Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Information in Action: Celebrating Research Advocacy Champions

12th July 2017

Research4Life and INASP present “Information in Action: Celebrating Research Advocacy Champions” a booklet made in partnership with INASP that showcases the best stories from the 2016 Research4Life/INASP Advocacy Competition

In 2016, Research4Life and INASP launched a competition to celebrate the critical role of advocacy in research and got a resounding response. More than 150 stories rolled in from researchers, doctors and librarians across the developing world. Many of them shared the hurdles they had overcome to boost leadership support for peer reviewed resources and for evidence-based policies based on that critical information. These include resources to improve access, infrastructure and funding, all of which contribute to improved evidence-based health care, agriculture and environmental policies.

To celebrate their work we collected and curated seven of the most impactful case studies including the stories of the two winners:

  • Alice Matimba, whose multidisciplinary team successfully advocated for a health policy that has transformed the care and treatment offered to patients diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy and other eye complications.
  • Mary Acanit, whose management team successfully advocated for the connection of Kyambogo University to the Research and Education Network for Uganda (RENU), which aims to connect all Ugandan universities, colleges and research institutions via an affordable country-wide high speed network backbone for cheaper & faster access to global research resources.

If reading this book inspires you to learn more, whether as a participating institution, publisher, technology partner, journalist, donor, or policymaker, please contact us at: info@research4life.org.

Download the booklet

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Elsevier Adds ClinicalKey to Research4Life Access Program for Developing Countries

25th May 2017

Physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals in under-resourced communities around the world to receive access to the latest clinical information

Philadelphia, PA, May 25, 2017 – Elsevier, the information analytics company specializing in science and health, will add ClinicalKey to its global research and health resources available through Research4Life starting in June 2017. The expansion of the Research4Life access program with ClinicalKey benefits healthcare professionals in under-resourced, low- and middle-income communities around the globe.

ClinicalKey is Elsevier’s premier clinical search engine, providing access to the most current scientific and medical information, and it will help Research4Life meet the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) declaration that health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence.

“In 2012 the WHO Strategy on Research declared that health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence – and so we are delighted that ClinicalKey will help us grow the evidence-based medicine materials available for low- and middle-income countries through Hinari and provide an expanded basis for the informed decision-making of practitioners and policymakers,” said Kimberly Parker, Hinari Programme Manager. Hinari is part of the Research4Life program managed by the WHO, in partnership with Yale University, and provides access to health and medical research.

As a founding partner of Research4Life, Elsevier contributes more than a quarter of the 77,000 peer-reviewed journals, books and scholarly databases that are available through the program. Access to ClinicalKey adds to an existing collection of research resources offered by Elsevier, including ScienceDirect and Scopus. Elsevier also provides technical, strategic and communications expertise to help advance and promote Research4Life.

Dr. Kristina Krohn, Health Frontiers Field Representative in Laos, said she was gratified to see how the Lao doctors reacted the first time they had access to medical journal articles through Hinari. “The Lao resident doctors devoured everything,” said Dr. Krohn. “Hopefully ClinicalKey can help them sort through the medical literature without getting overwhelmed by the sheer amount of information available.”

Dr. John Danaher, President of Clinical Solutions at Elsevier, said, “Making ClinicalKey available to doctors and nurses in developing countries through Research4Life will help those medical professionals utilize the latest evidence-based clinical information to achieve the best outcomes for their patients.”

Adding ClinicalKey to Research4Life follows Elsevier’s recent agreement to provide ClinicalKey to Doctors without Borders and strengthens Elsevier’s commitment to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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About Research4Life
Research4Life is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research for Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to 77,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences. www.research4life.org

About Elsevier
Elsevier is a global information analytics company that helps institutions and professionals progress science, advance healthcare and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier provides digital solutions and tools in the areas of strategic research management, R&D performance, clinical decision support, and professional education; including ScienceDirect, Scopus, ClinicalKey and Sherpath. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 35,000 e-book titles and many iconic reference works, including Gray’s Anatomy. Elsevier is part of RELX Group, a global provider of information and analytics for professionals and business customers across industries. www.elsevier.com

Media Contacts:

Christopher Capot
Global Communications, Elsevier
+1 917 704 5174
c.capot@elsevier.com

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

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Call for Applications ! Online Course on Access to Scientific Information Resources in Agriculture (ASIRA) for Low-Income Countries

22nd May 2017

Please find below a Call for Applications to attend the Online Course on  Access to Scientific Information Resources in Agriculture (ASIRA) for Low-Income Countries.


We are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the 3rd edition of the online ASIRA course for the period of June 19th – July 14th, 2017.  

The main goal of the course is to provide a platform to enhance the visibility, accessibility and usability of data and information in the agricultural domain, particularly in low-income countries.

Since February 2017, over 150 participants from 33 different countries have been trained through ASIRA. Please see the course web site for more information.

WHO CAN APPLY? Academics, researchers, librarians and postgraduate (master and PhD) students who work in the fields of agricultural sciences can apply to the course. Group A and group B Research4Life eligible countries, respectively, have the priority in the selection process.
HOW TO APPLY?

 

Use the Online registration form or pdf. This registration form must be completed, signed and submitted to agora@fao.org
WHEN TO APPLY?

 

The submission deadline is June 4th, Sunday by 23:00 CEST for both online and pdf via email submissions.

Selection of participants will be finalised by June 9th and successful candidates will be emailed afterwards.

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Finding AGORA resources by keyword – Literature Research with Summon

17th May 2017

(Image credit: pixabay.com, CC0 license)

We are pleased to announce three upcoming webinars in English, French and Spanish about how to search AGORA  with Summon. Summon facilitates literature research on the AGORA portal enabling the user to search resources by keyword, filter search results, save search items and to export citations. AGORA’s main purpose is to improve the quality and effectiveness of agricultural research, education and training in low- and middle-income countries.  AGORA/Research4Life provides free or low cost access to peer-reviewed journals (to date, 6,500), datasets and e- books (to date, 22,000) in agriculture and related biological, environmental, social and other research domains.

The upcoming webinar will present Summon functionalities and how they can be used to effectively search the AGORA platform.  Participants can choose between the English, French or Spanish version of the seminar.

PRESENTERS

[English] Kristin Kolshus is an Information Management Specialist at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Regional Office for Africa. She focuses on capacity development on access to scientific information, information management, and knowledge sharing, especially through AGORA and Research4Life.

 

[French] Alice Van der Elstraeten is Information Management Specialist at the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO). She works mainly on capacity development and experience capitalisation for the e-Agriculture Community of Practice. Based in Panama, she is the e-Agriculture and AGORA focal point for Central America.

 

[Spanish] Maria Folch, working at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) for more than 15 years, is currently in charge of the AGORA helpdesk and contact with users. She also collaborates in the organization and preparation of AGORA training materials in Spanish and participates as facilitator in Central America workshops.

DATE AND REGISTRATION

  • EN: 29th of May 2017 – 11:00 CEST (Use Time Converter to calculate the time difference)
  • FR: 31st of May 2017 – 16:00 CEST (Use Time Converter to calculate the time difference)
  • ES: 8th of June 2017 – 16:00 CEST (Use Time Converter to calculate the time difference)

Please register here: https://goo.gl/forms/aZNvhBh8FDrQKuD12

View this announcement in French: http://aims.fao.org/fr/activity/blog/retrouver-des-ressources-dans-agora-par-mot-cle-utiliser-summon

View this announcement in Spanish: http://aims.fao.org/es/activity/blog/participe-en-el-seminario-en-linea-investigacion-bibliografica-sobre-la-nutricion

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AGORA : Tracking Usage Growth : April 2017

2nd May 2017

AGORA (Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture) is one of the four programmes making up Research4Life (R4L) facilitated by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. AGORA’s goal is to provide free or low cost access (complementary to open access) to peer-reviewed journals (to date: 9.020) and e-books (to date: 22.793) in agriculture and related biological, environmental and social sciences. 

R4L provides a big share of peer-reviewed contents for free to institutions in group A countries and for a small fee to group B countries.

By bringing key scientific literature to students, researchers and scientists, AGORA portal has “become a crucial tool for some of the world’s poorest countries [as] access to information is key to develop agriculture and ensure food security” (R4L Press Release).

The most noticeable development in AGORA’s usage context – during the last months – has been the upward growth of the number of institutions registered with AGORA/R4L programme.

In particular, during the month of April 201736 AGORA requests were processed. We got 17 new institutions – from the Group A countries (12 Myanmar and  1 from Cameroon,  Guatemala, Ghana, Sudan and Nepal) and 4 new institutions – from Group B (3 from Pakistan and 1 from Argentina). 

AGORA : Eligibility: Group A and Group B

Thus, the total of registered institutions at 30 of April 2017 is 3147 (2445 group A and 702 group B). 

More about AGORA:

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ECS Partners with Research4Life to Help Close the Knowledge Gap in the Developing World

1st April 2017

All ECS content will be accessible to over 8,200 institutions

ECS is partnering with Research4Life to provide accessibility to over 132,000 articles and abstracts published in the ECS Digital Library. All papers published by ECS will be free to access for more than 8,200 institutions in an effort to reduce the scientific knowledge gap between high-income and low- and middle-income countries by providing free or affordable access to critical scientific research.

The ECS Digital Library is home to the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, the flagship journal of ECS, published continuously since 1902, and to the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, ECS Electrochemistry Letters, ECS Solid State Letters, Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters, ECS Transactions, ECS Meeting Abstracts, ECS Proceedings Volumes and the ECS quarterly membership magazine, Interface.

The research published in ECS journals directly addresses the sustainability of our planet, with topics ranging from renewable energy storage and conversation to clean water and sanitation.

“Open access, especially in electrochemistry and solid state science, is an important goal for scientific and technological development and, quite simply, creating a better world.” says Roque Calvo, executive director of ECS. “ECS’s partnership with Research4Life is a step toward ensuring that everyone working on these issues, wherever they are in the world, has access to the latest research.”

Since 2002, Research4Life has been partnering with publishers and is now provide scientific knowledge to institutions in 119 countries, areas, and territories in the developing world. They are enabling more than 8,000 institutions to benefit from online access of up to 77,000 peer-reviewed scientific journals, books, and databases. ECS will be joining more than 170 publishers already partnered with Research4Life.

“We are pleased to welcome ECS as a Research4Life partner,” says Daniel Dollar, chair of the Research4Life executive council. “ECS’s commitment to Research4Life will help to advance the partnership’s goal of reducing the scientific knowledge gap between industrialized countries and the developing world.”

This partnership aligns directly with ECS’s Free the Science initiative, aimed at making all research published in the ECS Digital Library freely available to all readers, while remaining free for authors to publish. ECS believes that the opening and democratizing of this information will lead to rapid advances in some of the world’s most pressing issues.

Free the Science can assist people all over the world who need the content to create their own solutions to sustainability,” Calvo says. “Our work with Reserch4Life give us the chance to show some of that vision to the world.”

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ASIRA Online Course Webinars: Recordings and slides are available online

10th March 2017

A.S.I.R.A.  (Access to Scientific Information Resources in Agriculture online course for low-income countries – started on 13 February, 2017 – is in its last week. The course was enriched by a number of webinars designed to strengthen the course content, give course participants broader perspective in the relevant areas.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

The four-week online course ASIRA has been delivered by the FAO of the United Nations in collaboration with Research4Life.

ASIRA’s goal is to provide a platform to enhance the visibility, accessibility and usability of agricultural data and science, particularly in low-income countries.

The course webinars were opened to the public interested in the course topics.

We would like to thank our speakers who delivered great talks on the respective topics and our participants to create interactive environments with their questions and discussions.

Each of the webinar recording and the slides were made available afterwards. You may find them all here listed by the webinar dates:

15 February 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: Emerging Themes in Agricultural Research Publishing by Thomas Ingraham, Publishing Editor at F1000Research

Recording: https://goo.gl/ddlvCK

Slides: https://goo.gl/80EUf1

17 February 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: New Roles for Changing Times: UNAM Subject Librarians in Context by Chenjerai Mabhiza, Head of User Services at the University of Namibia

Recording: https://goo.gl/2GYti0

Slides: https://goo.gl/mmzmQG

21 February 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: Providing Access to Agricultural Research and Technology Information and Exploiting Open Data on the Web by Thembani Malapela, Knowledge and Information Management Officer at the FAO of the UN

Recording: https://goo.gl/SM3toI

Slides: https://goo.gl/otcraH

 22 February 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) by Kristin Kolshus, Information Management Specialist at the FAO of the UN

Recording: https://goo.gl/8vfAWd

Slides: https://goo.gl/mM3ymb

24 February 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: Introduction to Using TEEAL to Access Agricultural Journals by Joy Paulson, Director of the TEEAL Project and the International Projects Librarian at Mann Library, Cornell University 

Recording: https://goo.gl/ATH0u0

Slides: https://goo.gl/UueXbS

1 March 2017

Webinar@ASIRA: AuthorAID: Supporting Developing Country Researchers in Publishing Their Work by Jennifer Chapin, Programme Manager of AuthorAID and  Coordinator of Research and Communication at INASP 

Recording: https://goo.gl/zQ0yFH

Slides: https://goo.gl/9IxJIu

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Online Course on Access to Agricultural Data is Now Open for Registration!

12th January 2017


ASIRA online course for low-income countries is delivered by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with Research4Life. The course registration is open from  11th  to 27th January,  2017.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

The goal of this online free course is to provide a platform to enhance the visibility, accessibility and usability of agricultural data and science, particularly in low-income countries.

The course is designed to serve the needs of researchers, librarians and students who are operating in agricultural science in becoming familiar with academic publishing landscape, latest trends, and using scholarly information resources efficiently including the legal aspect of the field.

ASIRA will be facilitated by experts who will create active participation in the online environment, engage learners, tie the course to the real life practices, act as a guide and provide feedback to the learners.  

The course will start on February 13th and last for four weeks until March 10th, 2017. It consists of 3 units including 8 lessons as follows:

Unit I: Scientific Publishing Landscape
Lesson 1: The scientific publishing landscape
Lesson 2: Overview of research and publishing environment in agricultural sciences
Lesson 3: Local information and global access systems
Unit II: Accessing scientific information resources in agriculture
Lesson 4: Identifying information sources
Lesson 5: Using information sources
Lesson 6: Information resources in agricultural sciences
Unit III: Using search results
Lesson 7: Citing and referencing
Lesson 8: Intellectual property and copyright

Participants will be provided with access to all of the relevant course materials as well as online discussion forums, webinars, videos and additional materials.

The course is open to anyone working in agricultural science related institution or studying in agricultural and related sciences can apply for the course. Priority will be given to anyone from Research4Life eligible countries. Group A and Group B respectively. Those who pass the end of course exam successfully will be awarded with a course completion certificate.

Applications must be submitted by January 27th 2017. Please send the completed Registration Form  (.pdf  .doc or online) and a signed Confirmation Letter form (.pdf or .doc) to agora@fao.org.

Online submission of the Registration Form is also accepted and no need to resubmit the soft copy to the given email address.

You may find the course background information in detail and necessary forms in the attached documents:

If you have any questions or queries, please email us at agora@fao.org.

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Zimbabwe workshop on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture

15th December 2016

agora_zimbabwe-group

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO of the UN) in conjunction with several partners has organized a series of training workshops in 2016 across Asia and Africa focused on access to research in agriculture and fisheries. Earlier, workshops were held in NamibiaMyanmar, Tanzania and Ghana. A similar workshop took place in Harare, Zimbabwe 8-9 November 2016.

Tailored to researchers the workshops are aimed at drawing attention to the scope of free online agricultural information available on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORAand AGRIS (International System for Agricultural Science and Technology) and in effectively using these resources. Alongside this core focus, the workshops raise awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, with a look at the further range of resources available to researchers in agricultural research, and on Research4Life.

Background

Sub-Saharan Africa, as a whole, is facing several major challenges among them climate change, diminishing land and water resources, post-harvest losses, and population growth that are exacerbating the food insecurity situation of millions of people, especially in rural communities. These require innovative solutions and access to open data could contribute to the solutions.

FAO strongly believes that success in agricultural and rural development depends on individual actions of millions of rural family farmers, whose decisions are shaped by the information, knowledge and technologies available to them.  Therefore, easy availability and access to agriculture and rural development related data, knowledge and technologies, contributes to enhancing rural livelihoods and food security.

Open Data – data that anyone can access, use and share, and Open Science – transparency in experimental methodology, observation, and collection of data, coupled with the rapid diffusion of the latest knowledge and broader participation in the discovery of new knowledge play a key role in this context. Open Data is already contributing to agriculture and rural development. It is facilitating information and communication technology based innovations targeting farmers in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. It is making it possible to develop applications and services that are helping to keep farmers informed of various issues that affect their work: from pest prevalence and weather predictions to crop growth and market prices.

Workshop: approach

While there are a huge amount of research resources on AGORA and AGRIS, making effective searches on both platforms requires know-how, and the idea is for the workshop to train researchers to get the best out of the two programs so that they can share this knowledge back in their institutions.

The workshops provide an overview of both databases, with guidance on searching through the range of free and low-cost research materials and training on some of the new trends and challenges in open science, open access and open data in agriculture. As well as an overview of intellectual and copyright a further section of the workshop looks at existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google ScholarGoogle BooksAquatic CommonsPubAg, and TEEAL.

Participant feedback

  • Quite an informative workshop which enlightened on issues to do with Intellectual property as well as copyright and Open access as well as Open Science
  • overall the workshop was very interesting, informative and discussions stimulating
  • The training was a great move, and i was happy to be part of it, I left the workshop an AGORA and AGRIS ambassador!
  • The workshop is quite relevant to my work. I can now use the databases confidently and am sure this will help me in my research career and studies. Well organized.
  • Excellent workshop. Thoroughly enjoyed every bit.
  • Thanks for broadening my knowledge on resource access. The workshop was very useful especially since it can be difficult finding good data in Zimbabwe.
  • This was an excellent training which has equipped me with strong skills to use open data for research in my technical field. It is my hope and wish that we have such trainings annually as it is so useful.
  • The workshop has been of great help and enlightening especially to encourage use of the Research4Life engine
  • The workshop was valuable and enriched my knowledge in research aspects.             
  • The workshop was very informative and educative and very practical. Good workshop to enhance the capacity of researchers to research information online.
  • Workshop was quite refreshing and a few new things were learnt. More awareness should constantly be spread among scientists, researchers and scholars on these platforms of accessing information.                        
  • The workshop was important and has equipped us with skills on how to use open access journal

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI,AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provides low-income countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.

The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research.

Set up by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO of the UN) together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides low-income countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, with a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in low-income countries. Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network and alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge.

Organizers

FAO organized the workshop in conjunction with GODANITOCA,AIMSAGORA and Research4Life.

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Why Should We Care About Information Access?

14th November 2016

The spread of diseases is not limited by geographic boundaries, people everywhere must be able to use the most recent research to better manage diseases.

 

img_0411_highres_brenda_kim_barbara_closeupHeld at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, “Information Access in the Developing World. Why Should We Care? How Does Research4Life Make a Difference” was the seminar presented by Kimberly Parker – Hinari Program Manager – on the past September 6th.

The seminar was organized through the Open Dartmouth Working Group,  and sponsored by the Dartmouth College Library and the Center for Health Equity at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. More than 40 faculty, students, and staff from the Dartmouth and DHMC community and visitors from the region engaged in a lively discussion following the presentations, with audience members sharing their particular experiences in information access to the developing world.

During her talk, Kimberly pointed out, that the spread of diseases “is not limited by geographic boundaries so people everywhere must be able to use the most recent research to better manage diseases no matter where the outbreak.”

Read more

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AGORA adds SHARE to its databases: Get access to 125 additional data providers!

7th October 2016

AGORA has added SHARE to its database. SHARE is a collection of open-access data and enriches AGORA with data from 125 additional data providers.

AGORA provides a collection of 20 databases that are listed on the AGORA search portal. AGORA users can now benefit from direct access to the SHARE dataset through the AGORA collection.

SHARE is one of six databases on AGORA that are freely accessible and that do not require authentication.

The SHARE initiative was founded in 2013 and it is a partnership between the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Center for Open Science (COS). The initiative is funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

SHARE develops services to support free sharing of information about research and scholarly activities across their life cycle. It aims to increase innovation and enhance research impact through free and open available research in all areas.

The initiative addresses individuals and groups who work in a scholarly environment. SHARE takes over the gathering, cleaning, linking and enhancing of metadata from all kinds of research activities and outputs like i.e. data management plans, grant proposals, presentations, journal articles or research data.

Most data providers from SHARE are from North America however the initiative is open for international researchers and wants to support international interoperability. SHARE is looking for opportunities to strengthen international scholarly collaboration.

 

AGORA users are invited to check out and use the SHARE data set through the AGORA collection of databases.

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Research4Life Chooses PortSys’ Total Access Control to Ensure Critical Access and Authentication

4th October 2016

PortSys announces adoption of its Total Access Control product by the Research4Life partnership to replace end-of-life Microsoft authentication system.

Marlborough, Mass. October 4, 2016 – Research4Life and PortSys today announced the adoption of Total Access Control (TAC) to provide secure access to Research4Life’s nearly 70,000 peer-reviewed scientific journals, books and databases for researchers, health care providers and policymakers in low and middle income countries. The Research4Life partnership aims to bridge the digital research divide between the global North and South, providing access to over 8000 institutions in over a hundred countries.

“Research4Life is excited to embark on the next evolution of the partnership’s core technology. The migration to Total Access Control will ensure the continued support of Research4Life’s primary goal – to provide affordable access to critical scientific research for users from eligible institutions in the developing world,” said Daniel Dollar, Chair of the Research4Life Executive Council, and Director of Collection Development, Yale University Library. “Research4Life looks forward to exploring the capabilities of Total Access Control to dramatically simplify secure access and provide a seamless user experience.”

“This is such an important initiative that the people at Research4Life, as well as over 200 publishers, have undertaken,” stated PortSys CEO, Michael Oldham, “The task of being able to provide users in developing countries with access to invaluable research materials, health journals, agricultural information and so much more is an enormous enterprise by an amazing team of people from all over the world. PortSys is honored to have Total Access Control selected to assist in this effort. We believe it offers an all-inclusive solution which will make security issues simpler, stronger and more unified.”

Total Access Control brings together multiple technologies like VPN, SSL/VPN, Single Sign On, Portal Access, Multifactor Authentication, MDM (Mobile Device Management), Application Firewall, Application Acceleration and Cloud Access Control into a single, scalable product that manages access across the entire enterprise. Oldham continued, “If a security product makes life more difficult for the end user, you’ve already lost. Just walk around your office and see how many yellow stickies you have on monitors with usernames and passwords on them! That’s not security, that’s an open invitation. Total Access Control makes life easier for the end user while significantly strengthening security across the organization.”

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About PortSys

PortSys, Inc., (www.portsys.com) founded in 2008, is a privately funded company focusing on information security and access control. PortSys currently has customers worldwide representing some of the world’s largest financial institutions, government ministries, defense departments, utilities, healthcare organizations and industry-leading enterprises. With headquarters in Marlborough, MA, USA, PortSys also serves customers from its offices in the UK and through distributors throughout Europe, Middle East and Africa.

About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research for Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 70,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

Kristin Canders
Portsys
kcanders@emergepr.com
+1 207-974-7744

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Winners of Research4Life prize drawing announced

20th September 2016
img_0336


Dr. Christopher Dye and Kimberly Parker from WHO

King Hussein Cancer Center is the lucky winner of the First Prize 

Research4Life provides access to tens of thousands of online books and journals daily, but it is a rare occasion when it can offer a physical printed publication to one of the institutions. All institutions who paid for 2016 access to Research4Life were automatically entered this year in a Research4Life random drawing  to win a major reference printed publication from one of the publisher partners. The slips with institution names on them were drawn in a random selection by Dr Christopher Dye, the Director of SPI (Strategy, Policy and Information) of the World Health Organization.

The reference publications offered as prizes by the Research4Life partnership were:

*ICD-10 International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision, Vol.1-3, 2010 edition (provided by the World Health Organization)
*Principles and Practice of Clinical Research, 4th edition (provided by Elsevier)

Delivering the first Prize for Ms Alice Haddadin, Director Library King Hussein Cancer Center

With great pleasure, we announce the first prize, first runner up and honourable mention winners of our 2016 payment promotion!

  • King Hussein Cancer Center (Jordan) – First Prize
  • St. George’s University (Grenada) – First runner up
  • Universiteti Aldent (Albania) – Honourable mention
  • University of Academy of Science of Moldova. Central Scientific Library “A. Lupan” (Republic of Moldova) – Honourable mention
  • Center of Early Intervention “Voinicel” (Republic of Moldova)  – Honourable mention
  • University of Tirana (Albania) – Honourable mention
  • Ministry of Health. National Aids Programme (Suriname) – Honourable mention
  • Trinity School of Medicine (Saint Vincent and the Grenadines) – Honourable mention
  • Ilia State University(ISU) (Georgia) – Honourable mention
  • Universidad Católica Boliviana San Pablo, Regional Santa Cruz (Bolivia) – Honourable mention

We look forward to holding similar drawings in the future for the benefit of all the Research4Life institutions.  Congratulations to all the winning participants!

Professor Ivan Puiu from Voinicel Center

Professor Ivan Puiu from Voinicel Center

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2016 MLA Hinari/Research4Life Grant Recipients

14th September 2016

The Medical Library Association (MLA)mla and the Elsevier Foundation have announced the recipients of the 2016 MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grants.

hinlogo-05Funded by the Elsevier Foundation, these grants will support HINARI/R4L training activities that promote the use of the programs’ scientific research resources in emerging/low income countries. The recipients will use the grants to benefit individuals to obtain skills to effectively and efficiently use the Hinari/Research4Life resources and also become trainers for their institutions or country.

The recipients will be honored at the Presidents’ Awards Dinner during MLA’17 in Seattle, Washington.

  • Martha Cecilia Garcia, Coordinator National Library of Medicine, Honduras, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Honduras.
  • Karin Saric, Information Services Librarian, Norris Medical Library, University of Southern California, USA.
  • Alemayehu Bisrat, Health Informatics Expert and Project Coordinator, Center for eHealth, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia.
  • Dativa Tibyampansha, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
  • Megan von Isenburg, Duke University, North Carolina, USA.

Congratulations to the winners!

Ready to Submit an Application for the 2017 Grants?

Choose the 2017 MLA Hinari/Research4Life Grant online application form. The completed online form and supporting documents must be received by December 1.  Be certain to follow the application checklist, as submissions lacking required information will not be reviewed.

For more information visit www.mlanet.org

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New Hinari Master Trainer Online Course

6th September 2016

We are pleased to announce the new Hinari Master Trainer course.

On the next October 1st, a new 4-week free online Hinari Master Trainer Course will start thanks to the collaboration with our partners Librarians without Borders (Medical Library Association) and the Information Training and Research Centre for Africa (ITOCA).

The course aims to present the recent developments of the Hinari portal and provide training in different topics such as searching for health information and marketing a library. At the end of the course, participants will be able to enhance their knowledge on various information sources in health and develop the capacity to self-organize training activities in their own institutions.

Some of the modules covered include:

  • Using Hinari/PubMed database
  • Using Summon for searching in Hinari
  • Accessing e-books and health information on the Internet
  • Organizing an e-resource workshop
  • Developing a Marketing Plan

In order to participate in the course, applicants must be residing in a Hinari eligible country (please note the course will be offered in English only at this time) and must have attended a past recent Hinari workshop (between 2012 and 2016).

Application form can be found in the following link: goo.gl/forms/r7B1ZbDPnVjBeGDU2

Don’t miss this opportunity to become a Hinari Master Trainer!

Artboard 1

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Research4Life is now part of Oxfam’s Digital Searching and Access Guideline

1st September 2016

Screen Shot 2016-09-01 at 2.20.52 PMIn November 2012, Oxfam  -one of the biggest international organizations working to fight poverty-, launched a series of guidelines to help development practitioners conduct high-quality research. The “how-to” guidelines are available in the Oxfam Policy and Practice website, which offers free access to over 4,000 publications. The research guidelines cover different aspects of the research process including the communication of research.

Originally written for Oxfam staff and partners, the guidelines cover important topics such as conducting interviews, planning surveys, creating graphics and other methodologies for best research practices. The guidelines have become very popular and are cited by academic literature and research reports.

Since July 2016, one of the guidelines, Reviewing the existing literature now reflects the work of Research4Life and INASP -one of Research4Life’s partners- in making books, journals, and databases more widely accessible to researchers in the developing world. We’re looking forward to keep working more with Oxfam in the production of research guidelines.

All guidelines are in English with some available in French and Spanish.

For more information visit the Oxfam Policy and Practice website or check the full list of Oxfam’s Research Guidelines.

 

 

 

 

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Research4Life General Partners Meeting 2016

11th August 2016
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2016 Research4Life General Partners Meeting delegates

The Research4Life Annual General Partners Meeting was held at Cornell University’s Weill Cornell Medical College on  20 and 21 July 2016 in New York City. The meeting brought together more than 30 delegates and observers representing our publishing community, the United Nations agencies, University libraries, the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers and two representatives from the user community.

The overall purpose of the meeting was to review the work of Research4Life and its programmes during the past year as well as discuss the emerging strategic issues, outlined in the new strategy document “Beyond 2020” which describes the priorities for the next five years and beyond .

The General Partners Partners Meeting was an invaluable space for communication, providing a showcase for the pioneering work of Research4Life and its programmes —in partnership with hundreds of publishers—in providing access to scientific information in the developing world and an opportunity to learn from our colleagues, whose feedback guides our strategic vision.

The next Research4Life General Partners Meeting will be held in Oxford in July 2017.

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Research4life/INASP Advocacy competition on Elsevier Connect

4th July 2016

Grace-Ajuwon2To highlight the critical role that doctors, researchers, librarians and policymakers play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries, Research4Life joined with INASP to launch an advocacy competition. The aim of the contest is to find case studies that show how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

A good example of advocacy leadership is the story of Grace Ajuwon, one of the first librarians to be trained to use Hinari, Research4Life’s flagship biomedical database. Over a decade ago, Grace, a senior librarian at the University of Ibadan in Nigeria, used that training to jumpstart her own research into health information. A year later, in 2003, she published a peer-reviewed paper in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, concluding that clinical and nursing students were neglecting electronic resources. Grace successfully advocated for the inclusion of computer education in medical and nursing curricula, ensuring that computer laboratories were installed and went on train thousands of medical and research staff across her own and other African institutions in effectively using scientific resource.

Read more on Elsevier Connect

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Forum on Open Data, Open Science and Open Access to Agricultural Information, Accra, Ghana

28th June 2016

AGORA_Nigeria_1

The final of three Open Data and Open Science Forums in Africa is set to take place July 11 2016, followed by the last in a series of training workshops, July 12-13


Organized by FAO in conjunction with several partners, this Forum is an opportunity to draw together senior level researchers and officers from a mixture of institutions in Ghana to talk about some of the challenges to open access to agricultural information in Ghana and Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

Timely access to agricultural research holds great potential in tackling food insecurity and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to ending poverty and hunger, particularly in SSA where institutional and national challenges mean that research often isn’t visible or accessible.

In Ghana agriculture provides over 90% of the country’s food needs and employs over 50% of the population. But many farmers don’t have access to agricultural information, or to the Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) that provide it. Accelerating progress in agriculture depends to some extent on concerted effort by all stakeholders, and a handful of prerequisites to open data and open science.

As well as better access to ICTs, these include: creating an enabling environment that supports open data and open science in agriculture; scientists and researchers being willing to share knowledge on open platforms, and farmers and rural populations empowered to adopt new technologies and innovations.

Through capacity development and support FAO has long worked alongside the Ghana Agricultural Information Network (GAINS) to enhance access to agricultural information in Ghana. FAO and GAINS proposed the Forum as part of FAO’s relationship with GAINS and its member institutions, as well as its current work with several partners, including Research4Life, Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) and Open Agriculture Knowledge for Development (CIARD).  

 The event is targeted at senior level officers, with around 60 participants attending from a mixture of agriculture-related institutions – government ministries, academia, private sector organizations, farmer organizations and NGOs from Ghana and the sub region.  Around 50 participants – researchers, lecturers, post‐graduate students in food, agriculture and rural development, and selected library and information professionals will attend the two-day training workshop that follows the forum.

Approach

The chief aim of the forum is to act as a dialogue platform for stakeholders to share knowledge on institutional and national initiatives in Ghana aimed at enhancing the visibility, access and use of agricultural data and science.Taking place over half a day the Forum will be split into two 45-minute expert and senior policy panel sessions with follow-up Q&As in Plenary .

Part II of the Ghana Forum (12-13 July 2016) is a two-day training workshop with a core focus on accessing online, peer-reviewed literature through the Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) and the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology (AGRIS). The workshops also provides an overview of intellectual property and copyright challenges, and existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

Specific objectives

  • Raise awareness of the main global trends in scientific publishing in agriculture focusing on open data and open science strategies
  • Share knowledge and discuss national trends on enhancing access to agriculture data and science;
  • Discuss strategies to advocate for open data and open science in agriculture
  • Discuss potential mechanisms for enhanced knowledge sharing initiatives in agriculture in SSA.
  • Enhance capacities of researchers, lecturers and post‐graduate students in agriculture and rural development on accessing online, peer‐reviewed literature in agriculture and related sciences through AGORA and AGRIS.

Expected outcomes

A common understanding of:

  • The role and potential contributions of open data, open science and open access to food and nutrition security
  • Current trends in open data and open science and the challenges that Ghana faces
  • Institutional and national policy implications and strategies for open data and open science
  • Enhanced mechanisms for sharing knowledge on open data and open science initiatives, technologies and standards
  • Enhanced skills to access and use online resources on AGRIS and AGORA.

Organizers


logos_forum_Ghana

The following organizations are working together to organize the forum:

  • Institute for Scientific and Technological Information (INSTI) of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR)
  • Association of African Universities (AAU)
  • Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA)
  • College of Basic and Applied Sciences (CBAS) of the University of Ghana (UG)
  • Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
  • Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN)
  • Research4Life
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INASP and Research4Life Launch Research Advocacy Competition

28th June 2016

Global case study competition spotlights how users in the developing world have successfully advocated for a sustainable research culture.

London, United Kingdom June 28, 2016INASP and Research4Life have announced today a competition to recognize the critical role that researchers, librarians, policymakers, doctors and other professionals play in advocating their leaders to support research in their institutions and countries. The competition calls for case studies demonstrating how users have overcome hurdles to boost critical leadership support for the information and infrastructural resources needed to improve evidence based health care, agriculture and environmental policies as well as basic research in their countries.

Over the last two decades, INASP and Research4Life have worked to close the information gap between developed and developing countries by providing free or low cost access to academic, scientific, and professional peer-reviewed content online and providing the necessary training to support researchers, practitioners, librarians and authors in building viable research ecosystems. The competition will run from June 28th to September 15th and highlight best practice in garnering support from leaders to improve the sustainability of this access and usage. Case studies will be reviewed by a committee of distinguished international partners from the INASP and Research4Life communities.

Julie Brittain, Executive Director of INASP says: “Since 2002, INASP has been working with libraries, library consortia and publishers to supply relevant and appropriate online literature to academics and researchers in all fields. Top level support from institutional leaders has enabled librarians to provide access to much needed content and to build awareness and use among academics, researchers and students. We are keen for all those involved to share stories of how they have gathered support from decision makers and budget holders, as this is the key to on-going, long term access to research literature.”

“Since 2001, Research4Life has been working to provide access to critical research in the developing world. Our reach has grown to 117 countries and 69,000 journals, books and databases, but we realize more than ever that it can only be truly sustainable if leaders “upstream” of practitioners, researchers, and librarians are equally supportive of this need,” said Richard Gedye, Chair of the Executive Council for Research4Life and Director of Outreach Programmes at the International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers, “Our competition aims to celebrate and share those advocacy successes.”

The INASP/Research4Life Advocacy Competition is open to all researchers, practitioners, librarians and policymakers whose institution is a registered user of one of the Research4Life programmes  Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI or has access to research through an agreement mediated by INASP. Submissions will be accepted through http://www.research4life.org/research4life-inasp-advocacy-competition. The winner be announced in November and invited to present their work at the annual Publishers for Development conference and Research4Life General Partners Meeting in the UK in July 2017. Three contributing Research4Life partners have pledged prizes: Elsevier will provide the winner with a travel grant to cover their attendance at these meetings, SAGE Publishing has offered a one year subscription to a major reference work and Taylor & Francis will provide an honourable mention award.

###

About INASP
INASP (www.inasp.info) is an international development charity working with a global network of partners to improve access, production and use of research information and knowledge, so that countries are equipped to solve their development challenges.

About Research4Life
Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (Hinari), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8,000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to nearly 70,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Communications Coordinator
Research4Life
communications@research4life.org
@r4lpartnership

Alex Kealey,
Communications Officer
INASP
akealey@inasp.info
@INASPinfo

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A total of 69,000 online resources now available in Research4Life

26th May 2016

The total online resources available in Research4Life is going up

We are pleased to announce a new update in the number of online resources available through the Research4Life programes. In the last 18 months, the total count of material has risen up to 69,000, an increase of 42% from the latest count of 48,000.

The new number of resources includes new titles added to books, journals and other information material in the collections of the four Research4Life programmes –Hinari, AGORA, OARE and ARDI-.

R4L_numbers_2016_all-02

Each of the Research4Life programs have updated number of resources with major additions in the AGORA collection. 15,000 new e-books related to chemistry, economics, geography and geology were added to AGORA now bringing the total number of books to up to 22,000.

You can access this range of resources by logging into your specific program using your institution’s credentials. If you are not registered yet find out if your institution is eligible and register now.

Hinari online resources
AGORA online resources
OARE online resources
ARDI online resources
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Total resources on AGORA swells to 28,000

24th May 2016

AGORA_screenshot

Huge new input onto the platform gives researchers access to 15,000 new books


New resources are being added to Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) all the time but this latest addition represents an enormous boost to the online collection, with 15,000 new e-books now bringing the total number of books to 22,000.

The primary publishers of the new books are Elsevier, John Wiley & Sons, and Oxford University Press Books, and the titles – 479 of them newly published – are primarily related to chemistry, economics, geography and geology.

In addition, the number of journals on AGORA now nudges 6,000 taking the total number of combined resources on the platform to just under 28,000.

You can access this range of resources by logging into AGORA using your institution’s credentials. (If you’re not registered but would like to find out more, click here).

Looking forward AGORA’s collection of research resources is likely to continue to grow at an impressive rate. Access the full range of content through AGORA’s Summon search engine.

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Tanzania workshop on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA), May 24-25 2016

23rd May 2016

TansaniaThe Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO of the UN) in conjunction with several partners is organizing a series of training workshops across Asia and Africa focused on access to research in agriculture and fisheries. Last month workshops were held in Namibia and Myanmar. Now a similar workshop is set to take place at Tanzania’s Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) May 24-25 2016.


Tanzania_BlogTailored to researchers the workshops are aimed at drawing attention to the scope of free online agricultural information available on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA) and AGRIS (International System for Agricultural Science and Technology) and in effectively using these resources.

Alongside this core focus, the workshops raise awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, with a look at the further range of resources available to researchers in agricultural research.

Background

Being able to access timely agricultural information and understanding how to get the best out of research is a key issue, particularly in Tanzania. It is the fastest growing economy in the East African community and over the past decade has made stellar progress in sustaining economic growth, with the amount of people living in “basic needs poverty” falling 34.4% in 2006, to 28.2% by 2012, according to a World Bank poverty assessment.

However, this relative domestic stability hasn’t translated into economic growth for many Tanzanians. The country remains one of the poorest countries in Sub Saharan Africa, with up 12 million people living in poverty, 10 million of them in rural areas. A 2014 UN Tanzania Human Development (THD) Report suggests that economic growth alone is not enough to make a difference.

Agriculture is seen as one of the country’s top priorities in reducing poverty. The sector employs around three quarters of Tanzania’s workforce and accounts for around a quarter of the country’s GDP. Separately, a FAO report describes fisheries as a huge source of untapped potential.

Meanwhile, Arica’s research output is booming – ResearchTrends reported that African authors nearly doubled their research share over the past decade. More research than ever is available. But mentoring researchers in Tanzania to locate and use agricultural information and raising awareness of free and low cost platforms like AGORA and AGRIS has the potential to make a big impact on agricultural productivity.

Workshop: approach

While there are a huge amount of research resources on AGORA and AGRIS, making effective searches on both platforms requires know-how, and the idea is for the workshop to train researchers to get the best out of the two programs so that they can share this knowledge back in their institutions.

The workshops provide an overview of both databases, with guidance on searching through the range of free and low-cost research materials and training on some of the new trends and challenges in open science, open access and open data in agriculture. As well as an overview of intellectual and copyright a further section of the workshop looks at existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

Day two of the workshop features a special panel session, which is yet to be confirmed.

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI, AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provides low-income countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online.

The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research.

Set up by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO of the UN) together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides low-income countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, with a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in low-income countries. Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network and alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge.

Organizers

FAO is organizing the workshop in conjunction with GODANITOCA, COSTECH, AIMS, AGORA and Research4Life

Sources

New-Ag (New Agriculturalist)

AllAfrica.com

UN Human Development Report 2015

WorldBank

Fao Fisheries and Aquaculture Dept

WorldBank.org

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Namibia hosts Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Africa in the context of Sustainable Development Goals, 18 April 2016

12th April 2016

Namibia_WS

The second of four forums organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) and partners, the forum is targeted at experts from senior government, academia and NGOs.


Strengthening access to agricultural science and technical information (Open Data and Open Science*) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is vital if Africa is to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to ending hunger, alleviating poverty, gender equality, climate change and health.

Due to challenges at both an institutional and national level much agriculture-related data produced in SSA isn’t visible or accessible, hindering any meaningful impact on food security in the region. A UN report found that in 2015 more than 40% of the population of SSA was still living in poverty and that the region faces daunting challenges with regards rapid population growth, high levels of poverty and conflicts.  Data has become a key asset for agricultural transformation in Africa. Indeed greater access to and sharing of agricultural data and science are two of the keys to unlocking change, allowing innovative solutions to be developed to address food insecurity and poverty on the continent.

However, in order for Open Data and Open Science initiatives to make any meaningful impact on SDGs and on the lives of Africans, most of whom make a living in the rural domain, they must draw together and galvanize players from the full agricultural spectrum.

An enabling environment where agricultural researchers and experts can share their innovations on open platforms is imperative. Farmers, rural populations and development specialists must also be empowered to adopt new innovative technologies and solutions aimed at combatting hunger and poverty in the region.

Sustainable Development Goals

As the eight Millennium Development Goals of the last 15 years came to a conclusion in 2015, a new set of transformative Sustainable Development Goals took their place. While the MDGs made huge strides on a global scale towards eradicating extreme poverty and inequality, development in SSA has been patchy and the challenge is now on to transform the demands of the new SDGs into action. 

Formally signed by the UN in September 2015 The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda included 17 new goals and 169 targets with individual governments expected to create national frameworks for achieving them.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon described the new SDGs as a “shared vision of humanity, and a to-do list for people and planet and a blueprint for success”.

The new SDGs go a step further than the MDGs, addressing the root causes of poverty and the universal need for development. They place increased emphasis on the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection. With the spotlight increasingly on sustainability, Open Data and Open Science initiatives in agriculture in Africa come into even sharper focus. 


Namibia totemGoal of the forums

The chief objective of the forums is to provide a dialogue platform where senior agricultural experts in SSA can articulate some of the challenges to Open Data and Open Science and propose possible strategies.

The forum in Namibia, where around half the population depends largely on subsistence agriculture for a living and the national level of income inequality is one of the highest in the world, asks how enhancing access to Open Data and Science in agriculture can enable the country and indeed, SSA to fulfill SDGs.  

Senior experts in agriculture will:

  • exchange knowledge on institutional and national initiatives aimed at enhancing access to agricultural data science
  • share knowledge and discuss national global trends on data and science access
  • discuss potential mechanisms for enhanced knowledge sharing initiatives in agriculture in SSA.

Expected outcomes

  • A common understanding the role of open data and open science in achieving Africa’s SDGs. 
  • Clarification of the institutional, national and regional policy implications for open data and open science
  • Agreement on the mechanisms, technologies and standards for sharing open data and open science initiatives

Approach

Spearheaded by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO of the UN), the collective forums in Kenya (June 2015), Namibia (April 2016), Ghana (July 2016) and Tanzania (May 2016) gather together senior specialists from policy, research information and technology in agriculture and related fields. 

In Namibia two senior policy panel discussions will be followed by facilitated discussions in plenary. Panelists include high profile experts in agricultural and rural development, science, technology and library and information management from Namibia and the sub region.

Part II of the Namibia forum (19-20 April 2016) is a two-day workshop on access to scientific information in agriculture. Transforming the overarching theme of the forum into practical training sessions, the workshop is targeted at agriculture information workers with the core focus on Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture (AGORA)

The first forum in Kenya

44 participants gathered in Nairobi in June 2015 (see photo above) where they agreed that Open Science and Open Data requires an enabling environment framework, including appropriate policies and strategies on a governmental and institutional level. Furthermore, researchers and scientists required a more rewarding system that supports open publishing and collaborative research work, especially with regard to young scientists.

One of the key issues is a lack of understanding of the mechanics of Open Data and Open Science with unclear intellectual property rights policies leading to an “over protection” of data.

However, the forum highlighted several Kenyan initiatives already in place to support open science and to foster processes to improved access to agricultural data. Advocacy on an institutional and governmental level was a key recommendation and the Kenya Agricultural Information Network (KAINet) secretariat and member institutions are focused on driving this forward.

Scheduled follow-ups to the forum will be aimed at consolidating permanent dialogue between stakeholders.

Take a look at the full report

Forum on Open Data and Open Science in Agriculture in Nambia

The forum takes place on 18th April at the Avani Hotel in Windhoek, Namibia – speakers to be confirmed.  It is co-organized by FAO alongside the National University of Namibia (UNAM), GODAN, Information Training and Outreach Centre for Africa (ITOCA), and Research4Life.

Since 1975 FAO has supported initiatives aimed at opening up access to agricultural data. It is currently working closely alongside several partners, including the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN), Open Agriculture Knowledge for Development (CIARD), and Research4Life to improve access to available agriculture and nutrition data, with a view to contributing to enhance food security in Africa.  All four forums are part of this initiative.

Forum dates:

Namibia: 18 – 20 April 2016
Tanzania: 23 – 25 May 2016
Ghana: 11 – 13 July 2016


*Open data is the idea that certain data should be freely available to everyone to use and republish as they wish, without restrictions from copyright, patents or other mechanisms of control.

Open science is the umbrella term of the movement to make scientific research, data and dissemination accessible to all levels of an inquiring society, amateur or professional. It encompasses practices such as publishing open research, campaigning for open access, encouraging scientists to practice open notebook science, and generally making it easier to publish and communicate scientific knowledge.”

Source: Wikipedia 

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Myanmar Universities Hosting Training Workshop on Access To Global Online Research in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry 25-29 April 2016

12th April 2016

Yangon_University

FAO of the United Nations in conjunction with WorldFish and Research4Life is organizing two workshops at the University of Yangon and Yezin University in Myanmar this month. The workshops are aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry, as well as providing access to information and research in these fields.


2015 marked a shift in scientific publishing. While the research community still has to compete for funding there is fresh emphasis on research data sets being “intelligently open” (otherwise known as Open Data*) so that others can use them. Since the adoption of the new 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda the question of Open Data and Open Science* – and in particular ways of accessing and managing those information sources, is at the forefront of the debate.

With the goal of drawing together experts from research organizations in Myanmar, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, WorldFish and Research4Life are organizing a series of workshops aimed at raising awareness of key trends in scientific publishing in agriculture, fisheries and forestry. These workshops will look at ways that free access to information and research on agriculture, forestry and fisheries is provided, as well as supporting researchers in data management and publication. 

Myanmar: background

Myanmar_LakeFisheries play a crucial role as a source of livelihood for millions of people in Myanmar with fish being one of the most important food groups. Forestry regeneration in the country has the power to enhance the livelihood benefits of the population both through livelihood oriented forest management and marketing development.  

Although Myanmar is the largest country in South East Asia it also one of the poorest, with poverty disproportionately concentrated in rural areas where the majority of the population lives. Compounding this, visibility and access to information about poverty in Myanmar is lacking, making it hard to identify key restraints to the future development of aquaculture and forestry management, especially their role in alleviating poverty.  Emerging threats from population growth, conflict and climate change, particularly natural disasters, exacerbate the challenge.

According to a national survey on social protection and poverty reduction presented by the FAO in conjunction with Myanmar’s Department of Rural Development, priority in Myanmar should be given to vulnerable fishing communities for poverty reduction and rural development, particularly to increase access to appropriate and effective social assistance.

In the context of these overlapping demands there is a need for well-designed programs and projects that draw attention to the range of free agricultural information resources available to researchers. Strengthening access to agricultural, forestry and fisheries-related data, and indeed training people to use these research tools in Myanmar, has enormous potential to make a difference to people’s lives, as well as for the country to fulfill wider Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   

Myanmar totem

Workshops: approach

The main focus of the workshops is to introduce two databases: AGORA and the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology (AGRIS) – two research tools that give researchers in low-income countries access to a wealth of scientific research and information on agriculture.

The workshops will provide an overview of the overarching structure of the two databases, giving guidance on how best to search through the range of research materials.

A further section focuses on existing tools for accessing information to agricultural research, including Google Scholar, Google Books, Aquatic Commons, PubAg, and TEEAL.

In addition, day two of the Yangon University workshop features a special panel session on “Access to Scientific Information in Myanmar” with presentations from two speakers.

AGORA, AGRIS, Research4Life

Set up by FAO of the UN together with major publishers (Elsevier has provided over a quarter of the content), AGORA provides developing countries with access to an outstanding digital library in the fields of food, agriculture, environmental science and related social sciences, providing a collection of over 6,000 journals and 5,800 books in over 100 low-income countries.

AGRIS is a FAO-maintained global public database providing bibliographic information on agricultural science and technology. Like AGORA its chief goal is to improve access to and the exchange of agricultural information in developing countries.  Over 150 institutions from 65 countries contribute to the AGRIS network. Alongside search results AGRIS links to other sources on the web, further enriching knowledge. 

 The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Research4Life is the collective name for the four programmes – HINARI, AGORAOARE and ARDI – that provide developing countries with free or low cost access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content online

ORGANIZERS

The organizers of these events are WorldFish, Research4Life, FAO of the United Nations, GODAN, University of Yangon and University of Yenzin.


Sources:
Elsevier
Asian Development Blog
World Food Programme
WorldFish

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Grants now open to train LIS professionals and users in developing countries on how to use Research4Life

11th April 2016

MLA_grantDuring the past decade, I have had the privilege of conducting 60-plus workshops in 35 countries to teach individuals in developing countries how to access Research4Life resources. As the key advocate behind Librarians without Borders® (LWB), I have had wonderful experiences working with information professionals, lecturers, physicians, researchers and students from universities, research centers, ministries of health and non-governmental organizations.

Since 2007, I have been the coordinator of the LWB E-library Training Initiative sponsored by the Medical Library Association (MLA) and funded by the Elsevier Foundation. In December, MLA announced the expansion of this initiative, including the new MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grant that focuses on training activities for the Research4Life programs. This expansion reflects a decade-long commitment of Elsevier and the Elsevier Foundation to fund MLA/LWB for a cumulative commitment of US $409,000 to provide essential training to boost Research4Life usage in developing countries.

Read more

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Communication channel: AGORA now has an active discussion forum on DGroups!

31st March 2016

The new group on the e-mail based dialogue platform is a place to stay informed about AGORA and to network 


agora-01At its heart DGroups is a dialogue platform that connects a partnership of groups working in international development. Designed to be as simple and inclusive as possible DGroups uses e-mail as a mode of communication rather than web forums, facilitating users in countries in the south with low bandwidth.

Once signed up to the AGORA DGroup mailing list (it takes less than a minute) members can expect to receive e-mail updates with recent blog posts and news covering anything from capacity development activities to new content. There’ll also be plenty of AGORA-related discussions to join in with.

As one of four initiatives under the Research4Life umbrella AGORA’s mission is to open up access to online research in agriculture in developing countries, and DGroups represents a vital link in this chain.

We look to forward to seeing you on there soon!

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MLA HINARI/Research4Life Grant

10th March 2016

znptcptkThe Medical Library Association (MLA) has announced the HINARI/Research4Life (R4L) Grant for 2016. Funded by the Elsevier Foundation, up to five awards, will support HINARI/R4L training activities that promote the use of the programs’ scientific research resources in emerging/low income countries.  The grants will benefit the users in the eligible countries as these individuals will obtain skills to effectively and efficiently use the HINARI/R4L resources and also become a training resource for their institutions or country.

Who can apply?

  • Applicants are required to hold a professional library or information science qualification, but in the case of exceptional candidates this criterion may be waived. Transcripts or a copy of the diploma should be sent with all applications.
  • Applicants must be currently employed in a health and/or sciences library or related science information organization.
  • Individuals and/or institutions are eligible to submit proposals.
  • Applicants are not required to be members of MLA.

Terms

  • The grant award is contingent upon completion of the project within 18 months of notification of the award.
  • Agreement to submit an interim (9 month) and final reports to MLA’s Librarians Without Borders® The final report that focuses on the results of the project will be posted on the LWB Blog and may be published in other health/science-related information venues or journals.
  • The completed application form and additional documentation must be received by June 13, 2016.
  • More than one grant may be offered in a year. Grants range from $1500 to $6000 and are distributed in one payment.
  • Grant funds are distributed in June following the MLA annual meeting with the project completion date being December 31 of the following year.
  • If there are no appropriate applications, as reviewed by the jury, the association may elect not to fund a grant or multiple grants in a given year.
  • MLA will acknowledge applications upon receipt via email.

Ready to Submit an Application?

All supporting documents and application forms must be completed by June 13, 2016. Incomplete and late submissions will not be considered.
For more information visit the MLA grant site or contact MLA’s grants coordinator with questions.

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Research4Life Partners Newsletter November 2015

3rd December 2015

Table of Contents


Note from the Editor

 

Dear Partners,

With the launch of the UN Sustainable Development Goals in September, the Research4Life partnership is more determined than ever to bridge the digital divide with our free and low cost access programmes. Our twice-yearly newsletter is designed to bring you up to speed with everything (or almost everything) going on in Research4Life. It is in fact such a dynamic partnership, that it’s hard to capture all that we’re doing. This is a testimony to the incredibly dedicated champions across the partnership from the UN organizations to Yale, Cornell and so many of our publishers.  As you’ll see from our news, we’re exploring new programme ideas around the rule of law, additional UN funding possibilities, and much more. Take a moment to browse and share the latest case studies, milestones and social media campaigns. Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and ‘like’ us on Facebook.  Want to get more involved? We have teams focused on everything from communications to training, fundraising, technology and impact. Contact us at info@research4life.org.

Ylann Schemm, Chair of the Research4Life Communications Team and Elsevier Foundation Programme Director

 



Research4Life Annual General Partners Meeting

gpm

Research4Life General Partners Meeting – Geneva, July 2015

The 2015 Research4Life General Partners’ Meeting (GPM) was held in Geneva, at the World Health Organization in July.  60 partners from around the world gathered for a very full agenda, including updates from each programme co-ordinator and the chairs of Research4Life’s teams and working groups. The annual GPM offers a welcome opportunity for members of our very dispersed partnership to meet in a collegial and collaborative setting. We finished our day feeling well briefed on developments over the past year and with some interesting new projects to look forward to.

A particular highlight  was the presentation of the two latest external reviews of Research4Life’s performance and effectiveness – the User Experience Review and the Review of Research4Life’s operational effectiveness and infrastructure. The discussions, and particularly the input from our two user representatives from Uganda and Vietnam, provided us with a useful opportunity to understand how the programmes are actually performing and to brainstorm on their future direction. These discussions were pursued in more depth at the Research4Life Strategic Retreat in Boston on 1-2 October. A team of volunteers is now working to draft a five year strategic plan to be presented at the 2016 GPM.

In addition, GPM delegates approved several important proposals:
Group B Research4Life eligibility was extended to the UK Overseas Dependency of St Helena, Libya and Argentina.  Group A eligibility was also extended to UNHCR-designated “Planned/managed refugee camps”.
Updates were also given on three potential initiatives:

  • GOALI.  A new Research4Life programme covering the Rule of law,
  • DARTT.  A programme for collaboration between Research4Life  and the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Small Island Developing States (UN-OHRLLS),
  • Friends of Research4Life.  A proposal to found an fundraising organization.

 



Research4Life in the News

 



Training Workshops Highlights

Map_trainings_2015_general-01

Our latest Research4LIfe infographic, created by Natalia Rodriguez, offers an overview of the national training workshops conducted by the Research4Life programmes over the past year. Click here to read more and enlarge the infographic.

  • TReND in Africa Course on Science Communication and Writing:
    In September TReND in Africa organized a week-long course on Science Communication and Writing at Chancellor College in Malawi. Sixteen young researchers from six African countries learned theory and skills to reach out to the broadest possible audience. During the week, young scientists participated in lots of activities ranging from getting the research they need through Research4Life, to writing abstracts, designing posters and posting engaging articles on the course blog. The course was funded by the Elsevier Foundation with contributions from Sunbird Malawi, and crowdfunding via Indiegogo and Mendeley.
  • Workshops in Hanoi, Vietnam
    On September 28 and 29, Lenny Rhine gave additional workshops in Hanoi, Vietnam. The initial workshop reached a 100 students and offered a one day training at the Bach Mai Hospital, a huge tertiary care institution for MA nursing students and clinical cardiology staff. The training covered: Boolean search terms, Google vs. Scholar vs PubMed, HINARI and PubMed searching,  Evidence-based Medicine resources and How to Read a Scientific Paper. A second half-day workshop was given at the Hanoi University of Medicine. This briefer workshop focused on information needs for researchers particularly those working in parasitology and related subjects.

 



Kimberly Parker Wins MLA Lifetime Recognition Award

new_contentKimberly Parker, our HINARI Programme Manager, was presented with the T. Mark Hodges International Service Award in recognition of her outstanding work on behalf of the partnership at the World Health Organization. This award was established in 2007 to honour outstanding individual achievements in promoting, enabling, and delivering improvements in the quality of health information internationally through the development of health information professionals, the improvement of libraries, or an increased use of health information services.

 

 



Mendeley Blog 

b47ea894-2fe1-4e1c-8b2d-3d2894ee2587Mendeley published a blog explaining why they support Research4Life and TReND in Africa’s workshops. It highlights some of TReND’s courses as well. “Mendeley has a vision: to make science more open and to broaden access to scientific content where it can make a real difference to people’s lives.”

 

 

 



Publisher of the Month: Wolters Kluwer & UpToDate®

95dd80d7-bf80-46c4-991e-b8c85f83c357The Research4Life HINARI programme announced a partnership with Wolters Kluwer to provide free access to UpToDate® for the three countries affected by Ebola (Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea). Access is provided for an initial period of at least one year. UpToDate® is the world’s premier online clinical decision support resource from the Health division of Wolters Kluwer. Click here to read more on the partnership.

 


Update: DARTT and Technology Bank for Least Developed Countries UN Initiative

9b7777f9-3401-4e95-abb6-8789e524800eOn 2-4 September, HINARI Programme Manager Kimberly Parker and HINARI founder Barbara Aronson served as expert advisors in Istanbul to the UN High-Level Panel assessing the feasibility of a proposed Technology Bank dedicated to assisting the world’s least developed countries (LDCs) advance out of poverty. Kimberly and Barbara recommended that the Technology Bank incorporate an activity that could become a new Research4Life programme (DARTT) focused on LDCs. The Feasibility Report of the High-Level Panel was delivered to the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon on 22 September, and is currently on the Agenda for the 70th session of the General Assembly.  Assuming continued approval from the UN General Assembly for the initiative, and the pledging of necessary funding, the Technology Bank could begin operations as early as the third or fourth quarter of 2016.

 



Librarians without Borders Receives Elsevier Foundation Grants

7cf87f1b-3082-4a6e-9c09-b558da16a66fThe Elsevier Foundation announced it will support the Medical Library Association(MLA)/Librarians Without Borders®(LWB) E-Library Training Initiative for another three years with $45,000 annually, expanding Lenny Rhine’s work as a Master trainer to include MLA fellowships recruiting a new cadre of Librarian without Borders trainers. The Elsevier Foundation has supported LWB E-Library Training Initiative since it was founded in 2007. The 2016 – 2018 grants also ensure that the ongoing work to evolve the training infrastructure behind Research4Life is sustained.

 

 



Research4Life to Partner with DOAJ to Ensure the Inclusion of Quality Open-Access Journals

DOAJ-03Research4Life and DOAJ announced a working partnership ensuring that Research4Life-users will have access to the largest possible array of high quality open access journals. The partnership will also highlight the importance of peer reviewed open access material and will explore new syergies between the two organizations.  More information can be read in our blog.

 



New Research4Life Access for UNHCR Refugee Camps  in 2016

7e235273-3a07-4867-99b8-dd67546189abAfter receiving a request regarding the needs of refugees outside of Research4Life eligible countries, the Research4Life General Partners Meeting has approved the inclusion of UNHCR-designated “planned/managed camps” no matter where they are in the world. These camps will be provided Group A or free access. “Planned/managed camps” are the most organized and codified type in the UNHCR taxonomy of types of accommodation. Historically these camps haven’t had access because they are situated in ineligible countries or are under the management of international organizations which are themselves ineligible types of institutions. In 2016, Research4Life will open registration to “planned/managed camps” in forty countries, including six countries that are normally ineligible for the Research4Life Core Offer.

 

 



Update on Proposed New Research4Life Programme: Global Online Access to Legal Information (GOALI)

39787803-eb0d-42eb-8943-f458b54e7ee3At the last General Partner Meeting in Geneva, GOALI was granted a provisional programme affiliate status. A project team is now in place to set up GOALI within the current Research4Life structure, solicit content from publishers, seek funding and engage with potential UN or international partner organisation. GOALI will submit a full programme proposal at the 2016 Research4Life Partner Meeting. In the meantime, the project team will report to the Research4Life Executive Council on new programme developments.
To support the programme or for more information contact, Liesbeth Kanis.



Oxfam Research, Policy and Practitioner Content Now Included in Research4Life

ec225efa-5449-4b9a-968d-e87e4de0707eResearch4Life currently has over 50,000 peer-reviewed journals, books and reference works in its collection. Through the international NGO Oxfam, we are delighted to extend this offering to include other types of content of value to the researchers, academics, policy-makers and practitioners. Oxfam publishes original research, effectiveness reviews, briefing papers, training manuals, technical briefs, and learning case studies from the field on a broad range of topics concerning development and humanitarian contexts. These include, for example, climate change adaptation, resilience, water and sanitation, public health, food security, livelihoods, and gender analysis.  This ‘grey literature’, published on Oxfam Policy & Practice, is now included in HINARI, AGORA and OARE and supports the sharing of practical expertise and evidence into use. Based on the response to the new Oxfam content, we will likely offer additional high quality grey literature in the future.

 



Elsevier Foundation Grant for Marketing and Communications

1e8ec665-6026-45f8-ad39-16171f2882b9The Research4Life Communications team is very happy to receive a one time grant of $25,000 to support extensive marketing and communications outreach in 2015. Activities will focus on three of the five critical areas identified in the 2015 user and infrastructure reviews,including raising awareness of Research4Life in both the North and the South, engagement with users and participation in training.

 

 



Web and Social Media Update

51cfece3-ff93-49d4-aa29-d7b54002940fTo close a successful 2015 we have an updated website with new features and look. Take a look around and discover some of the new additions to our web portal:

  • New slides in the homepage
  • A footer menu and Newsflash subscription option
  • New Case Study section layout
  • Media Center with promotional material available to the public
  • The Training Portal has new and updated material including a calendar of events.

 



Latest Research4Life Stats & Facts

6140cd9d-ff62-4989-a6f1-09dd5c71a7fdBelow is a breakdown looking at Research4Life as a whole and the different programme elements as of July 2015. Research4Life currently makes available content from some 650 publishers, of whom 208 are full collaborating partners. Of these, 156 provide subscription based content.
 Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 09.44.49

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WHO’s HINARI program partners with Wolters Kluwer to provide UpToDate to Ebola-affected African countries

8th September 2015

Waltham, Massachusetts September 9th, 2015 – The World Health Organization (WHO)-hosted HINARI program announced a partnership with Wolters Kluwer to provide free access to UpToDate®, its evidence-based clinical decision support resource, to the three countries affected by Ebola (Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea) for an initial period of at least one year.

The main objective of this partnership is to build and strengthen capacity in those countries by providing their health workers with free access to the new developments in physician care, new research and up-to-date clinical information. Having access to the best available information at the point of care will enable them to make better patient management decisions and create resilient health systems able to withstand crisis events like those of the Ebola outbreak.

Beyond this partnership, the UpToDate team from Wolters Kluwer and WHO, along with other HINARI partners, will also be exploring guidance for WHO’s Member States on how their healthcare systems can harness the benefits of evidence-based clinical decision support systems by integrating them into the clinicians’ workflow effectively.

There is solid evidence of the impact that knowledge systems such as UpToDate have on improved outcomes in quality of care, hospital operational efficiencies and clinicians’ capacity building and skills. The WHO Strategy on Research for Health (2012) declares that “health policies and practices globally should be informed by the best research evidence.” By adopting innovative data solutions, low- and middle-income countries can leapfrog to a resilient state, bridging the healthcare gap and driving better patient outcomes across the territory.

UpToDate is the world’s premier online clinical decision support resource from the Health division of Wolters Kluwer, a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. Physician-editors synthesize the most recent medical information into evidence-based and actionable recommendations that clinicians trust to make the right patient management decisions at the point of care. Accessible online through any electronic device (laptop or mobile) UpToDate has been adopted by over 30,000 healthcare institutions across 174 countries worldwide and has become the de facto standard used to answer clinical questions at the point of care.

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About Research4Life

Research4Life (www.research4Life.org) is a public-private partnership between over 200 international scientific publishers, the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), the International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers (STM), Cornell and Yale Universities and several technology partners. The goal of Research4Life is to reduce the knowledge gap between high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries by providing affordable access to critical scientific research. Since 2002, the four programmes – Research in Health (HINARI), Research in Agriculture (AGORA), Research in the Environment (OARE) and Research for Development and Innovation (ARDI) – have provided researchers at some 8000 institutions in more than 100 low- and middle-income countries with free or low-cost online access to more than 60,000 leading journals and books in the fields of health, agriculture, environment, and applied sciences.

 

Media Contacts:

Natalia Rodriguez
Research4Life Communications Coordinator
communications@research4Life.org
Twitter: @R4LPartnership

André Rebelo
Manager, Global Public & Analyst Relations
UpToDate
Wolters Kluwer Health
Tel: +1.781.392.2411
Andre.Rebelo@WoltersKluwer.com
www.uptodate.com

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