantly increase the usage and the usability of our partners’ content in developing countries. But there would of course be resource and perhaps even partnership implications in becoming a legal entity and in embarking on a programme of targeted fundraising from potential donors and sponsors.

Our partners’ views on this are solicited in a section of a survey which is being circulated as part of the Infrastructure review. If you would like to express your views on this issue independently of the survey, please contact Research4Life Publisher Coordinator Richard Gedye through info@research4life.org.

Research4Life Advisors through Mendeley

When Mendeley joined the Research4Life partnership last year, they made the commitment to utilize both their free, cloud-based apps to open up science, as well as their global network of Advisors to help train, educate and increase awareness of research productivity tools.

In January, Mendeley Advisor Fidele Tugizimana, a Rwandan native doing research in South Africa, wrote about how he uses Mendeley to help his research. His work, “Why Mendeley has proved my ideal research companion – an author’s story,” was published in Author’s Connect. Tugizimana said he has found using Mendeley to be a “wonderful, effective and fruitful experience.” Join Fidele and the other Research4Life Advisors in the Mendeley Research4Life Group. We are looking to foster more discussions and connections using the Mendeley platform, but we need your participation and support. Want to learn more? Contact the team at community@mendeley.com

The 2014 HINARI Impact Survey

In 2011, Research4Life launched a user experience competition, asking users to share how HINARI, and its other programmes in the fields of agriculture and the environment, had improved their work, life and community. Making a Difference, a subsequent book of case studies celebrated the stories behind some of these competition entries, providing insights into how access to the results of peer-reviewed research from Research4Life publisher partners was benefiting the health, well-being, and economic and social development of communities in the developing world, as well as contributing to greater environmental health and awareness.

In the wake of Making a Difference, Research4Life approached academic research consultants Information Power in 2014 with a brief to develop a broader view of HINARI’s impact, via the medium of an extensive online survey of known and potential users of the service.
The results:

  • Of the 1034 individuals who responded, 81% were aware of HINARI and 67% defined themselves as HINARI users.
  • Of these users, nearly two-thirds were accessing HINARI at least once a week.
  • Interestingly, when asked when they first started using HINARI, approximately 10% of users revealed that they started in each of the past five years, suggesting that the HINARI user base is growing at a fairly constant annual rate.
  • The full results of the survey are available at http://www.research4life.org/hinari-impact-survey/ Please contact Richard Gedye, Chair of the Research4Life Executive Council for more information.
  • We received some excellent testimonials as well:
  • For us in developing countries, the value of HINARI cannot be overemphasized. It is impossible to conduct meaningful research without access to full text articles of previous research and only HINARI provides this for us in developing countries
  • HINARI and AGORA are the two sources which are complete and user-friendly to me and many colleagues of mine. In the absence if these sources, scientific research and manuscript preparation would be practically improbable to me and many others in Ethiopia.
  • Thank you for making access to publications available to us. I personally value this. I am not where I was 5 years ago as a junior scientist and now on my way to being an independent scientist and training MPH students on research design and conduct. It has greatly improved the quality of my work and the ease with which I work. I cannot thank you enough.
  • As a young optometry student in Ghana, I was introduced to HINARI by a lecturer in the Optometry Dept in KNUST, Ghana, Dr. David Ben Kumah. By this, I downloaded my first journal article in ophthalmic epidemiology. This great introduction and tutorials on how to use HINARI for research, created a passion for research which I will forever be grateful for. Instead of pursuing clinical work after my Doctor of Optometry degree, I competed for a phd scholarship from the European Research Council which was being offered thorough the Waterford Institute of Technology. I am a product of what HINARI access can do. I believe there are many more researchers that are benefiting greatly from this program. Please keep on expanding this program. Thank you.

AHILA Highlights

The 14th Congress of the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA) was held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from 20-24 October, 2014. Several R4L partners attended the Congress including Blessing Chataira and Chipo Msengezi of ITOCA, Gaby Caro of HINARI, Lenny Rhine, Librarians without Borders and Ylann Schemm, Elsevier Foundation.

The theme of the meeting was ‘ICTs, Access to Health Information and Knowledge: Building Strong Knowledge Societies for Sustainable Development in Africa’ – a topic that the R4L programs address. Lenny and Gaby delivered an authorship skills workshop, a HINARI update plus a HINARI users’ meeting with strong representation from the African Users Group. Equally important was all the networking before during and after the sessions including a wonderful gala dinner on the Indian Ocean beach.

Librarians without Borders Update

2014 activities included ‘Train the Trainers’ workshops in Yemen, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Montenegro, Zanzibar and Cambodia and several distance learning courses. Also, the HINARI training material has been significantly updated and streamlined (www.who.int/hinari/training/) with inter-programme material transferred to a new Research4Life Training Portal (www.research4life.org/training/ ).   This material benefits numerous trainers and users. Besides the basic Research4Life training modules, many of the participants at workshops have responded very positively to the Reference Management Software Tools and Authorship Skills material.

Research4Life in the News

Latest Research4Life Stats & Facts

At the start of every year, we take a look at the numbers and growth indicators. Below is a breakdown looking at Research4Life as a whole and the different programme elements. In terms of Research4Life partners, the tally currently stands at 194, with a total of 549 publishers of which 155 provide subscription based content.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life – “Unsung Heroes”: Nasra Gathoni video-story

11th February 2015

A new video by Research4Life – in collaboration with Springer, Elsevier, Oxford University Publishing, SAGE and Taylor & Francis – shows the story of Nasra Gathoni, librarian at the Aga Khan Hospital University Library in Kenya.

Nasra story is part of the “Unsung Heroes”: Stories from the library publication. A selection of stories from librarians making a difference in the developing world.

For more information click here.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

HINARI Impact survey 2014

19th November 2014

Hinari survey coverLaunched in January 2002, HINARI is the oldest programme of the Research4Life partnership.  This programme focuses on bringing peer-reviewed access to the major journals in biomedical and related social sciences to local, not-for-profit institutions in developing countries. Today, after 12 years, 170 publisher partners and up to 400 publishers are offering more than 51,000 information resources through the programme, helping both academic researchers and practising physicians access the latest information in their fields.

Given the success of the programme, Research4Life approached Information Power with a brief to develop a survey in order to get an insight about HINARI’s impact, via the medium of an extensive online questionnaire of known and potential users of the service.

The survey was distributed by a number of HINARI publisher partners to their authors, personal subscribers to journals or table of contents alerts, and others. Individuals were qualified to receive the invitation to participate in the survey if they were resident in any of the 116 HINARI-eligible countries, areas, and territories in the developing world and were registered as having an interest in biomedical research or clinical practice.

The survey attracted a total of 1034 responses from researchers, lecturers, doctors, nurses and government officials from more than 50 countries, helping Research4Life understand how HINARI is being used. All the questions and results are condensed in a pdf file that you can download here.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Revised version of the HINARI Training Portal

15th October 2014

A revised version of the HINARI Training Portal was recently launched. The reorganization had two goals: to update and streamline the basic and advanced Hinari training modules and move the cross-programme Research4Life materials to a new portal.

The HINARI Training Portal has been reorganized into four sections:

  • Basic Course – focuses on skills necessary for accessing and using HINARI resources including basic searching skills, introducing the HINARI portal and PubMed searching
  • Advanced Course – builds on the Basic skills with more sophisticated PubMed options, searching evidence-based resources, discovering e-books, health sources on the Internet, and other HINARI resources
  • Research4life Training Portal – provides a link to a our site that includes material on authorship/publishing skills, reference management software, marketing, managing change, Research4Life programmes’ overview, and links to basic courses for all programmes
  • Online Learning Courses – contains several self-paced courses that take 4-6 hours each and also includes the HINARI Video Series.

These updated and re-organized resources will be useful to trainers and users. Please take a look here: http://www.who.int/hinari/training/en/

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Scientific Research in Africa is Gathering Momentum

8th August 2014

AFRICA has a poor reputation for scientific innovation. But when South Africa jointly won a bid in 2012 to host the world’s largest science project, for a radio telescope called the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), it hoped to foster a new image. “It’s changing the way the world sees us, as somewhere for cutting-edge science and technology,” says SKA’s Bernie Fanaroff. “And also the way we see ourselves.”

SKA’s satellite dishes will eventually span Australia, New Zealand and eight sub-Saharan countries. When complete, hopefully in around a decade, they could be the world’s single largest source of data. That may in turn help host countries develop data-processing skills that will benefit them in other areas of “big data”.

The project is at the forefront of a blossoming of scientific research in Africa. Health care and agriculture are the priorities. Across the continent, programmes are under way to develop seed varieties to withstand Africa’s changing weather. In Uganda, where bananas are a staple, scientists are using genetic modification to boost disease resistance. New strains of cotton and rice are being developed, too.

Read more on The Economist

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Public Access: Getting More Research to More People

6th August 2014

While open access (OA) is by far the most well-known form of public access, it is not the only one. Having spent two days last week at Research4Life meetings in Washington, DC and with today’s announcement that more than 80% of UK local authorities have now signed up for the Access to Research initiative, now seems like a good time to take a look at what else is on offer.

R4L – and especially the HINARI program – is, of course, the Big Kahuna of public access programs. Access is free to WHO Band A countries and costs $1,500 per institution for those in Band B, for a collection of journals whose estimated value is around $10 million. Launched in 2003, its stats today are impressive, with 549 publishers providing access to over 15,300 journals and nearly 30,000 books and other publications in more than 7,300 institutions across 116 countries.

Read more on The Scholarly Kitchen

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

New Research4Life Training Portal

31st July 2014

We are pleased to announce the launching of the Research4Life Training portal (www.research4life.org/training). The goal of this resource is to centrally locate the inter-discipline training material and other training related information from all four Research4Life programmes – HINARI, AGORA, OARE and ARDI. The content of the portal is aimed at librarians, information specialists, scientists, researchers and students. It is divided into six sections:

• About Research4Life programs – overview of the R4L programs and the similarities and differences.

• Authorship Skills – a set of modules to develop authorship skills including how to read and write a scientific paper, copyright and plagiarism, strategies for effective writing and a web-bibliography of useful resources

• Reference Management Tools software – how to use modules on Mendeley, Zotero and EndNoteWeb

• Program Specific Training – links to individual training pages of the programs

• Courses and Workshops – up-to-date information on training options

• Other Resources – additional material about marketing and managing change strategies for Research4Life and information literacy

All the training material can be downloaded for free and distributed/used for training within your institution. Please view the portal, learn about the training related activities and download/use the available resources. If you have any questions or suggestions for other training material, contact info@research4life.org.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Empowering Agricultural Researchers through the Internet

12th June 2014

Scientific research is a vital component of development, but often academics from developing countries have to struggle in order to have access to up-to-date scientific literature, such as international journals, books and databases.

Read more on e-agriculture

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life Newsletter May 2014

13th May 2014

Table of Contents


Note from the Editor

Welcome to the May 2014 edition of our Research4Life Partner Newsletter. Our goal is to keep you updated on Research4Life’s recent news, upcoming meetings, latest milestones, interviews, and partners. We also want to make it possible for you – as a Research4Life partner – to fully leverage and promote your participation in our impressive access initiative.Help us spread the word – and expand the Research4Life community – by following us on Twitter and ‘liking’ us on Facebook. Interested in getting more involved? We have teams focused on everything from communications to training, technology and impact. Contact us at info@research4life.org. – Ylann Schemm, Chair of the Research4Life Communications and Marketing Teams  and Elsevier Foundation Programme Director


“Unsung Heroes: Stories from the Library”

We are proud to present our latest publication, which shares a critical part of the Research4Life story: Unsung Heroes: Stories from the Library celebrates librarians as the ambassadors of a healthy research culture in the developing world. From our 2013 competition and the recommendations of our twelve international judges, we developed nine case studies. These feature librarians from Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria, Honduras, and the Maldives and their early identification of trends, challenges and opportunities from research communities in low and middle income countries. The book leads with stories from Onan Mulumba, Agricultural Librarian for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Makerere University in Uganda, and Cynthia Kimani, Librarian at the Kenya Medical Research Institute Library. We were honoured to have both of them join us at the September Research4Life General Partners Meeting in Rome to celebrate the 10th anniversary of AGORA. We hope you’ll find the book compelling and share both individual case studies and the entire book with your customers and employees. It provides an excellent opportunity to share your organization’s contribution to the partnership.

Interested in creating a tailored print version with your logo and quote for outreach? Contact info@research4life.org.


Research4Life Partner Meeting July 31st 2014 Washington DC

partner_meeting_16fcf907c080fWe will be holding our 2014 General Partners Meeting (GPM) for Research4Life (HINARI, AGORA, OAREand ARDI) on 31st July. As in many years past, it is being generously hosted by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in Washington DC.For those not familiar, the General Partners Meeting is the body which governs our Research4Life partnership and provides an opportunity for every partner to help review the progress, direction and development of the four programmes.

partner_meeting_2cfbeea290add

Emily Gillingham, Chair of the Executive Council

We would like to invite you to join us and help us to continue shaping the programmes through 2015.We hope very much to have a member of the new Advisory Council join us at the meeting as well. At the end of the meeting Emily Gillingham’s role as Chair of the Executive Council will draw to a close and the Chair-elect, Richard Gedye, will take on the mantel. He will be joined by a new – yet to be announced – Chair-elect at that time. We’ll have a chance to thank Emily for her dedicated and excellent contributions to the Executive Council over the past two years. If you’re interested in getting more deeply involved in the partnership and joining us at the upcoming GPM, please contact info@research4life.org.

 


New AGORA Programme Manager

agora_managerWe are pleased to introduce Johannes Keizer as the new AGORA Programme Manager. Since 1998 Johannes Keizer has been working for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN. He heads the team working on Agricultural Information Management Standards and Services. Through the AIMS portal, his team is working on standards, tools and advice for FAOs stakeholders. Some of the main products are AGRIS,the international information system for Agricultural Science and Technology; AGROVOC,the multilingual agricultural concept scheme; the Linked Open Data recommendations for Bibliographic Data;AgriOcean Dspace and AgriDrupal. Now, AGORA and Research4Life are added to this rich portfolio, which is excellent news. Stephen Rudgard, the previous AGORA Programme Manager, has been appointed FAO Representative in Laos effective February 2014. Many thanks to Stephen for his engagement and support to R4L; we wish him all the best in his new endeavor. See Q&A with Stephen Rudgard as AGORA celebrates its 10th anniversary.


10th Anniversary of AGORA

10th_anniversary39d32e

©FAO/Alessia Pierdomenico September 201, Rome, Italy – FAO Director General José Graziano da Silva, right awarding Onan Mulumba in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the Research4Life Library Competition at the 10th Anniversary of AGORA Sheykh Zayed Media Center, FAO headquarters.

September 2013 marked the 10th anniversary of Research4Life’s AGORA agricultural program –coordinated by FAO, together with major publishers – which provides over 2,300 institutions in over 100 developing countries with free or low-cost access to leading journals in the fields of agriculture, fisheries, food, nutrition, veterinary science and related biological, environmental and social sciences. Last year, the Research4life Library Competition recognized the role of librarians in building research capacity and boosting output among scientists, doctors and policy makers. Onan Mulumba, a librarian at Makerere University in Uganda, won the 2013 competition. He was honoured during the AGORA anniversary celebrations at FAO Headquarters. An Honourable Mention for a second case study was also awarded to Cynthia Kimani, librarian at the Kenya Medical Research Institute Library.

 

 

 


Mendeley joins Research4Life

mendeley_1f86658Mendeley, a global research collaboration platform and academic database, has pledged to collaborate with Research4Life to boost researcher skills in eligible countries. Mendeley’s free cloud-based apps will enable researchers to organize, share and discover new research with other scientists all over the world. Within Research4Life countries, Mendeley currently has thousands of active researcher users and hundreds of global Advisors to help train, educate and increase awareness about how make the most of these research productivity tools.

mendeley_2

Jessica Reeves, Head of User Engagement, Mendeley

Jessica L. Reeves, Mendeley’s Head of User Engagement, explains, “We are committed to making researchers aware of our free reference management and academic collaboration tools, educating users through our Resource Center, as well as growing the global Mendeley Advisor community, to support researchers in developing countries. Through this community, we hope to celebrate and promote Research4Life stories of success and collaboration. We really look forward to working with the partnership to further our mission of opening science through technology for all researchers, especially in developing countries.”

 

 

 

 


Global Online Access to Law (GOAL)

goalda50beResearch4Life is committed to extending its partnerships and outreach. This includes exploring new programmes that fit our objectives in Beyond the 2015 Horizon, Research4Life’s strategic plan. Global Online Access to Law (GOAL) proposes to provide free and low cost online access to academic legal content to institutions in developing countries. Key subject areas would include international law and human rights law to help strengthen legal frameworks and institutions in developing countries, while furthering the rule of law. The fulfilment of basic rights is essential for advancing peace and security, and often a prerequisite for economic development. They also enable people to enjoy their full rights as citizens in society. While still in an exploratory phase, GOAL is designed to help strengthen the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which relate to the rule of law (Access to Information and Access to Justice). The SDGs are currently being considered for inclusion by UN working groups as part of the post-2015 development agenda. In short, we are seeking support from publishers, academic institutions, international organizations and funding bodies to GOAL as a new Research4Life programme. If you would like to find out more about GOAL or pledge support as we develop GOAL, contact Liesbeth Kanis, Research4Life liaison for Brill Publishers at info@research4life.org.


Assessing the Impact of Research4Life

assessing_impact

Every five years, Research4Life commissions two external reviews of its programmes. One review looks at the programmes from the point of view of the contributing partners, assessing how well the infrastructure and operations are performing. The second review examines the user experience through online surveys and face to face interviews to determine how successfully we’re increasing access to world-leading science and encouraging use. We are currently developing our plans for commissioning our next set of reviews for presentation and discussion at the 2015 General Partners Meeting. By design, these reviews look critically at our infrastructure and performance, highlighting any issues or constraints and proposing ways in which these may be addressed.

This philosophy has proved invaluable over the last 13 years and has led to a succession of improvements in the way we deliver our programmes. To complement these formal reviews, however, we also regularly undertake activities designed to focus on the positive impacts of our programmes. Hence our development and documentation of specific case studies – of individual researchers and practitioners in our recent booklet, Making a Difference: Stories from the field, and of librarians in our new publication, Unsung Heroes: Stories from the Library. In addition, this year we also want to gain wider insight into the positive impacts which our programmes have within our end-user communities by launching a HINARI user impact survey. Our first 2014 survey, which was carried out for us by independent consultancy Information Power, asked HINARI users to tell us how they use the content and to identify whether it enhances the way they conduct research or carry out clinical practice. Information Power is currently analysing the results and we hope to be able to bring you a summary of these in our next newsletter.

Questions about impact analyses or our systematic reviews? Contact Richard Gedye at info@research4life.org.


Feedback from our Research4Life Advisory Council

In 2013, we formed a new Advisory Council which has met quarterly over the past year. The Advisory Council includes academic librarians from institutions across Africa. Our objectives include providing a forum for direct engagement between the user community and the R4L partnership, as well as supporting the early identification of trends, unmet needs, problems and opportunities from the research and library communities in developing countries. We also hope to nurture new Research4Life champions, increase international exposure and provide opportunities for professional development amongst key stakeholders. Please contact Emily Gillingham at info@research4life.org for more briefings. The Advisory group met most recently on March 27th, with some 10 members of the community. Feedback included: • Addressing the need for customizable posters, banners and materials to hand out in institutions. • Tackling the bandwidth issues on a strategic alliances level; you can’t significantly boost usage if a researcher has to download a PDF article over 5 hours at night in order to do basic research. • Most developing country researchers don’t know R4L, only HINARI or the specific programs. • Lots of great Research4Life marketing discussion with librarians in the Research4Life User Forum. • Many health librarians are not just marketing HINARI internally but also outside their own institutions to community health workers. • Training and outreach is not enough: librarians have to advocate for support directly from management through annual work plans.


ITOCA Training Workshops in 2014

itoca_1c0dc63

Under the new Research4Life training strategy, ITOCA (Information Training & Outreach Centre for Africa) has delivered two train-the-trainer workshops in Botswana and Nigeria to date and four more courses are planned for 2014 in Ethiopia (May), Uganda (July), Sierra Leone (August) and Tanzania (September). The new training strategy aims to integrate programme awareness, usage and sustainability by providing various mediums for the uptake of the resources beyond the training. The main focus is on getting the buy-in and support from decision makers in the user institutions before a training workshop, as well as inviting university management to the official opening or closing ceremonies, enabling the university leadership to participate in and understand Research4Life’s goals, including the necessity of investing in a solid ICT infrastructure to enable access.

itoca_2fdd995

University of Ibadan workshop 3/2014

I appreciate the publishers and the management and staff of ITOCA for the initiative, and benefits they have brought to [the] developing world by enhancing teaching and research through provision of quality and up-to-date information.” — Participant, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. The University of Ibadan’s Kenneth Dike Library hosted the Research4Life Nigeria workshop from 24-26 March 2014. The training workshop was formally opened by Dr. Benedict Oladele, the University Librarian. Professor Dele Fawole, the ITOCA Representative for West Africa, emphasised the value of the Research4Life programmes and how they provided access to resources which are often not even available in many Western institutions. The Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic), Professor. A.I. Olayinka also confirmed the University of Ibadan’s support and their willingness to ensure ongoing training for staff and students. ITOCA has found that support from the university management is critical to the continued uptake of the Research4Life and TEEAL programmes.

To learn more, contact Blessing Chataira through info@research4life.org


HINARI Trainers Group Nepal

hinari_1c38e276075e8In 2007, four health librarians from different institutions across Nepal formed the HINARI Trainers Group. From the beginning their goal has been to stimulate research in the biomedical and health fields and promote the use of HINARI resources through training, a user discussion forum, and developing models for other country user groups.

Since its launch, the Group has conducted 12 training sessions at institutions including the Nepal Health Research Council, Lordbudhha Nursing College, Institute of Medicine.

hinari_2b84dda999d4aNursing College, Manmohan Nursing College, STUPA College, ALKA Nursing College, Norvic Nursing College, Nobel College, ASIAN College, and Chakravarti Nursing College. In 2011, the Nepal Trainers Group was awarded a Research4Life Master Trainer Certificate from the Medical Library Association. This year’s activities include a marketing campaign to spread awareness of HINARI, enhancing internal communication in the group, and setting up distance learning courses to further disseminate HINARI. Interested in learning more? Follow the Nepal HINARI Trainers Group on Facebook.


Marketing Research4Life in Central and West Africa

marketing378024d8dcefHistorically, West and Central Africa have been low usage areas for Research4Life. Of the 3,000 African institutions registered in 2012, only 300 came from these regions. But in 2013-2014, ITOCA received a targeted marketing grant from the Elsevier Foundation to boost awareness and usage of Research4Life in these countries. In addition to training workshops in DR Congo and Sierra Leone, ITOCA launched an intensive marketing and outreach campaign aimed at the research and academic communities in ten West and Central African focus countries. Letters were sent to thousands of carefully compiled contact people targeting both users and non-users, and ITOCA visited key conferences in the region. For users with questions or problems, the ITOCA staff provided an email, phone and listserv, and dedicated helpdesk service. Due to end in June 2014, the targeted marketing campaign has already reaped significant results. There was a 16% increase in the number of R4L registrations, reaching 427 institutions in March 2014. The highest numbers of new institutions have been registered in DR Congo with 30 institutions (20%) and Niger with 10 institutions (24%). Angola, Chad, Guinea, Liberia and Mauritania have significant new registrations recorded to date and this positive trend is expected to continue upwards as the marketing efforts continue.

Questions? Contact Gracian Chimwaza through info@research4life.org.


Librarians Without Borders: Building the Training Infrastructure

MLA_1Over the course of 2013, MLA’s Librarians Without Borders® continued their extensive training and curriculum development to enable hundreds of doctors, nurses, librarians and researchers in low and middle income countries to develop the skills they need to use Research4Life resources. In 2013, 252 people from Albania, Macedonia, Samoa, Ethiopia, and Haiti (all low usage countries) were trained through workshops often in collaboration with the WHO, and in Africa, with the Information Training & Outreach Centre in Africa (ITOCA).

These users, many of whom are now trainers in their own right, will help to boost R4L usage over the coming years. MLA_2Workshops at the University of Florida and at the Medical Library Association meeting last May also helped to develop a new set of US trainers. Direct results include: the University of Southern California set up a HINARI and authorship skills training for all graduate students from eligible countries; Ohio State University established a Research4Life training partnership at the University of Gondor in Ethiopia; while Tulane and Johns Hopkins Universities have established a joint training programme to prepare graduate students returning to eligible countries. Finally, Lenny Rhine also spent a generous portion of 2013 developing and updating the online and onsite training infrastructure behind Research4Life. In 2014, Lenny will work with the ARDI team to create an initial training module, and will also undertake further updates for the three older programs to reflect new software developments and other training needs. The 2012 and January-August 2013 download statistics for HINARI training materials totaled more than 200,000 per year (ca 16,000 per month). This level of usage underscores the importance of these materials for trainers and users, and the necessity of keeping them up-to-date to advance the Research4Life mission. Interested in learning more about Librarians Without Borders? Contact Lenny Rhine through info@research4life.org.


New Content Management Partner Team

new_contentSince Research4Life was launched some 13 years ago, a hidden -but integral -part of the programmes has been the management and maintenance of all the details of the journals, databases and books that lie behind the user portals. This is as difficult as it sounds: different academic partners and programme offices have been involved at different points and with varying amounts of time to spend on tasks. Rarely has there been time to actually look at the hows and whys of our database structures, our formats and categories, and our processes and communications. So this year, we’ve formed a task force to step back, review, revise, and update, with an eye towards balancing efficiency with adjustments that could improve the user experience. Questions? Contact Kimberly Parker, Team leader and HINARI Programme Manager, through info@research4life.org.


Research4Life at SSP Annual Meeting

forthcoming_1Richard Gedye will be representing Research4Life on a panel session entitled “Publishers and the Developing World: Philanthropy, Partnerships, Markets” at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Scholarly Publishing on Friday 30 May in Boston. The panel will share what they have discovered about the impact that their current activities are having in target communities and will then respond to a series of questions.


Collaborative Training Programme with INASP

inaspOur collaborative training project in Sierra Leone with INASP is progressing well, with the first workshops taking place next month. The programme will kick off with a series of workshops 1- 8 May in Freetown and Njala, addressed to three separate constituencies: relevant Vice Chancellors and academic leaders; Researchers and Librarians. INASP’s Anne Powell and Research4Life Trainer Lenny Rhine have been working together with local Sierra Leone trainer Miriam Conteh-Morgan to collate appropriate content from our respective training materials into a seamless teaching programme for the workshops.

Research4Life Latest Stats & Facts

• 7700 registered institutions
• 14,500 journals
• 30,000 books
• 185 publisher partners

8c7fb277-d142-47ab-8c8a-95ee4cde2cd4

Latest Research4Life News

• 2014, 7 March Health News NG: Research4Life Programmes Training-of-Trainer Workshop
• 2014, 27 January: Research4Life’s HINARI featured at World Health Organization
• 2014, 9 January: New Authentication Live
• 2013, 23 December: Africa doubles research output over past decade, moves towards a knowledge-based economy – Research Trends
• 2013, 13 November: Watch the FAO webcast on the 10th Anniversary of AGORA from Rome, Italy – FAO Director General José Graziano da Silva
• 2013, 1 November: Wiley blog A new Research4Life Training Strategy in Africa
• 2013, 18 September: FAO United Nations – Food and Agriculture Organization Radio: 10th anniversary of Research4Life’s AGORA agricultural program
• 2013, September: Elsevier Connect, Q&A with Stephen Rudgard as AGORA celebrates its 10th anniversary
• 2013 September: Elsevier Connect Case study: Research4Life and its impact on an agronomist in Burkina Faso
• 2013, 21 August: Research4Life featured in the WHO World Health Report 2013


Promoting Your Research4Life Partnership

promoting.18aca6afc1676Don’t forget, if you are a Research4Life partner, you can access Research4Life promotional materials including logos, web banners, flyers, brochures, boiler plate and presentations, and other information at a special partner-only link. As a partner, you can also choose to customize your Research4Life brochure or the Making a Difference and Unsung Heroes booklets with a quote and logo. For more information, please contact Charlotte Masiello-Riome, Research4Life Communications Coordinator at communications@research4life.org.

 


Looking for a Fundraiser? Donate to Research4Life!

We are always asked by partners to suggest different ways that individuals and society members can contribute to Research4life. Don’t forget that Research4Life is also an excellent charity for an office fundraiser. If you or any of your society members would like to contribute funds to Research4Life training or outreach, you can support Research4Life through www.who.int/hinari/donation/en

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn

Research4Life’s HINARI featured at World Health Organization

27th January 2014

WHO recently featured HINARI, with special interviews with Research4Life user and Director-General of Sudan’s Central Medical Supplies Public Corporation, Gamal Khalafalla Mohamed Ali, who heads the national agency responsible for getting medical supplies to all public health institutions.

For the full feature visit the WHO feature page.

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterEmail this to someoneShare on LinkedIn